Date   

Re: Color check PRR

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Ron,

       For the CK scheme, you are correct. It will, no doubt, get heavy weathering?

Fred Freitas




________________________________
From: mopacfirst <ron.merrick@fluor.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, June 10, 2010 1:20:45 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Color check PRR

 
i built a Sunshine G29 (PRR, of course) gon and painted it Floquil zinc chromate. I'm planning to letter it in the CK scheme with the decals that came in the kit. Modeling era for me is 1960 (plus a couple of years).

While I know there were discussions about the PRR freight car red color changing over time, I'm not sure I could draw conclusions from what I read. And, I can't see reds very well, so I don't identify these colors by sight very well anyway. And, I have some other Pennsy gons to do, including a couple that I'll paint SK.

Is this the best color? I'll probably weather the car, as one that had been several years since its last paint job.

Ron Merrick


Color check PRR

mopacfirst
 

i built a Sunshine G29 (PRR, of course) gon and painted it Floquil zinc chromate. I'm planning to letter it in the CK scheme with the decals that came in the kit. Modeling era for me is 1960 (plus a couple of years).

While I know there were discussions about the PRR freight car red color changing over time, I'm not sure I could draw conclusions from what I read. And, I can't see reds very well, so I don't identify these colors by sight very well anyway. And, I have some other Pennsy gons to do, including a couple that I'll paint SK.

Is this the best color? I'll probably weather the car, as one that had been several years since its last paint job.

Ron Merrick


Re: New Orleans box cars, 1903, on Shorpy.com

Cyril Durrenberger
 

Has anyone located a photo or otherwise have an idea of the lettering on the side of the SICL box cars?
 
Cyril Durrenberger

--- On Thu, 6/10/10, scottpitzer2002 <scottp459@earthlink.net> wrote:


From: scottpitzer2002 <scottp459@earthlink.net>
Subject: [STMFC] New Orleans box cars, 1903, on Shorpy.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, June 10, 2010, 12:56 AM


 



http://www.shorpy.com/node/8301?size=_original

Southern Iron Car Line, Alabama & Vicksburg, and 2 from Texas & Pacific.

Scott Pitzer


Re: BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jun 10, 2010, at 7:30 AM, rockroll50401 wrote:

I can't remember how long my car's been in service, but I'm sure I
don't remember what color I painted it. Was there any chance some
of the roofs were painted black? When I replace the roof on my car
it would be much easier to paint the new roof black....Just
grabbing for straws : )
Clark Propst
You missed that straw, Clark. The roofs were not black. Often
filthy dirty, yes, but not black.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Clark Propst
 

I can't remember how long my car's been in service, but I'm sure I don't remember what color I painted it. Was there any chance some of the roofs were painted black? When I replace the roof on my car it would be much easier to paint the new roof black....Just grabbing for straws : )
Clark Propst


Re: BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Nelson" <Lake_Muskoka@...> wrote:


I know I've seen this feature on a roof but I can't recall where... pretty
sure it was resin... which, I suppose is a bass-ackward way of asking:
anybody know where such a roof could be obtained?

Dave Nelson
the nicest rendition of a diagonal panel roof with "ZU" eaves is available from Moloco:

http://www.molocotrains.com/catalog/product/gallery/id/13/image/100/

It sould be able to be shortened to the needed length.

Dennis


Spare Box Cars

Armand Premo
 

Does anyone have a surplus Branchline VGN or IHB 40'boxcar in their stash for sale? If so, please contact me off list.Armand Premo


Re: PATCHES was BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Benjamin Hom
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
"I can't figure out why y'all are so intent on reiventing this
wheel."

I've come to the conclusion that many modelers spew tips and techniques that they've never personally tried...


Ben Hom


New Orleans box cars, 1903, on Shorpy.com

Scott Pitzer
 

http://www.shorpy.com/node/8301?size=_original

Southern Iron Car Line, Alabama & Vicksburg, and 2 from Texas & Pacific.

Scott Pitzer


Re: BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jun 9, 2010, at 8:19 PM, rockroll50401 wrote:


After thinking about this for awhile I think I'd rather have the
right roof rather than the roof be right. If I were to use, say a
Red Caboose rectangular panel roof. I would need to add a rivet
line along the edge. Did this roof set flush with the side walls or
more inward like normal?
It was inset, exactly as on the steel reefers of that era.


Richard Hendrickson


Re: BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Paul Lyons
 

Richard,

I am not sure exactly what roof you are talking about, but it sounds the same one as what SP put on there B-50-15's in a 1951 refurbishment project. Look in Tony's Boxcar book there is a great photo (looking down) of a just finished car. If that is the roof in question, Sunshine has the master--good luck getting one out of Martin.

Paul Lyons

-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@opendoor.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wed, Jun 9, 2010 4:48 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: BLI NYC all-steel box cars




On Jun 9, 2010, at 4:13 PM, Dave Nelson wrote:


I know I've seen this feature on a roof but I can't recall where...
pretty
sure it was resin... which, I suppose is a bass-ackward way of asking:
anybody know where such a roof could be obtained?
Dave, the roofs on steel refrigerator cars of that vintage had the
overhanging riveted edges. So it might be possible (depending on
dimensions) to combine the center sections of a couple of PFE or SFRD
refrigerator car roofs to make a box car roof. Just a suggestion; I
haven't tried it and don't know what might be involved.

Richard Hendrickson

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Clark Propst
 

After thinking about this for awhile I think I'd rather have the right roof rather than the roof be right. If I were to use, say a Red Caboose rectangular panel roof. I would need to add a rivet line along the edge. Did this roof set flush with the side walls or more inward like normal?
Thanks for anymore help!
Clark Propst

Clark, in 1954 virtually all of the NYC box cars had their original
roofs replaced. Most of the replacement roofs were Murphy
rectangular panel, but a small number (on cars re-roofed in 1948 and
later) got diagonal panel roofs. In both cases, however, the new
roofs were applied to channel section eaves, not Z-section eaves, so
they had a shallow overhanging riveted lip at the edge. The
Intermountain roofs do not replicate this feature. No doubt it's
possible to kitbash a Westerfield model to accurately represent a ca.
1954 prototype car, but it certainly wouldn't be easy.


Richard Hendrickson





Re: PATCHES was BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

There are always new things coming along, and some of us enjoy trying new things out.

After all, if we didn't reinvent the wheel, our cars would have wooden rollers . . .

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Bruce Smith

I can't figure out why y'all are so intent on reiventing this wheel.


Re: PATCHES was BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,

Parafilm will not stay stuk permanently. It has no adhesive. I can't
figure out why y'all are so intent on reiventing this wheel. Bare metal
foil works great. I use a single layer and it shows up nicely (Although
it is necessary to compensate in painting for the difference in foil and
car colors with a coat of silver or grey on the car. In addition, I
shadow lined the edge with black sharpie)

regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

"Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@verizon.net> 06/09/10 7:55 PM >>>
I think parafilm is wax on a polymer backing. I don't think it would
stick
permanently (which is why it was a good mask - it doesn't lift the lower

layers) nor hold paint.

I haven't seen it in hobby shops in a while. If you have some give it a

try!

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Peter Ness

From my Luftwaffe aircraft modeling experience I found Parafilm a useful
product for masking complex camo schemes. Parafilm is a wax-like
translucent tape and is available from Micro Mark and other sources. To
use it for masking, a section is cut from the roll, one end of the
section is grasped firmly in each hand and it's stretched in length
(200% or more of original cut length), then applied to the area for
masking and trimmed to shape needed for masking. It conforms very well
to surface detail, creates a tacky bond to the model surface and seems
to thin when stretched. I'm thinking that cutting a section, stretching
it, then laying it on the cutting board to cut a patch of the desired
dimensions might yield something suitably thin that conforms to surface
detail and adheres lightly due to its inherent properties. What I don't
know is; how well (or if) it can be permanently bonded to a surface, how
well it takes paint, or if it reacts with common solvents or adhesives
in a negative way....




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: BLI NYC all-steel box cars

rwitt_2000
 


On Jun 9, 2010, at 4:13 PM, Dave Nelson wrote:


I know I've seen this feature on a roof but I can't recall where...
pretty
sure it was resin... which, I suppose is a bass-ackward way of
asking:
anybody know where such a roof could be obtained?
Richard Hendrickson replied:

Dave, the roofs on steel refrigerator cars of that vintage had the
overhanging riveted edges. So it might be possible (depending on
dimensions) to combine the center sections of a couple of PFE or SFRD
refrigerator car roofs to make a box car roof. Just a suggestion; I
haven't tried it and don't know what might be involved.
I believe Branchline Trains made a 50-ft version of this type of roof
with diagonal panels, which may work for those NYC boxcar that received
roofs with diagonal panels. No doubt the part is too wide for the USRA
style cars and would have to be narrowed.

Bob Witt


Re: PATCHES was BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

I think parafilm is wax on a polymer backing. I don't think it would stick permanently (which is why it was a good mask - it doesn't lift the lower layers) nor hold paint.

I haven't seen it in hobby shops in a while. If you have some give it a try!

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Peter Ness

From my Luftwaffe aircraft modeling experience I found Parafilm a useful
product for masking complex camo schemes. Parafilm is a wax-like
translucent tape and is available from Micro Mark and other sources. To
use it for masking, a section is cut from the roll, one end of the
section is grasped firmly in each hand and it's stretched in length
(200% or more of original cut length), then applied to the area for
masking and trimmed to shape needed for masking. It conforms very well
to surface detail, creates a tacky bond to the model surface and seems
to thin when stretched. I'm thinking that cutting a section, stretching
it, then laying it on the cutting board to cut a patch of the desired
dimensions might yield something suitably thin that conforms to surface
detail and adheres lightly due to its inherent properties. What I don't
know is; how well (or if) it can be permanently bonded to a surface, how
well it takes paint, or if it reacts with common solvents or adhesives
in a negative way....


Re: BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jun 9, 2010, at 4:13 PM, Dave Nelson wrote:


I know I've seen this feature on a roof but I can't recall where...
pretty
sure it was resin... which, I suppose is a bass-ackward way of asking:
anybody know where such a roof could be obtained?
Dave, the roofs on steel refrigerator cars of that vintage had the
overhanging riveted edges. So it might be possible (depending on
dimensions) to combine the center sections of a couple of PFE or SFRD
refrigerator car roofs to make a box car roof. Just a suggestion; I
haven't tried it and don't know what might be involved.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jun 9, 2010, at 3:17 PM, rwitt_2000 wrote:

Do we know the specific date when the NYC switched to the "extended"
Gothic style of lettering? The shop date on the phot0 I have must be
very near to the transition date.
Yes, it is. Photos of cars repainted in 8-55 show them with extended
Gothic lettering.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Dave Nelson
 

I know I've seen this feature on a roof but I can't recall where... pretty
sure it was resin... which, I suppose is a bass-ackward way of asking:
anybody know where such a roof could be obtained?

Dave Nelson

-----Original Message-----
In both cases, however, the new
roofs were applied to channel section eaves, not Z-section eaves, so
they had a shallow overhanging riveted lip at the edge. The
Intermountain roofs do not replicate this feature. No doubt it's
possible to kitbash a Westerfield model to accurately represent a ca.
1954 prototype car, but it certainly wouldn't be easy.


Richard Hendrickson
------------------------------------


Re: PATCHES was BLI NYC all-steel box cars

Peter Ness
 

I appreciate all the possible methods being discussed. I haven't had
occasion to try this but perhaps someone else has, or perhaps someone
will;

From my Luftwaffe aircraft modeling experience I found Parafilm a useful
product for masking complex camo schemes. Parafilm is a wax-like
translucent tape and is available from Micro Mark and other sources. To
use it for masking, a section is cut from the roll, one end of the
section is grasped firmly in each hand and it's stretched in length
(200% or more of original cut length), then applied to the area for
masking and trimmed to shape needed for masking. It conforms very well
to surface detail, creates a tacky bond to the model surface and seems
to thin when stretched. I'm thinking that cutting a section, stretching
it, then laying it on the cutting board to cut a patch of the desired
dimensions might yield something suitably thin that conforms to surface
detail and adheres lightly due to its inherent properties. What I don't
know is; how well (or if) it can be permanently bonded to a surface, how
well it takes paint, or if it reacts with common solvents or adhesives
in a negative way....

food for thought,

Peter Ness

101901 - 101920 of 192655