Date   

Re: Jerry Glow's ART Cars

jerryglow2
 

I mistakenly bought Polyscale D&RGW Yellow which turned out to be way too orange so mixed it 50-50 with ModelFlex Insignia Yellow (yes they mix fine). If I were doing it from start, I'd use all ModelFlex perhaps their ATSF yellow in place of the Polyscale. You can play with the proportions as there was considerable variety in the fleet esp over time as evidenced by the article from the MPHS The Eagle
http://amarillorailmuseum.com/Winter%202003%20ART%20Article%20Reduced.pdf

The slight color difference between my two painted ones on top compared to the factory painted one on the bottom are probably due more to lighting etc as the picture was taken the next day.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "John" <golden1014@...> wrote:

Jerry,

Can you please tell me what yellow you used for your ART cars?

Thanks,
John

John Golden
Bloomington, IN


Re: Branchline and other box cars offerings

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

Gene Green writes:

The thing that puzzles me is why models get sent all the way to China for
assembly. That seems to add about $10.00 to the price of each car.
Couldn't some enterprising, Spanish-speaking model railroader set up a kit
assembly plant in Mexico? Shipment costs would be lower and transit times
shorter.
If I remember they thought about building brass in Mexico a long time ago. For some reason building models in Mexico just didn't work. Not sure why, as it seems like a great idea!

--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Jerry Glow's ART Cars

golden1014
 

Jerry,

Can you please tell me what yellow you used for your ART cars?

Thanks,
John

John Golden
Bloomington, IN

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, jerryglow@... wrote:

Neat assembly of prepainted kits (at least for me) is not all that easy esp those containing tiny parts that need to be glued. I recently assembled my ART reefer kit purchased from the Amarillo RR Museum and had so much trouble getting good adhesion of the roof details I wound up stripping the roof and ends so I could assemble them as raw plastic. Luckily I found a perfect match for the roof/end color while I was doing a kitbashed R40-10 clone. I did loose the end lettering but made decals of what had been on them. See my ART project in progress at:
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/modeling/ART_steel_reefers.html

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@> wrote:

I think the facts that most model railroaders have 2 lifetime supplies of kits and that they ruin many of those kits when they try to build them are mostly responsible for the demise of kits. Better to buy one built up model and enjoy it on the shelf than have 3 more in boxes in the closet.

Now if we had some new blood coming into the hobby they'd be building up collections of boxes in the closet but that's not the case.

It must be tough on new guys to pay big bucks for everything.

Atleast they're potential customers for kits in the closet.

Ed


Re: Branchline and other box cars offerings

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Speaking for a friend of mine that interacts with assembly businesses all
over the world, he finds that assembly in parts of Asia can't be beat, and
that assembly in Mexico has far more "issues" (ruined final products) than
those assembled in China, India and Pakistan. Shipment costs amount to FAR
less than labor in assembly, so he finds it cheaper by far to ship to China
for assembly than other options. That will change as labor rates continue to
soar in China.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Dave
Nelson
Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 12:12 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Branchline and other box cars offerings





Gene Green writes:

The thing that puzzles me is why models get sent all the way to China for
assembly. That seems to add about $10.00 to the price of each car.
Couldn't some enterprising, Spanish-speaking model railroader set up a kit
assembly plant in Mexico? Shipment costs would be lower and transit times
shorter.
------------------------

Dave Nelson replies:
The Yuan will likely continue rise against the Dollar over the next decade
-- as will Chinese labor expenses -- making Chinese Manufacturing less of a
good deal. Who knows... it may turn out shipping plastic freight cars from
Mexico (in real freight cars) becomes a viable alternative.

Dave Nelson


Re: Branchline and other box cars offerings

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

You guys are right. The costs of transportation for high value commodities
are a drop in the bucket. One can generally ship one Twenty-Foot Equivalent
Unit (TEU) container from China to the U.S. for about $1000, so all told, it
would be about 1% of the cost of the product, wholesale. Even shipping raw
materials in containers now makes sense.

BTW, what size container ships from LA to Chicago for $1000?

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul
Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 3:18 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Branchline and other box cars offerings



Tim:

You are close but no cigars. RTR freight cars in their packaging will not
allow you to get 50,000 lbs into even a 53' container. You will cube out
before you weight out. I question even with a full container of say Lionel
locomotives you will come anywhere near to your 50,000 lb mark. But you are
correct both the rail and water costs are quite low. I think that your per
unit cost will be closer to $.10 each. Just my thoughts.

Paul C. Koehler

_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of
Tim O'Connor
Sent: Thursday, June 24, 2010 10:59 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Branchline and other box cars offerings

Global trade and containerization has chopped the cost of transport to the
bone. You guys need to get out and watch more trains!

I think it costs about $1000 to send a container from LA to Chicago... that
could be 50000 lbs of trains, say 100,000 models, or... 1 cent per model, to
ship it 2,000 miles by rail! And ships charge much less than railroads (per
mile).

Tim O'

Gene Green writes:

The thing that puzzles me is why models get sent all the way to China
for assembly. That seems to add about $10.00 to the price of each car.
Couldn't some enterprising, Spanish-speaking model railroader set up a
kit assembly plant in Mexico? Shipment costs would be lower and transit
times shorter.
------------------------

Dave Nelson replies:
The Yuan will likely continue rise against the Dollar over the next
decade
-- as will Chinese labor expenses -- making Chinese Manufacturing less
of a good deal. Who knows... it may turn out shipping plastic freight
cars from Mexico (in real freight cars) becomes a viable alternative.

Dave Nelson
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: demise of kits

Dennis Williams
 

I add as much as I can to my inventory!! Building my own equipment is a little on the slow side  for I am building for everyone else.
  One thing of interest, I have not become bored with building the resin kits. As long as people need them built, I will keep building!!! 
  As for Sunshine and Westerfield hanging it up, the price of 2nd hand kits have really spiked  within the last few months.
Dennis Williams / Owner
Resinbuilders4u.com

--- On Thu, 6/24/10, tmolsen@UDel.Edu <tmolsen@UDel.Edu> wrote:


From: tmolsen@UDel.Edu <tmolsen@UDel.Edu>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: demise of kits
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, June 24, 2010, 11:57 PM


 



Brian,

I wouldn't worry about collecting kits as someday in the near future we are going to lose Sunshine to retirement (Tricia will be 65 next year and she has hinted at retirement) and Al Westerfield is closing and retiring at the end of April 2011.

I have approximately 1100 urethane kits and almost 1000 plastic injection kits. In the next year I will thin out the plastic heavily as the urethane kits now duplicate most of the plastic in my 1953 time frame.

Some needle me about having so many unbuilt kits, but so what! If you like freight cars, there are so many railroads and so many different cars. When you lived almost your entire life around the railroad as I have, freight cars have been like old friends. Having a large inventory allows me the ability to pick and choose what I want to build when I want to build it, not having to wait until I can buy it somewhere and hoping that the manufacturer will still be in business.

Built up cars are fine, but many still leave you having to modify and in many cases repaint or renumber them!

Also, I like to invoke a line that Richard Hendrickson once said on this list when this type of string came up in the past: "When I see a freight car kit I like, I buy it and put in my basement! If I do not get to build it, then it is my heirs problem! Amen brother!

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu
54 years as a modeler and railfan: 38.5 years as a professional railroader!











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Green Marked Coal

Armand Premo
 

Blue coal a big seller.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: asychis@aol.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, June 25, 2010 12:33 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Green Marked Coal



OK, in ads for Green Marked Coal, was the coal actually marked green in
obvious some way, and how would this be simulated for a model? Were there
other colors other than green?

Jerry Michels











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Re: Branchline and other box cars offerings

Paul <buygone@...>
 

Tim:



You are close but no cigars. RTR freight cars in their packaging will not
allow you to get 50,000 lbs into even a 53' container. You will cube out
before you weight out. I question even with a full container of say Lionel
locomotives you will come anywhere near to your 50,000 lb mark. But you are
correct both the rail and water costs are quite low. I think that your per
unit cost will be closer to $.10 each. Just my thoughts.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tim
O'Connor
Sent: Thursday, June 24, 2010 10:59 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Branchline and other box cars offerings






Global trade and containerization has chopped the cost of transport
to the bone. You guys need to get out and watch more trains!

I think it costs about $1000 to send a container from LA to
Chicago... that could be 50000 lbs of trains, say 100,000 models,
or... 1 cent per model, to ship it 2,000 miles by rail! And
ships charge much less than railroads (per mile).

Tim O'

Gene Green writes:

The thing that puzzles me is why models get sent all the way to China for
assembly. That seems to add about $10.00 to the price of each car.
Couldn't some enterprising, Spanish-speaking model railroader set up a kit
assembly plant in Mexico? Shipment costs would be lower and transit times
shorter.
------------------------

Dave Nelson replies:
The Yuan will likely continue rise against the Dollar over the next decade
-- as will Chinese labor expenses -- making Chinese Manufacturing less of a
good deal. Who knows... it may turn out shipping plastic freight cars from
Mexico (in real freight cars) becomes a viable alternative.

Dave Nelson


Re: demise of kits

tmolsen@...
 

Brian,

I wouldn't worry about collecting kits as someday in the near future we are going to lose Sunshine to retirement (Tricia will be 65 next year and she has hinted at retirement) and Al Westerfield is closing and retiring at the end of April 2011.

I have approximately 1100 urethane kits and almost 1000 plastic injection kits. In the next year I will thin out the plastic heavily as the urethane kits now duplicate most of the plastic in my 1953 time frame.

Some needle me about having so many unbuilt kits, but so what! If you like freight cars, there are so many railroads and so many different cars. When you lived almost your entire life around the railroad as I have, freight cars have been like old friends. Having a large inventory allows me the ability to pick and choose what I want to build when I want to build it, not having to wait until I can buy it somewhere and hoping that the manufacturer will still be in business.

Built up cars are fine, but many still leave you having to modify and in many cases repaint or renumber them!

Also, I like to invoke a line that Richard Hendrickson once said on this list when this type of string came up in the past: "When I see a freight car kit I like, I buy it and put in my basement! If I do not get to build it, then it is my heirs problem! Amen brother!

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu
54 years as a modeler and railfan: 38.5 years as a professional railroader!


Re: Green Marked Coal

al_brown03
 

There sure *were* colors other than green, and in addition to black! :-) For example, check out "blue coal" in the group archive. (I don't know all the colors that were used.) The idea was to create brand loyalty, a steam-era version of putting a tiger in your tank.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, George Frey <orangetrainman33@...> wrote:

YES BLACK
 George  F                                                                               




________________________________
From: "asychis@..." <asychis@...>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, June 24, 2010 9:33:35 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Green Marked Coal

 
OK, in ads for Green Marked Coal, was the coal actually marked green in
obvious some way, and how would this be simulated for a model? Were there
other colors other than green?

Jerry Michels












[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Branchline and other box cars offerings

Tim O'Connor
 

Global trade and containerization has chopped the cost of transport
to the bone. You guys need to get out and watch more trains!

I think it costs about $1000 to send a container from LA to
Chicago... that could be 50000 lbs of trains, say 100,000 models,
or... 1 cent per model, to ship it 2,000 miles by rail! And
ships charge much less than railroads (per mile).

Tim O'

Gene Green writes:

The thing that puzzles me is why models get sent all the way to China for
assembly. That seems to add about $10.00 to the price of each car.
Couldn't some enterprising, Spanish-speaking model railroader set up a kit
assembly plant in Mexico? Shipment costs would be lower and transit times
shorter.
------------------------

Dave Nelson replies:
The Yuan will likely continue rise against the Dollar over the next decade
-- as will Chinese labor expenses -- making Chinese Manufacturing less of a
good deal. Who knows... it may turn out shipping plastic freight cars from
Mexico (in real freight cars) becomes a viable alternative.

Dave Nelson


Re: demise of kits

jerryglow2
 

Neat assembly of prepainted kits (at least for me) is not all that easy esp those containing tiny parts that need to be glued. I recently assembled my ART reefer kit purchased from the Amarillo RR Museum and had so much trouble getting good adhesion of the roof details I wound up stripping the roof and ends so I could assemble them as raw plastic. Luckily I found a perfect match for the roof/end color while I was doing a kitbashed R40-10 clone. I did loose the end lettering but made decals of what had been on them. See my ART project in progress at:
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/modeling/ART_steel_reefers.html

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

I think the facts that most model railroaders have 2 lifetime supplies of kits and that they ruin many of those kits when they try to build them are mostly responsible for the demise of kits. Better to buy one built up model and enjoy it on the shelf than have 3 more in boxes in the closet.

Now if we had some new blood coming into the hobby they'd be building up collections of boxes in the closet but that's not the case.

It must be tough on new guys to pay big bucks for everything.

Atleast they're potential customers for kits in the closet.

Ed


Re: NP Truss Rod Reefers

Richard Hendrickson
 

Col. Chet McCoid photo, Tacoma, WA 2/55, Bob's Photo Service
collection.


Re: NP Truss Rod Reefers

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jun 24, 2010, at 2:20 PM, cobrapsl@aol.com wrote:

Richard,

Thanks for getting me straight. Now, in your vast array of frieght
car photos do you have a picture of one of these reefers in the
late 40's, early 50's?
Unfortunately, I don't. The two photos I have both date from the
late 1930s. I'm attaching one of those, from the Joe Collias
collection, as well as a photo of a nearly identical car but without
the side sill truss rods that was taken at San Francisco in 1941 by
Will Whittaker, as it shows the P/L scheme that was adopted in that
year. I also have a shot of a similar car in the same P/L
scheme,somewhat weathered, in 1953 which I'll attach to another e-mail.

Richard Hendrickson




Re: Green Marked Coal

George Frey <orangetrainman33@...>
 

YES BLACK
 George  F                                                                               




________________________________
From: "asychis@aol.com" <asychis@aol.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, June 24, 2010 9:33:35 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Green Marked Coal

 
OK, in ads for Green Marked Coal, was the coal actually marked green in
obvious some way, and how would this be simulated for a model? Were there
other colors other than green?

Jerry Michels




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Branchline and other box cars offerings

Dave Nelson
 

Gene Green writes:

The thing that puzzles me is why models get sent all the way to China for
assembly. That seems to add about $10.00 to the price of each car.
Couldn't some enterprising, Spanish-speaking model railroader set up a kit
assembly plant in Mexico? Shipment costs would be lower and transit times
shorter.
------------------------

Dave Nelson replies:
The Yuan will likely continue rise against the Dollar over the next decade
-- as will Chinese labor expenses -- making Chinese Manufacturing less of a
good deal. Who knows... it may turn out shipping plastic freight cars from
Mexico (in real freight cars) becomes a viable alternative.

Dave Nelson


Re: demise of kits

Brian Carlson
 

How the heck did I type that? I'm 37, and just received two more HO P2k flat
cars I purchased from the HO Yardsale group. Those lamenting kits need to
check that group out (Type HO Yardsale in Yahoo groups) also a lot of p2k
kits have been appearing on Ebay at reasonable prices lately, kinda odd,
lots of tank cars. Kits are out there. Plus our own Andy Carlson (No
relation) almost always has kits.



Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY

prrk41361@yahoo.com



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
lnbill
Sent: Thursday, June 24, 2010 9:46 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: demise of kits





I don't know Brian, if you are really one thousand, nine hundred and thirty
seven years old, I am very impressed that not only can you still build these
kit but you are looking into the future.

And you consider yourself relatively young. What a great attitude and
perspective!

Bill Welch


Re: Red BallReefers

Thomas Vanderlip <thomasvanderlip@...>
 

Stan,
You are absolutely right. Darn, not this is going to bug me until I remember..

Thom


Re: Branchline and other box cars offerings

Rhbale@...
 

I think Vietnam and India are next in line.
Richard Bale

In a message dated 6/24/2010 10:58:50 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
timboconnor@comcast.net writes:





Global trade and containerization has chopped the cost of transport
to the bone. You guys need to get out and watch more trains!

I think it costs about $1000 to send a container from LA to
Chicago... that could be 50000 lbs of trains, say 100,000 models,
or... 1 cent per model, to ship it 2,000 miles by rail! And
ships charge much less than railroads (per mile).

Tim O'

Gene Green writes:

The thing that puzzles me is why models get sent all the way to China for
assembly. That seems to add about $10.00 to the price of each car.
Couldn't some enterprising, Spanish-speaking model railroader set up a kit
assembly plant in Mexico? Shipment costs would be lower and transit times
shorter.
------------------------

Dave Nelson replies:
The Yuan will likely continue rise against the Dollar over the next decade
-- as will Chinese labor expenses -- making Chinese Manufacturing less of
a
good deal. Who knows... it may turn out shipping plastic freight cars from
Mexico (in real freight cars) becomes a viable alternative.

Dave Nelson




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: B&O USRA Box Car Color - 1930's? D&H Caboose Red?

rwitt_2000
 

Jason Sanford wrote:

I am in the process of painting a USRA box car for the B&O circa
1930's. The Westerfield directions mention D&H caboose red is a near
perfect match. Only problem is floquil no longer makes this color.
Anyone have any ideas for a sub? Thanks.
Jason,

I just re-read my Westerfield instructions and they discuss cars painted
"bright red oxide" as the color match for the D&H caboose red. This is
for post-WWII paint and lettering. For the 1930s the B&O used a brown
freight car color with the best example being in a Jack Delano photo of
the Galewood Yard showing the end view of a B&O M-15 wood sheathed car
reasonably clean.

Here is the link to the Shorpy site:
http://www.shorpy.com/node/704?size=_original

The B&O box car is partially in the shadows. It is the rightmost car in
the third row from the bottom of the photo. It is the best example we
have for this color.

I hope this helps.

Bob Witt

96801 - 96820 of 187868