Date   

Re: Lost link to modeling a tetra-ethyl lead tank car

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Al Brown wrote:
There was an article in Model Railroader some years ago, about scratchbuilding a Dow Chemical bromine car. Bromine is four times as dense as water, so a 50-ton car runs about 2000 gallons. They look like dachshund puppies.
As Al certainly knows but others may not, the statement applies to LIQUID bromine, not the ordinary gas.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Bromine tank cars (was: Lost link to modeling a tetra-ethyl lead tank car)

al_brown03
 

Looked it up, instead of answering off the top of my head again ... the article's in the 2/01 MRR, p 74; the author is Dick Scott; and the car (DOWX 52312) was built in 1965. I beg the list's pardon.

But, the 1/53 ORER lists DOWX 52301-52304, 50-ton 2000-gallon tank cars, AAR class TPI; 52304 is lined with lead, which (per Kaminski's tank car book, p 247) is suitable for shipping bromine. Bromine is not only dense but low-boiling, so you want a pressurized insulated car. I'd bet these are the predecessors of the car Mr. Scott modelled.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "al_brown03" <abrown@...> wrote:

There was an article in Model Railroader some years ago, about scratchbuilding a Dow Chemical bromine car. Bromine is four times as dense as water, so a 50-ton car runs about 2000 gallons. They look like dachshund puppies.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew Miller" <aslmmiller@> wrote:

Jason, Thanx for the plug ;-)

Dave,

Yes that was me. I only know of one other person who has done small tank cars. I saw photos of his work at a prototype modelers meet. He did beautiful work. Unfortunately I don't remember his name :-(

I made the art work for the wrapper with Powerpoint and printed it on clear plastic. Today I would print it on clear decal paper. The only inobvious detail I did not mention in the caption to the photo of my car is that I cut the tops off the original model's handrail posts, which I was discarding, and used them for the body stantions for the new wire handrails on the tank.

BTW I still have the artwork if you would like it.

regards,

Andy Miller

----- Original Message -----
From: ealabhan0
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, May 17, 2010 7:12 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Lost link to modeling a tetra-ethyl lead tank car



Jason,
You may be thinking of Andrew Miller's 4000gal Ethyl tank car at: http://www.steamfreightcars.com/modeling/models/millera/ebax3064main.html - if that URL doesn't work, go to www.steamfreightcars.com and click the links at left "Modeling," then "Models," then down to click either "Tank Cars" or "Andrew Miller," and finally "EBAX 3064."
Hope this helps,
Dave Sieber, Reno NV

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "HillJason" <hilljason@> wrote:
>
> Greetings all,
> I saw several years ago an on-line article on how to model a Ethyl Corp. (iirc) tank car from a IHC old-time tank car, which I know is now out-of-production, but the article also talked about the author's artwork for the wrapper that he made for it. Anyone with info as to who wrote the article, I would be very thankful to get in contact or even have the article link again.
> Thanks in advance,
> Jason Hill
>







Re: Lost link to modeling a tetra-ethyl lead tank car

al_brown03
 

There was an article in Model Railroader some years ago, about scratchbuilding a Dow Chemical bromine car. Bromine is four times as dense as water, so a 50-ton car runs about 2000 gallons. They look like dachshund puppies.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew Miller" <aslmmiller@...> wrote:

Jason, Thanx for the plug ;-)

Dave,

Yes that was me. I only know of one other person who has done small tank cars. I saw photos of his work at a prototype modelers meet. He did beautiful work. Unfortunately I don't remember his name :-(

I made the art work for the wrapper with Powerpoint and printed it on clear plastic. Today I would print it on clear decal paper. The only inobvious detail I did not mention in the caption to the photo of my car is that I cut the tops off the original model's handrail posts, which I was discarding, and used them for the body stantions for the new wire handrails on the tank.

BTW I still have the artwork if you would like it.

regards,

Andy Miller

----- Original Message -----
From: ealabhan0
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, May 17, 2010 7:12 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Lost link to modeling a tetra-ethyl lead tank car



Jason,
You may be thinking of Andrew Miller's 4000gal Ethyl tank car at: http://www.steamfreightcars.com/modeling/models/millera/ebax3064main.html - if that URL doesn't work, go to www.steamfreightcars.com and click the links at left "Modeling," then "Models," then down to click either "Tank Cars" or "Andrew Miller," and finally "EBAX 3064."
Hope this helps,
Dave Sieber, Reno NV

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "HillJason" <hilljason@> wrote:
>
> Greetings all,
> I saw several years ago an on-line article on how to model a Ethyl Corp. (iirc) tank car from a IHC old-time tank car, which I know is now out-of-production, but the article also talked about the author's artwork for the wrapper that he made for it. Anyone with info as to who wrote the article, I would be very thankful to get in contact or even have the article link again.
> Thanks in advance,
> Jason Hill
>





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Carloads of Coal, was Cinders

Cyril Durrenberger
 

If you really want to do an accurate job of determining the number of cars of coal needed to generate power, you can look at how that is done on my Chemical Engineering 357 class web site at The University of Texas at Austin under part III lecture notes.

http://www.utexas.edu/research/ceer/che357/PDF/Lectures/intro_air_pollution.pdf
 
These the notes I use from my lectures, so there are many comments provided in class.  This course is designed for senior chemical engineers, so there are many assumptions made about the knowledge base for the students.  In calculating the amount of cinders, you can calculate the amount of particulate matter that is emitted througth the stack, calculate the amount of ash in the coal, and the difference will be the amount of bottom ash (cinders).  The example illustrates the process with a typical coal.  The BTU content and ash content for coal vary significantly for coal mined in various parts of the country.  To obtain more examples of various coals and lignites you can look at the coals I use for project 3 that my students have to complete.  These are for coals mostly in use today.
 
http://www.utexas.edu/research/ceer/che357/PDF/Projects/Project3/ChE%20357%202009-project%203%20fuels%20and%20stacks.pdf
 
Most likely a lot more than any of you want, but just to let you know there is a way to determine the amount of coal needed to produce a given amount of power.  Also needed is the efficienty of the power plant.  Coal plants typically have a maximum efficiency of 41%, with older plants being much less than that.
 
Cyril Durrenberger

--- On Mon, 5/17/10, Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@verizon.net> wrote:


From: Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@verizon.net>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Carloads of Coal, was Cinders
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, May 17, 2010, 4:54 PM


 



I imagine there are a number of Google Books entries about the operation of
coal-fired boilers and generators froom the steam era. Certainly these
would give examples of production in pounds of steam or kilowatts / ton of
coal. Probably even the amount of cinders to expect . . .

KL

----- Original Message -----

I guess I do need to clarify what type of industry I'm talking about. I my
case a meat packing plant. There were hundreds of similar sized companies
that made their own power during the time of this list.

Clark Propst







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Lost link to modeling a tetra-ethyl lead tank car

Andrew Miller <aslmmiller@...>
 

Jason, Thanx for the plug ;-)

Dave,

Yes that was me. I only know of one other person who has done small tank cars. I saw photos of his work at a prototype modelers meet. He did beautiful work. Unfortunately I don't remember his name :-(

I made the art work for the wrapper with Powerpoint and printed it on clear plastic. Today I would print it on clear decal paper. The only inobvious detail I did not mention in the caption to the photo of my car is that I cut the tops off the original model's handrail posts, which I was discarding, and used them for the body stantions for the new wire handrails on the tank.

BTW I still have the artwork if you would like it.

regards,

Andy Miller

----- Original Message -----
From: ealabhan0
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, May 17, 2010 7:12 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Lost link to modeling a tetra-ethyl lead tank car



Jason,
You may be thinking of Andrew Miller's 4000gal Ethyl tank car at: http://www.steamfreightcars.com/modeling/models/millera/ebax3064main.html - if that URL doesn't work, go to www.steamfreightcars.com and click the links at left "Modeling," then "Models," then down to click either "Tank Cars" or "Andrew Miller," and finally "EBAX 3064."
Hope this helps,
Dave Sieber, Reno NV

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "HillJason" <hilljason@...> wrote:
>
> Greetings all,
> I saw several years ago an on-line article on how to model a Ethyl Corp. (iirc) tank car from a IHC old-time tank car, which I know is now out-of-production, but the article also talked about the author's artwork for the wrapper that he made for it. Anyone with info as to who wrote the article, I would be very thankful to get in contact or even have the article link again.
> Thanks in advance,
> Jason Hill
>


Re: Carloads of Coal, was Cinders

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

I imagine there are a number of Google Books entries about the operation of coal-fired boilers and generators froom the steam era. Certainly these would give examples of production in pounds of steam or kilowatts / ton of coal. Probably even the amount of cinders to expect . . .

KL

----- Original Message -----

I guess I do need to clarify what type of industry I'm talking about. I my case a meat packing plant. There were hundreds of similar sized companies that made their own power during the time of this list.

Clark Propst


Re: Grain capy

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

A bushel is measure of volume, so at 1 US bushel = 1.2445 cubic feet, you can figure it out for any car or any grain. Converting to pounds will depend on the grain.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Clark and Eileen
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, May 17, 2010 2:17 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Grain capy



Anyone know the bushel capacity of a box car? I know they had grain lines inside, but I know a guy wanting to know the bushels of wheat a car could hold.


Re: Lost link to modeling a tetra-ethyl lead tank car

David Sieber
 

Jason,
You may be thinking of Andrew Miller's 4000gal Ethyl tank car at: http://www.steamfreightcars.com/modeling/models/millera/ebax3064main.html - if that URL doesn't work, go to www.steamfreightcars.com and click the links at left "Modeling," then "Models," then down to click either "Tank Cars" or "Andrew Miller," and finally "EBAX 3064."
Hope this helps,
Dave Sieber, Reno NV

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "HillJason" <hilljason@...> wrote:

Greetings all,
I saw several years ago an on-line article on how to model a Ethyl Corp. (iirc) tank car from a IHC old-time tank car, which I know is now out-of-production, but the article also talked about the author's artwork for the wrapper that he made for it. Anyone with info as to who wrote the article, I would be very thankful to get in contact or even have the article link again.
Thanks in advance,
Jason Hill


Re: Grain capy

rwitt_2000
 

Clark Propst aked:

Anyone know the bushel capacity of a box car? I know they had grain
lines inside, but I know a guy wanting to know the bushels of wheat a
car could hold.
Edward Sutorik replied:

A typical boxcar for grain was 40-6 inside length, 9 inside width, and
10-6 inside height. This yields 3827 cubic feet. This converts to 3076
bushels with the car filled. Weight would be about 92,000 pounds. A
boxcar completely full is hard to believe, so you've got to guess how
un-full the car would be.

Ed,

I haven't checked your calculations, but all the grain lines markings I
have seen were well below the top of the door openings considerably
below the maximum height. I always assumed the loading levels were
established to indicate when the car reached its load limit for a
particular type of grain and that volume was determined by the bulk
density of the grain.

Bob Witt
Indianapolis, Indiana


Re: Chateau Martin Wine Car Photos

brianehni <behni@...>
 

Ditto.

The problem is, almost every car had subtle (or not so subtle) differences. The only "decals" I know of are the dry transfers offered by Cloverhouse.

Brian Ehni

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Jim Lancaster wrote:
I have added 19 new photos of Chateau Martin wine tank cars to my
CMWX web page at
http://coastdaylight.com/chatmart/cmwx_roster_1.html

The new photos show mostly cars not previously covered. Several of
these cars have unusual lettering schemes.

The photos were obtained from Arnold Menke (Arn's Rail Photos).
Thank you, Jim. Excellent coverage. Now if we just had the
decals . . . anyone?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Grain capy

spsalso
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Clark and Eileen" <cepropst@...> wrote:

Anyone know the bushel capacity of a box car? I know they had grain lines inside, but I know a guy wanting to know the bushels of wheat a car could hold.

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
A typical boxcar for grain was 40-6 inside length, 9 inside width, and 10-6 inside height. This yields 3827 cubic feet. This converts to 3076 bushels with the car filled. Weight would be about 92,000 pounds. A boxcar completely full is hard to believe, so you've got to guess how un-full the car would be.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: Chateau Martin Wine Car Photos

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jim Lancaster wrote:
I have added 19 new photos of Chateau Martin wine tank cars to my
CMWX web page at
http://coastdaylight.com/chatmart/cmwx_roster_1.html

The new photos show mostly cars not previously covered. Several of
these cars have unusual lettering schemes.

The photos were obtained from Arnold Menke (Arn's Rail Photos).
Thank you, Jim. Excellent coverage. Now if we just had the decals . . . anyone?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Car Service Division Coal Car Order 411

water.kresse@...
 

Folks,



Could the person who "helped" me with a partial understanding of the Car Service Division Coal Car Order 411 mandating rapid return of coal cars to their home road get back with me again?  What organization's car service division issued the order? AAR/ARA/ICC? . . . and, was it OK to divert the empty coal car to ship iron ore or limestone oe scrap steel or aluminum to a mill going back "directly" towards the originator's intechange?



Thanks,



Al Kresse


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: M&StL box car

Richard Townsend
 

Sorry, that was supposed to be off-list.


Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon

-----Original Message-----
From: richtownsend@netscape.net
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Mon, May 17, 2010 11:23 am
Subject: [STMFC] M&StL box car





Clark,

Just wanted you to know the box car you sent me arrived safely (and quickly -- thanks). You did a really nice job on it.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: UTLX X-3 Tank Length

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Shay Stark wrote:
Thank you very much for your reply. This is exactly what I was looking for. I noticed that the tank capacity in gallons found on the ends of the two 8,000 gallon cars located in the upper Midwest are slightly different. I am wondering if that could be due to slight differences in tank lengths as part of the manufacturing process or due to the cars being built in different lots or possibly by different builders, or if it was just a difference in who determined the capacity?
Tank car cargoes were billed on gallonage, and that precise gallon figure on the end of the car was the basis for such billing (when the car was "shell full," meaning liquid level just at the bottom of the dome opening). In effect, it's as important as the "light weight" on other freight cars. Upon completion of manufacture, each car was measured and the result stenciled on the car end. Numbers varied about one tenth of one percent of the total value, not a terrible variability in manufacture for riveted construction.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


M&StL box car

Richard Townsend
 

Clark,

Just wanted you to know the box car you sent me arrived safely (and quickly -- thanks). You did a really nice job on it.


Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


Grain capy

Clark Propst
 

Anyone know the bushel capacity of a box car? I know they had grain lines inside, but I know a guy wanting to know the bushels of wheat a car could hold.

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: UTLX X-3 Tank Length

SHAY STARK
 

Shay,
The 8,000-gallon UTLX cars had a tank length of 26' 6-1/2" measured
over head rivets and 28' 7-1/4" measured over heads. The 6,500-gallon
UTLX cars had the identical length measured over head rivets but were
3" shorter (28' 4-1/4) measured over heads. Inside tank diameters were
85" and 76", respectively. These dimensions come from AC&F drawings for
lot numbers 1625 and 1534, respectively.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins
Ed,
Thank you very much for your reply. This is exactly what I was looking for. I noticed that the tank capacity in gallons found on the ends of the two 8,000 gallon cars located in the upper Midwest are slightly different. I am wondering if that could be due to slight differences in tank lengths as part of the manufacturing process or due to the cars being built in different lots or possibly by different builders, or if it was just a difference in who determined the capacity?

Thanks again,

Shay Stark


Re: UTLX X-3 Tank Length

Ed Hawkins
 

On May 17, 2010, at 11:11 AM, shaystark wrote:

I am looking for the lengths of the tanks for the 6,500 gallon and the
short 8,000 gallon X-3 cars. Looking at photos of the 6,500 gallon car
in Arizona and the two short 8,000 gallon cars in museums in the upper
Midwest it looks like the lengths may be different. Some of this may
just be the angles that pictures are taken but it looks to me that the
6,500 gallon tank is shorter and thus the porch on the end is more
pronounced. Unfortunately, I am not in a position to make a trip to
measure the cars. I have a couple Intermountain tank car kits that I
want to kit bash into these cars. Yes I know about the Sunshine cars
but since I have these kits I thought this would be a fun challenge. I
am building new frames and bolsters right now but the tanks have me
baffled.
Shay,
The 8,000-gallon UTLX cars had a tank length of 26' 6-1/2" measured
over head rivets and 28' 7-1/4" measured over heads. The 6,500-gallon
UTLX cars had the identical length measured over head rivets but were
3" shorter (28' 4-1/4) measured over heads. Inside tank diameters were
85" and 76", respectively. These dimensions come from AC&F drawings for
lot numbers 1625 and 1534, respectively.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Chateau Martin Wine Car Photos

Paul <buygone@...>
 

Jim:



Very informative, thank you.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Lancaster James
Sent: Monday, May 17, 2010 8:57 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com; milktrains@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Chateau Martin Wine Car Photos





I have added 19 new photos of Chateau Martin wine tank cars to my
CMWX web page at
http://coastdaylight.com/chatmart/cmwx_roster_1.html

The new photos show mostly cars not previously covered. Several of
these cars have unusual lettering schemes.

The photos were obtained from Arnold Menke (Arn's Rail Photos).

Jim Lancaster

99481 - 99500 of 189722