Date   

New From WrightTRAK

seaboard_1966
 

We at WrightTRAK now have decals available for the original Norfolk Southern to go with our lowside gondola. Please go to www.wrighttrak.com to order these or any other of our fine products.

Denis Blake
WrightTRAK Railroad Models

2011 Central Ohio Prototype Modelers Meet, May 5-8

http://www.facebook.com/pages/manage/#!/pages/Central-Ohio-Prototype-Modelers-Meet/326645470797


Re: IC boxcar decal

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

Yes, it is "funny how decals can spur a whole new construction projects".

I bought a set of RailCad decals made by the late Robert W. Smith for a GTW 40' steel, 7' door boxcar. Then I bought a Branchline car to put them on, and found out that Branchline already offers this car decorated for the GTW!!

http://www.branchline-trains.com/blueprint_series/40boxcars/40aar7/40aar7.html

Oh, well... :/

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "mopacfirst" <ron.merrick@...> wrote:

Funny how new decals can spur a whole new construction project.

Starting with an undec IM kit car, I thought about doing one of those infamous square-corner 10'6" boxcars, so I played around with a set of the old DA 5-5 ends for awhile and realized those things were intended to fit an Athearn car back in the days when cutting off molded-on ladders was your only choice. They are sort of vaguely half-way between square and round corner. So, those went into the recycle bin.

Then I realized I had all the parts I needed to do one of the home-built IC cars with riveted sides and P-S roof and ends. IM once sold the various parts separately, when those product lines were new. Back then the parts were even molded in red plastic.

The IM P-S roof and ends fit perfectly on the body. The blank end on the carbody conflicts with the underside of the roof, but I cut away the top of the carbody blank end and the ends appear to be the right distance out with relation to the end of the roof. The nubbins on the inside of the ends had to go, but the height and width match the body perfectly. It appears to me that the prototypes, built in the mid-fifties, have an AAR underframe so I used the IM part from the 10'6" car after removing the extra six inches of height from the body bolster by filing it to the same height as the centersill. I add a piece of .010 material to form the truck bearing surface, which puts the car at about the correct height.

Back to the square corner 5-5, I'm still thinking about that one.

Ron Merrick


Re: Atlas 1932 box cars

Brian Carlson
 

Roof is molded with the sides, at least on the Erie model I had apart. Frame is metal which is a slight pain since the location of the brake components is totally wrong on the Erie car.
 
I haven't seen the C&O car yet.
 
Brian J. Carlson

--- On Wed, 6/23/10, ed_mines <ed_mines@yahoo.com> wrote:


From: ed_mines <ed_mines@yahoo.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Atlas 1932 box cars
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, June 23, 2010, 2:59 PM


 



Is the roof a separate piece?

If it is how's the width compared to a Red caboose X29 shell?



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Atlas 1932 box cars

ed_mines
 

Is the roof a separate piece?

If it is how's the width compared to a Red caboose X29 shell?

Anyone see a preproduction sample of the C&O/NKP round roof version?

Ed Mines


Re: Professor Maury N. Klein (URI) <was> Gould Railroad Standard Woo

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Denny Anspach wrote:
That he made most of his ubiquitous inspection tours over the UP and SP occupying his favorite ILLINOIS CENTRAL office car reminds the reader once again of the important role that this still-important mid-America line played, and was still playing in the vast railroad games of the period.
Even while holding titles as President of both UP and SP, and serving as Board Chairman for UP, with all the administrative direction of the Associated Lines in his hands, Harriman did continue to hold his seat on the IC Board, which he had held for years prior to the UP takeover (and he also retained his extensive amount of IC stock). But he only obtained actual control of the IC for a short period very late in his life, and that control was financial, not managerial; IC was never part of the Associated Lines. I don't disagree with what Denny says, but do not want any misunderstanding to develop of the position of the IC relative to the Associated Lines. There is already too much of that <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Professor Maury N. Klein (URI) <was> Gould Railroad Standard Woo

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

I would agree with Tony Thompson that Maury Klein's biography of E.H. Harriman should be on one's "must-read" lists of essential substantive railroad history books. The book is both well written and a very good read to boot; and Klein makes a very exciting story of Harriman's central role in the unfolding and quite amazing broad canvas of western/northwestern railroad expansion and rivalries over the 20 years or so bridging the turn of the last century. That Harriman was a very interesting, often sympathetic, and a surprising renaissance man just by himself, is only additive to the story. A great deal of the primary sources for Klein arose from long forgotten, serendiptiously-newly-found papers and manuscripts, an absorbing story-within-a- story all by itself.

That almost alone among railroad barons of the time Harriman would aggressively (some would say "ruinously") ramp up expenditures for track, line, infrastructure, route improvements and expansion during the serious national economic downturns of the time ("so we will be ready to immediately profit when the downturn is over") graphically explained for me why the Harriman roads were deemed so powerful.

That he made most of his ubiquitous inspection tours over the UP and SP occupying his favorite ILLINOIS CENTRAL office car reminds the reader once again of the important role that this still-important mid- America line played, and was still playing in the vast railroad games of the period.

That Harriman hosted John Muir -and substantially enabled some Muir's historic conservation efforts, and greatly advanced the science and knowledge of Alaska's natural history was again quite enlightening. These were done via Harriman's personal charter of a steamship in 1899 for a two month Alaska cruise with the passengers some of the most eminent natural scientists of the time.

I will attest that the three railroads mentioned all operated large fleets of Steam Era Freight Cars. If such were not specifically mentioned, they were certainly implied.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Re: IC boxcar decal

Clark Propst
 

I bought the square corner Sunshine minikit last N'ville for a friend, finally got an undec IM AAR 42 car in the mail from Stan and sent my friend the link to Jerry's decal.

I love it when a play comes together...for someone else...

Clark Propst


Re: IC boxcar decal

Staffan Ehnbom <staffan.ehnbom@...>
 

For me it was the other way around. I started modelling an IC square corner box and asked the list for a tip for a good decal and Jerry decided to start a whole new decal project. It is a lot smarter to start with a decal and find a correct model to put it on like you do. I was just lucky this time.

Staffan Ehnbom

----- Original Message -----
From: mopacfirst
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, June 23, 2010 3:17 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: IC boxcar decal



Funny how new decals can spur a whole new construction project.

Starting with an undec IM kit car, I thought about doing one of those infamous square-corner 10'6" boxcars, so I played around with a set of the old DA 5-5 ends for awhile and realized those things were intended to fit an Athearn car back in the days when cutting off molded-on ladders was your only choice. They are sort of vaguely half-way between square and round corner. So, those went into the recycle bin.

Then I realized I had all the parts I needed to do one of the home-built IC cars with riveted sides and P-S roof and ends. IM once sold the various parts separately, when those product lines were new. Back then the parts were even molded in red plastic.

The IM P-S roof and ends fit perfectly on the body. The blank end on the carbody conflicts with the underside of the roof, but I cut away the top of the carbody blank end and the ends appear to be the right distance out with relation to the end of the roof. The nubbins on the inside of the ends had to go, but the height and width match the body perfectly. It appears to me that the prototypes, built in the mid-fifties, have an AAR underframe so I used the IM part from the 10'6" car after removing the extra six inches of height from the body bolster by filing it to the same height as the centersill. I add a piece of .010 material to form the truck bearing surface, which puts the car at about the correct height.

Back to the square corner 5-5, I'm still thinking about that one.

Ron Merrick


Re: IC boxcar decal

mopacfirst
 

Funny how new decals can spur a whole new construction project.

Starting with an undec IM kit car, I thought about doing one of those infamous square-corner 10'6" boxcars, so I played around with a set of the old DA 5-5 ends for awhile and realized those things were intended to fit an Athearn car back in the days when cutting off molded-on ladders was your only choice. They are sort of vaguely half-way between square and round corner. So, those went into the recycle bin.

Then I realized I had all the parts I needed to do one of the home-built IC cars with riveted sides and P-S roof and ends. IM once sold the various parts separately, when those product lines were new. Back then the parts were even molded in red plastic.

The IM P-S roof and ends fit perfectly on the body. The blank end on the carbody conflicts with the underside of the roof, but I cut away the top of the carbody blank end and the ends appear to be the right distance out with relation to the end of the roof. The nubbins on the inside of the ends had to go, but the height and width match the body perfectly. It appears to me that the prototypes, built in the mid-fifties, have an AAR underframe so I used the IM part from the 10'6" car after removing the extra six inches of height from the body bolster by filing it to the same height as the centersill. I add a piece of .010 material to form the truck bearing surface, which puts the car at about the correct height.

Back to the square corner 5-5, I'm still thinking about that one.

Ron Merrick


Re: Professor Maury N. Klein (URI) <was> Gould Railroad Standard Wooden Cabooses -

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Mike Carson wrote:
I always appreciate leads to authors presenting alternate interpretations of accepted fact, particularly those I was unaware of. Professor Klein appears to a prolific author, who it appears has a donated collection at the St. Louis Mercantile Library. His paper, Jay Gould: A Revisionist Interpretation, (available on line) makes a cogent argument that the elder Gould isn't fully appreciated. I am more likely to read Professor Klein's book about Harriman rather Gould. As it appears George Gould, the son, was completely outclassed Harriman, both as a businessman and a railroad tycoon.
There is extremely little about George Gould in Klein's book about Jay Gould. Don't let your opinion of George affect the chance to learn something accurate about Jay. But Klein's Harriman book is excellent too.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Wabash AC& F Cabooses circa 1925-27 <was> Gould Standard Wooden Cabooses -

mbcarson2002
 

Thank you for the information, Victor

Did the special issue give you any insight into Wabash cabooses that might have built during the Gould era? IIRC, George Gould lost control of the roads he controlled (including the Wabash) circa 1911 - 1912. Some of the AC&F cabooses were delivered to Missouri Pacific just about the time Gould was losing control.

Mike Carson

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "wabash2813" <reporterllc@...> wrote:



Chet French would probably have more detailed info but the wooden Wabash cabooses that looked very much like a Mopac caboose were known by railroaders and fans as the "Twenty-Six Hundreds". They were numbered 2600 to 2654 with the first twenty five cars build by American Car & Foundry and the balance by the Wabash. This is per a special Banner caboose magazine issue wrtitten by Dr. C.C. Drake, Jr., back in 1994. If you have an interest in critical dimensions for comparisons I can provide those here too. They were built from 1925 to 1927.

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana


Professor Maury N. Klein (URI) <was> Gould Railroad Standard Wooden Cabooses -

mbcarson2002
 

Tony,

I always appreciate leads to authors presenting alternate interpretations of accepted fact, particularly those I was unaware of. Professor Klein appears to a prolific author, who it appears has a donated collection at the St. Louis Mercantile Library. His paper, Jay Gould: A Revisionist Interpretation, (available on line) makes a cogent argument that the elder Gould isn't fully appreciated. I am more likely to read Professor Klein's book about Harriman rather Gould. As it appears George Gould, the son, was completely outclassed Harriman, both as a businessman and a railroad tycoon.

Mike Carson

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Mike Carson wrote:
I'll suggest the Gould family (Jay & later George) practiced an
extractive management style where the stockholder dividend was
paramount and every thing else secondary.
If you really think this about Jay Gould, you need to read
Maury Klein's bio of Gould, which explodes many of the tired and
inaccurate jibes directed at Jay for decades. George, on the other
hand, appears to have been either incompetent or consumed with visions
of impossible glory. There's little evidence George generated much in
the way of dividends to anyone but himself.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Gould Railroad Standard Wooden Cabooses -

reporterllc
 

Chet French would probably have more detailed info but the wooden Wabash cabooses that looked very much like a Mopac caboose were known by railroaders and fans as the "Twenty-Six Hundreds". They were numbered 2600 to 2654 with the first twenty five cars build by American Car & Foundry and the balance by the Wabash. This is per a special Banner caboose magazine issue wrtitten by Dr. C.C. Drake, Jr., back in 1994. If you have an interest in critical dimensions for comparisons I can provide those here too. They were built from 1925 to 1927.

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana


Re: Mystery Boxcar

Gary Roe
 

Olin Dirks wrote:

Along the old Wabash near Minneola Iowa, are three wrecked boxcars lying on
their sides tilted down into a gully.



Olin,

I can't help you with identifying the car; but the Wabash commonly used old,
tired box cars for embankment protection along major creeks and streams. If
you walk the Wabash Trace Trail northward (railroad west) from Malvern,
Iowa, you can see a number of cars in Silver Creek, including an x-Pennsy
round roof car the Wabash bought second hand. This is best done in the
Winter or very early Spring, as the underbrush was extremely thick last time
I was there.

gary roe

quincy, illinois


Mystery Boxcar

olin4812
 

Along the old Wabash near Minneola Iowa, are three wrecked boxcars lying on their sides tilted down into a gully. One appears to be a N&W B-5 or similar (flat X29 type roof, 5-4 blank W corner post ends, full length side sill with slight fish belly. The other one is a classic steel side rebuild of a USRA single sheathed boxcar with underframe widening gussets, 4:4 sides and a high tack board like the Wabash cars.

The third car however, is a bit of a mystery to me:

50', Enterprise type ends, diagonal panel roof, double youngstown doors, DF rails, full length side sills that extend all the way to the car end and 4 channels on the center sill, possibly an early sliding center sill. The ends have the remains of some black car cement on them. No paint markings remain on any of the cars. With a diagonal panel roof and Enterprise ends, it's clearly a rebuild of some type.

Anyone have any ideas of what this car might be, or what it was rebuilt from? Also, if it turns out this car was a post 1960 rebuild, my apologies for posting this question on the list!

Olin Dirks
Omaha, NE


IC boxcar decal

jerryglow2
 

The Illinois Central boxcar decal set that was the subject of much discussion and help recently is now available. See:
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/samples/IC.jpg
or whole line at http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/decals

Jerry Glow


Painting Tips from Military Modelers

Bill Welch
 

This link takes one to the Armorama Website page with an index of articles, including one group called "Most Read" which has several very good articles on painting.

http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=Sections&file=index

Bill Welch


Re: Gould Railroad Standard Wooden Cabooses -

asychis@...
 

Tony writes: "If you really think this about Jay Gould, you need to read
Maury Klein's bio of Gould, which explodes many of the tired and
inaccurate jibes directed at Jay for decades."

I strongly agree, Klein's book is a must read.

As to the question at hand, there might not have been a "Gould Standard",
but boy oh boy were some of those cabooses built with similar features.
MP, Wabash, T&P, D&RG and WP all had cabooses of similar design, although as
others have said, they were not Model "T's" rolling off a production line.

Jerry Michels


Re: What tank cars would be most appropriate . . .

Bruce Smith
 

On Jun 22, 2010, at 12:18 AM, Jim Betz wrote:
P.S. Finding appropriate cars for pre-WWII freight cars - even
just box cars - can be an exercise in frustration control.
Some times it is even difficult to find an "adequate stand
in" for anything before 1935. Or decals.
Jim,

HUH? Perhaps in RTR, but in kits? Can you say "Westerfield"?! <VBG> And Sunshine, F&C, Speedwitch, Red Caboose, P2K Bowser... etc After all, many of the cars for my 1944 date are pre-war. There are a significant number of pre-1935 models available out there. This is true for stock cars, tank cars, reefers, hoppers, and gons as well (less so but still true for flats as well). Yes, there are some holes in the pre-1935 house-cars available, but the number of significant ones is pretty small.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
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Re: [Gould Railroad Standard Wooden Cabooses

jerryglow2
 

MP's Magors and clones vary considerably in the end platform detail and steps as can be seen in my modified one:
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/more/Magor.html

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "cvlk" <cvlk@...> wrote:

The Magor design caboose that Atlas offers in HO and N is a mini-standard (PM, C&EI, C&O, MP) but AFAIK the PM, C&O and NKP didn't order any cars as a Van Sweringen "standard".
Morrison had a modular design steel caboose but the length, window arrangement, cupola/bay window/none, etc.. could be cusomized so that no two looked alike.... EJ&E and BRC are examples of how different they could look. Kato's "Shorty" caboose in N (Cambria & Indiana prototype was released; BRC transfer style was planned as was a bay window (LI) version but they were not).
Charlie Vlk

----- Original Message -----
From: Tim O'Connor
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, June 21, 2010 6:09 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: [Gould Railroad Standard Wooden Cabooses




The Van Sweringen roads didn't share any caboose designs?

At 6/21/2010 06:49 PM Monday, you wrote:
>The "Harriman" (UP CA, SP???) is the only "standard" wood caboose I am aware of.
>St. Charles car company built cars for the CB&Q, MP, CM, and others that were pretty much alike (like the Morrison-International "Wide Vision" cars are similar) but not identical.
>The so-called "USRA" wood caboose may be close but I haven't seen any study on the pedigree of that family to say if it qualifies as a "standard", even the steel version has about as many variations as the ATSF "1900" clones (WAB, Alton, CRR, etc..).
>Charlie Vlk





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