Date   

Re: Accurail coal loads

Armand Premo
 

Jerry ,I have several Accurail triples (Nice kit ).While I have yet to try their coal loads in my Srewart hoppers ,the coal looks plastic.This can be modified by using dull coat and real coal dust,I think it is a nice add on.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: asychis@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, May 07, 2010 10:16 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Accurail coal loads



Hi y'all,

Accurail advertises coal loads that are supposed to fit the Stewart 70 ton
offset side hopper, and if you buy their 48-load set, it includes a magnet
tool that allows you to remove the loads easily. I understand that the
loads have ball bearings cast into them so the magnet works. Anyone have
experience with these? The price sure seems right. I am most concerned about
fit and looks. I take it if I need to I can add "coal" to the casting one
way or another to simulate different sizes.

Jerry Michels








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Re: Accurail coal loads

Steve SANDIFER
 

I am using a bunch of these for aggregate (limestone quarry). Their 40' ones fit intermountain Caswell gondolas perfectly. It is easy to cut and glue them together to make odd length loads or to lay them on a belt sander (watch your fingers) and shave off enough of the bottom to use them in gondolas, etc.

I don't like the magnet stuff - steel ball bearings that clip into the bottom of the plastic casting. I remove the plastic clips, then glue a large nail in their place. It works much better for magnetic removal.

At Home Depot I purchased some of the "spatter" paint in a spray can. It puts out a nice texture looking paint. If you want to go beyond that, the spatter paint can be used as a base to glue on ballast, fine sand, etc.

The only thing I have not used them for is coal loads.

I have seen better permanent loads. However, I want removable loads which I why I like them so much.

----------------------------------------------------------------
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Dr., Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX
77025, 713-667-9417
Personal: http://www.geocities.com/stevesandifer2000/index
Church: http://www.swcentral.org

----- Original Message -----
From: asychis@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, May 07, 2010 9:16 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Accurail coal loads



Hi y'all,

Accurail advertises coal loads that are supposed to fit the Stewart 70 ton
offset side hopper, and if you buy their 48-load set, it includes a magnet
tool that allows you to remove the loads easily. I understand that the
loads have ball bearings cast into them so the magnet works. Anyone have
experience with these? The price sure seems right. I am most concerned about
fit and looks. I take it if I need to I can add "coal" to the casting one
way or another to simulate different sizes.

Jerry Michels


Re: Burning boxcar photo help

frograbbit602
 

Tim, Thank You for sharing photo. Definitely like the 3/4 view with B end showing. Appreciated.
Lester Breuer

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

FYI, this is from a recent Ebay auction:

http://www.bensonrailphotos.com/2010-03/73581.jpg

Tim O'Connor

At 4/21/2010 11:59 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
There were a lot of variations on the XM-1 design, in ends and roofs and doors and other less visible features, to the point of discussion whether certain cars are or aren't "true" XM-1s. Pat Wider discusses them in RP CYC 18, pp 31-56.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@> wrote:

Lester

I thought all XM-1's had flat plate riveted ends. This car is from
Rock Island 140000-140999 built by AC&F in 1929 w/ dreadnaught ends
and a Murphy radial roof. The classic XM-1 had a peaked roof. I'll
admit in other respects it does look a lot like an XM-1.

Tim O'Connor


Accurail coal loads

asychis@...
 

Hi y'all,

Accurail advertises coal loads that are supposed to fit the Stewart 70 ton
offset side hopper, and if you buy their 48-load set, it includes a magnet
tool that allows you to remove the loads easily. I understand that the
loads have ball bearings cast into them so the magnet works. Anyone have
experience with these? The price sure seems right. I am most concerned about
fit and looks. I take it if I need to I can add "coal" to the casting one
way or another to simulate different sizes.

Jerry Michels


Re: tank and tank-car paints

Robert kirkham
 

Yup you're right Tony. I just have a lot of curiosity about the business and hope to learn more some day - as research allows.

Rob

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Anthony Thompson" <thompson@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 06, 2010 7:11 PM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: tank and tank-car paints

Rob Kirkham wrote:
That's the kind of line where a modeller could easily wonder if the
tank cars moved from one siding to the next - eg. tank car paint to
the tank car manufacturer? I know we've been trained in the last 20
years to reject that sort of move as unprototypical, but it makes me
a bit curious.
Um, I think if they were that close they'd have a pipeline <g>. At
least after WW II. But if you model the teens or twenties, it's a lot
different story--relatively few capable highway freight trucks.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history



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Re: tank and tank-car paints

Robert kirkham
 

The brochure uses an H - thanks for finding that info Kurt. Rob Kirkham


Re: Reading XMw Duryea underframe

william darnaby
 

I do not trust Martin's Duryea instructions for post-war cars. I have built a number of B&O M-55's, O-59's and WM boxcars and Martin's instructions do not match the photos at all. My belief is that he just carried the pre-war, such as the M-53 kit, details forward. Instead I found drawings in a car builders cyc of a car which is clearly an M-55A to use for modelling the Duryea UF. Basically, the issue is that the two angle pieces that span the crossbearers in Martin's instructions are not present in post-war Duryea UF's and that the dead lever either hinged off the back of the cylinder or off a mounting pad on the near crossbearer depending on the road (B&O or WM in my references).

FWIW, I would trust the Speedwitch instructions for any pre-war car. In my experience, using Martin's instructions makes the cylinder hang too low in either pre or post-war applications in comparison to prototype photos.

Bill Darnaby

----- Original Message -----
From: "octoraro1948" <octoraro1@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 06, 2010 11:20 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Reading XMw Duryea underframe


Sunshine's Universal Duryea underframe kit includes both open and solid crossbearers. The instructions indicate that the open ones were "early" and the solid ones came later. Built in 1946, would Reading's XMw boxcars have had the solid crossbearers?

The Reading cars had 8-foot doors. Were the inner crossbearers under the door posts?

I just purchased a photo from Rich Burg of an XMwa taken from a low angle, but the underbody is in shadow and I can't see these details.

Thank you.
Lou Whiteley
Lawrenceville, NJ



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: tank and tank-car paints

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Rob Kirkham wrote:
That's the kind of line where a modeller could easily wonder if the tank cars moved from one siding to the next - eg. tank car paint to the tank car manufacturer? I know we've been trained in the last 20 years to reject that sort of move as unprototypical, but it makes me a bit curious.
Um, I think if they were that close they'd have a pipeline <g>. At least after WW II. But if you model the teens or twenties, it's a lot different story--relatively few capable highway freight trucks.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: tank and tank-car paints

Robert kirkham
 

Sounds interesting for sure Eric. That's the kind of line where a modeller could easily wonder if the tank cars moved from one siding to the next - eg. tank car paint to the tank car manufacturer? I know we've been trained in the last 20 years to reject that sort of move as unprototypical, but it makes me a bit curious.

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Eric Hansmann" <eric@...>
Sent: Thursday, May 06, 2010 10:56 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: tank and tank-car paints

CJ Riley wrote:

It has been 15 years since I lived in Pittsburgh and at least 20 since I was
at the site, but I believe Eagle Paints may have been a facility on the
North Side that still existed (although not operating) in the 1980s. I have
photos somewhere of the facility, with several large vertical tanks on a
siding off the Pennsy mainline in the Manchester neighborhood. IIRC, there
was a brick building, as well. It was definitely a paint company (I believe
there was a sign) and was very modelable.

Anyone know if it is still there or was it a redevelopment victim? Mea
Culpa, I worked for the Redevelopment Authority when I discovered this
little gem.

====================================


CJ,

I can't directly answer your query, but I can add a little more to the
details. I was perusing a 1922 B&O Form 6 book yesterday and reviewing
details of the B&O branch that ran along the Allegheny from Willow Grove
(near Millvale) to the Pressed Steel Car company plant on the Ohio. This
entire 5.9 mile line was under the B&O Allegheny Yard control. There is an
entry for the Eagle Paint & Varnish Co. at mile 3.3. They had a company
siding that held 6 cars, but had a 4 car loading capacity. Nearby were
sidings for the South Ave. Team Track and a siding that served the Vernon D.
Price Co. and American Linseed Co. Also nearby was a siding for The Barrett
Co.

BTW, this is a fascinating stretch of railroad that serves a diverse
industry base, both large and small. H.J. Heinz, Pressed Steel Car Company,
the Pittsburgh works of ALCo, Carnegie Steel's Edith Furnace, the Western
Pennsylvania Penitentiary, and more. The variety of freight cars delivered
along this stretch would have been amazing.

Eric


Eric Hansmann
Chagrin Falls, Ohio
Modeling the railroads of Newburgh, Ohio, circa 1026
http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/





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Re: Reading XMw Duryea underframe

rwitt_2000
 

Lou Whiteley wrote:

Sunshine's Universal Duryea underframe kit includes both open and
solid crossbearers. The instructions indicate that the open ones were
"early" and the solid ones came later. Built in 1946, would Reading's
XMw boxcars have had the solid crossbearers?

The Reading cars had 8-foot doors. Were the inner crossbearers under
the door posts?

I just purchased a photo from Rich Burg of an XMwa taken from a low
angle, but the underbody is in shadow and I can't see these details.

Lou,

The Sunshine instructions are sort of correct, but the B&O possibly was
an exception as they only used cross-bearers constructed from stamped
steel or "solid" ones. Ted Cullotta correctly models these for the B&O
class M-26D/E ARA boxcars built between ~1929-1931. Why some railroad or
car manufacturers initially used fabricated cross-bearers or "open" ones
I cannot say.

My guess would be they should be the "solid" ones and by 1946 the
center-sills should be the standard AAR Zee shaped ones.

Regards,

Bob Witt, Indianapolis, Indiana


Re: tank and tank-car paints

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

There is a 1913 Commodity/Business directory for Pittsburgh on google books.

http://books.google.com/books?id=tAU9AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA129&lpg=PA129&dq=%22eagle+paint+%26+varnish%22+pittsburgh&source=bl&ots=vtK9Mi8vZs&sig=Tay7nH90nzhWKwtaHQ_OiZjSpdE&hl=en&ei=BlHjS8mAJ4P_8Abc9YzGDg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CBcQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=%22eagle%20paint%20%26%20varnish%22%20pittsburgh&f=false

It lists EP&V at 225 Grant Avenue, Tel 244 Cedar.

There is another EP&V color chip sample on ebay, and it uses both Pittsburg and Pittsburgh. The H was returned to the name in 1911, so that is a good indicator that the ebay sample is from around that period, maybe 1911-1915. Which spelling does the tank car coating document use?

KL


CUBAN RR/HERSHEY IN CUBA

brooklynbus <mec-bml@...>
 

GENTLEMAN:Before Castro Hershey had a huge plantation in Cuba and think TRAINS did a article on that operation,plus did the Cuban RR interchange(via ferry)into the USA?Any idea of how many North American freight cars sailed{from Key West and Tampa via WIF} to Cuba(to Hershey and other customers)??
Thanks
Joel Norman


Re: Burning boxcar photo help

Tim O'Connor
 

FYI, this is from a recent Ebay auction:

http://www.bensonrailphotos.com/2010-03/73581.jpg

Tim O'Connor

At 4/21/2010 11:59 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
There were a lot of variations on the XM-1 design, in ends and roofs and doors and other less visible features, to the point of discussion whether certain cars are or aren't "true" XM-1s. Pat Wider discusses them in RP CYC 18, pp 31-56.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Lester

I thought all XM-1's had flat plate riveted ends. This car is from
Rock Island 140000-140999 built by AC&F in 1929 w/ dreadnaught ends
and a Murphy radial roof. The classic XM-1 had a peaked roof. I'll
admit in other respects it does look a lot like an XM-1.

Tim O'Connor


Re: tank and tank-car paints

Eric Hansmann
 

CJ Riley wrote:

It has been 15 years since I lived in Pittsburgh and at least 20 since I was
at the site, but I believe Eagle Paints may have been a facility on the
North Side that still existed (although not operating) in the 1980s. I have
photos somewhere of the facility, with several large vertical tanks on a
siding off the Pennsy mainline in the Manchester neighborhood. IIRC, there
was a brick building, as well. It was definitely a paint company (I believe
there was a sign) and was very modelable.

 Anyone  know if it is still there or was it a redevelopment victim?  Mea
Culpa, I worked for the Redevelopment Authority when I discovered this
little gem.

====================================


CJ,

I can't directly answer your query, but I can add a little more to the
details. I was perusing a 1922 B&O Form 6 book yesterday and reviewing
details of the B&O branch that ran along the Allegheny from Willow Grove
(near Millvale) to the Pressed Steel Car company plant on the Ohio. This
entire 5.9 mile line was under the B&O Allegheny Yard control. There is an
entry for the Eagle Paint & Varnish Co. at mile 3.3. They had a company
siding that held 6 cars, but had a 4 car loading capacity. Nearby were
sidings for the South Ave. Team Track and a siding that served the Vernon D.
Price Co. and American Linseed Co. Also nearby was a siding for The Barrett
Co.

BTW, this is a fascinating stretch of railroad that serves a diverse
industry base, both large and small. H.J. Heinz, Pressed Steel Car Company,
the Pittsburgh works of ALCo, Carnegie Steel's Edith Furnace, the Western
Pennsylvania Penitentiary, and more. The variety of freight cars delivered
along this stretch would have been amazing.

Eric


Eric Hansmann
Chagrin Falls, Ohio
Modeling the railroads of Newburgh, Ohio, circa 1026
http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/





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Photos of Rock Island & SL-SF Refrigerator Cars

Bill Welch
 

In researching the 2+ years that it took to eventually form what would be Western Fruit Express, several western railroads that owned refrigerator cars were mentioned as possible partners with the Great Northern, including the Rock Island and SL-SF. Eventually their cars were judged to be in poor condition by GN, causing them to lose interest and eventually go it alone. I would love to find photographs of the RI and SL-SF reefers to possibly help illustrate this part of the WFE story. Although these talks were occurring from 1921 to 1923, the photos could be after these dates. Although a typical "roster shot" would be good, in service and online somewhere being loaded or unloaded would be a "dream come true."

BTW, the "Frisco Refrigerator Line" is not what I referring to here, which is why I was careful to use "SL-SF"

If anyone knows of a source for photos of these particular refrigerator cars, please contact me at fgexbill@...

Thank you!

Bill Welch


Re: Tank Car Dome Valve Positions

Ed Hawkins
 

On May 6, 2010, at 12:04 PM, octoraro1948 wrote:

ailway Prototype Cyclopedia Volume 3 has several photos of Type 27
tank cars. Some show cars with valves in addition to the safety valves
on the dome, such as Dow Chemical's. I purchased a copy of the Bill of
Materials for Lot 1479 and 1480 that lists these valves. The cars have
the usual two safety valves for cars exceeding 6,650 gallon capacity.
The BOM also lists a relief valve, a 1" air inlet valve, and a 2"
siphon valve.

Ed Kaminski's book includes photos of some of these valve assemblies,
but the diagrams in the book do not illustrate the position of the
extra valves.

If the two safety valves are roughly at 11 o'clock and 1 o'clock,
what are the relative positions of the other three valves -- pressure
relief valve, air inlet valve, and siphon valve? From the photos'
perspective, it looks like the largest valve (2" siphon?) is at 6
o'clock and a smaller one (1" air inlet?) is at about 5 o'clock.
Lou,
There's an ACF drawing in the Museum of Transportation Collection of a
dome & outlet arrangement that applies to lot numbers 1478, 1479, and
1480. The drawing number is 3145109, dated 2/26/36. Contact me off list
if you are interested in obtaining a copy of the drawing, which is
roughly 18" x 24" in overall size.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Tank Car Dome Valve Positions

octoraro1948 <octoraro1@...>
 

Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Volume 3 has several photos of Type 27 tank cars. Some show cars with valves in addition to the safety valves on the dome, such as Dow Chemical's. I purchased a copy of the Bill of Materials for Lot 1479 and 1480 that lists these valves. The cars have the usual two safety valves for cars exceeding 6,650 gallon capacity. The BOM also lists a relief valve, a 1" air inlet valve, and a 2" siphon valve.

Ed Kaminski's book includes photos of some of these valve assemblies, but the diagrams in the book do not illustrate the position of the extra valves.

If the two safety valves are roughly at 11 o'clock and 1 o'clock, what are the relative positions of the other three valves -- pressure relief valve, air inlet valve, and siphon valve? From the photos' perspective, it looks like the largest valve (2" siphon?) is at 6 o'clock and a smaller one (1" air inlet?) is at about 5 o'clock.

Thank you.
Lou Whiteley
Lawrenceville, NJ


Reading XMw Duryea underframe

octoraro1948 <octoraro1@...>
 

Sunshine's Universal Duryea underframe kit includes both open and solid crossbearers. The instructions indicate that the open ones were "early" and the solid ones came later. Built in 1946, would Reading's XMw boxcars have had the solid crossbearers?

The Reading cars had 8-foot doors. Were the inner crossbearers under the door posts?

I just purchased a photo from Rich Burg of an XMwa taken from a low angle, but the underbody is in shadow and I can't see these details.

Thank you.
Lou Whiteley
Lawrenceville, NJ


Conoco Tankcars

SHAY STARK
 

I have been researching Conoco tankcars to determine which paint scheme would be most prevalent in 1950. In looking at a picture in Teds tankcar book I noticed that in the background there is a car that is silver with either black or green lettering. I say green because I have found narrow gauge tankcars that are noted as having green lettering. I have seen a few pictures of black tank cars with both the large white Conoco letering on the side and others with the red triangle logo on the side. Unfortunately the pictures I have found don't seem to have dates on them. I was told that the two AFC type 21 Conoco tankcars that ended up on the Heber Valley Railroad did not have evidence of either logo on the sides.

My question is which paint scheme would be most prevalent in 1950? Would that paintscheme be found on the AFC type 21 tankcars? As a follow up question who makes decals for the paint scheme? I have looked at Champ but they don't have Conoco decals listed on there website. A search of Microscale was not productive either.

Thanks

Shay Stark


Re: Branchline 40' steel CMO (C&NW) boxcar 39092

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

Well...I held off on attaching the roof, but now have some doors to take off and replace with Superior 7-panel doors. As I had a look at my copy of Sept., 1990 MM, page 26. Uh-oh, the photo doesn't lie!! Oh, well, here we go again...That'll teach me to trust the parts in the kit.

Thanks to everyone who replied, and so quickly, too!

All the best,

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Also those particular ACF-built CMO cars had 7 panel Superior doors.
There's a builder photo of 39092 in Mainline Modeler, Sept 1990.

Tim O'Connor


Steve,
The Murphy rectangular raised panel roof is correct for this car.
1. Per a listing on www.steamfreightcars.com titled "1944 AAR 40' Box Car, 10'4" - 10'6" IH, 4-4 Improved Dreadnaught End," CMO 38300-39098 had Murphy (straight) raised panel roofs.
2. The table in Ed Hawkins' article "40-Foot AAR 50-Ton Boxcars with 4/4 Improved Dreadnaught Ends Part 1" in RailModel Journal of Oct 99 shows Murphy rectangular panel roofs for CMO 38300-39098.
Two authoritative sources confirm that the CMO series of your model had the rectangular raised panel roof that Branchline provided, so you're good!
Dave Sieber, Reno NV

--- In STMFC@..., "Steve Lucas" <stevelucas3@> wrote:

I'm putting one of these together, and the kit comes with a raised-panel roof.

Is this roof correct for this 1948-built car, or should it be fitted with a SRECO diagonal panel roof instead?

Thanks in advance,

Steve Lucas.

104581 - 104600 of 194620