Date   

Re: Raised panel roof replacement

Bill Welch
 

Dear Ken

I did the pattern Ted used in his modernized LNE car using the RC X29/1923 kit and I am mystified as to which LNE kit you are referring to from Speedwitch as I think he only offers the rebuilt version with the Murphy roof.

My pattern involved narrowing a styrene Murphy roof (Branchline, with permission) and using the roof furnished with the RC kit as a base to glue it to. I am leaving out details but as to what I did to the kit roof to prepare it as a base because I am too lazy to type them.

The same roof, plus a diagonal paneled which I also did can be come in two versions of a Maine Central re-roofing. I need to redo the pattern for the CNJ rebuild.

Does this help?

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "Ken" <kobrien1600@...> wrote:

I'd like to change the roof of some of my Lehigh & New England Red Caboose X-29 type cars. The last series of L&NE boxes were delivered with raised panel roofs. The original style flat roof leaked and since the LNE hauled bagged cement, better water-tight roofs were needed. I have a Speedwitch conversion kit for an older series LNE car and this started me thinking of this conversion.
The few car pictures I've seen aren't real definitive. I suppose they used a Murphy raised panel roof; these were used by other roads in that area. These roofs had the raised rectangular panels between the roof ribs.

Does anyone make a drop-in replacement roof? I'd like at least two. Thanks.

Ken O'Brien


Ashland Oil Co Tank Cars

al.kresse <water.kresse@...>
 

Does anyone know of pictures and descriptions of the Ashland Oil Company tank cars used circa WW II? What was their reporting mark?

Does anyone know the split between the N&W and C&O in moving these cars? . . . incoming and processed outgoing?

Al Kresse


Re: MOW Tank car

Ken O'Brien
 

Richard, thanks for the picture and this information. I'll put this project on a back burner for now.

Ken

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Jul 27, 2010, at 1:46 PM, Ken wrote:

The Lackawanna had a small number(20 per the 1947 diagram book)of
tank cars for various MOW uses. Only one car had its own diagram in
the '47 and '60 car diagram books I have and a line in the '53
ORER. It was formerly UTLX 70800, a 10K gallon car and built in
1920. The diagrams and ORER say it was 32'7" over the buffers. I'd
like to model it, but which model is appropriate? Thanks.

Ken O'Brien
Ken, a variety of cars were in the UTLX 70XXX number series, but most
of them were built by General American, and the UTL outage tables for
cars adjacent to 70800 suggest that it was a GATC circumferential
course tank car. I have a photo of such a car as built for UTL, UTLX
70312, which I'll attach to an off-list e-mail. The bad news is that
no models of these cars are to be had except for some brass models
which occasionally turn up (for substantial prices) on the second
hand market. The good news is that I believe work is going forward
on a resin kit for them which may be announced either late this year
or early next year.

Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: MOW Tank car

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 27, 2010, at 1:46 PM, Ken wrote:

The Lackawanna had a small number(20 per the 1947 diagram book)of
tank cars for various MOW uses. Only one car had its own diagram in
the '47 and '60 car diagram books I have and a line in the '53
ORER. It was formerly UTLX 70800, a 10K gallon car and built in
1920. The diagrams and ORER say it was 32'7" over the buffers. I'd
like to model it, but which model is appropriate? Thanks.

Ken O'Brien
Ken, a variety of cars were in the UTLX 70XXX number series, but most
of them were built by General American, and the UTL outage tables for
cars adjacent to 70800 suggest that it was a GATC circumferential
course tank car. I have a photo of such a car as built for UTL, UTLX
70312, which I'll attach to an off-list e-mail. The bad news is that
no models of these cars are to be had except for some brass models
which occasionally turn up (for substantial prices) on the second
hand market. The good news is that I believe work is going forward
on a resin kit for them which may be announced either late this year
or early next year.

Richard Hendrickson


Raised panel roof replacement

Ken O'Brien
 

I'd like to change the roof of some of my Lehigh & New England Red Caboose X-29 type cars. The last series of L&NE boxes were delivered with raised panel roofs. The original style flat roof leaked and since the LNE hauled bagged cement, better water-tight roofs were needed. I have a Speedwitch conversion kit for an older series LNE car and this started me thinking of this conversion.
The few car pictures I've seen aren't real definitive. I suppose they used a Murphy raised panel roof; these were used by other roads in that area. These roofs had the raised rectangular panels between the roof ribs.

Does anyone make a drop-in replacement roof? I'd like at least two. Thanks.

Ken O'Brien


MOW Tank car

Ken O'Brien
 

The Lackawanna had a small number(20 per the 1947 diagram book)of tank cars for various MOW uses. Only one car had its own diagram in the '47 and '60 car diagram books I have and a line in the '53 ORER. It was formerly UTLX 70800, a 10K gallon car and built in 1920. The diagrams and ORER say it was 32'7" over the buffers. I'd like to model it, but which model is appropriate? Thanks.

Ken O'Brien


Kingan in San Francisco

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Dave,

Kingan did indeed have a San Francisco operation, but on the SP, not the WP (though it is in the WP shippers guide). It was located at 4th & Townsend, and had a capacity of three cars. The commodity received was "PHP" or packing house products.

Kind regards,


Garth Groff

On Mon, 26 Jul 2010 11:05:08 -0700
"Dave Nelson" <Lake_Muskoka@...> wrote:
My recollection is there was a Kingan branch house in San Francisco but I'd
have to find my WP shippers list to verify that for you and at the moment I
don't know where I've stored that.

When I typed Mather I was thinking Morrell (seems the fingers weren't paying
attention).

Dave Nelson


Re: Meat Reefer usage

Douglas Harding
 

Tony, yes I think that would be consistent with the 50's.

There were two kinds of meat packing plants, those that did just slaughtering and those that slaughtered and processed meat, what
we call value added product today. The Decker Meat Plant in Mason City was a full processing facility. It slaughtered animals and
also produced a wide variety of meat products, hams, bacon, sausages as well as variety of luncheon meats and related meat
products, ie lard. These processed meat products were also called "PHP" for packing house products.

Most slaughter houses shipped the carcasses to branch houses, ie hanging meat, where the carcass was cut down into the various
chucks of meat, then shipped to grocery stores or meat markets where it was cut into steaks, chops, roasts, loins, etc. The branch
house would also function as a whole sale warehouse, where butchers, restaurants, grocery chains would purchase carcasses for
their own business use.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Meat Reefer usage

David Sieber
 

--- In STMFC@..., Dave Nelson wrote:
"My recollection is there was a Kingan branch house in San Francisco but I'd have to find my WP shippers list to verify that for you and at the moment I don't know where I've stored that."
Then Douglas Harding wrote "Do you have evidence of Kingan having a branch house in California? I am always looking to add to my list."

Gentlemen,

May I remind you of an excellent resource, the Industry Database of the Operations SIG. They've already done extensive research and welcome additional info to add to their files. Their website states:

"Operations SIG is compiling a list of industries throughout North America for use in creating waybills for traffic moving to, from or via model railroads ... Currently there are about 40,000 industries in our directory (still being accumulated) ... "industries" are not just factories but also grain elevators, mines, etc - [railroad] customers - but omit freight stations, team tracks, icing facilities, etc."

Their homepage is at http://www.opsig.org/industrydb/ It has the key to their databases, which are organized by region with links to each. Each record starts with era, then the industry name, by city of state (primary sort keys), servicing railroad, and commodities received and/or shipped by rail. Presently, all regions are covered by txt files on the appropriately named "infoharvest" although they are also converting them to Excel, region by region.

Since the OPSIG is still building their very large database, the information is valid for the industries shown; i.e., in 1954, Cudahy had a packing house in Fresno CA that shipped meat products via the ATSF and SP, which was taken over in 1955 by Hormel. However, it should NOT be considered definitive looking the other direction (i.e., you CANNOT say that "Cudahy isn't shown in San Francisco, so Cudahy never had a facility there"), since an industry that actually did exist in a particular city may not be shown simply because they don't have good information on it yet.

With that caveat, the OPSIG industry database shows packing houses in San Francisco including Hormel and Swift, plus Vienna Sausage and several local butcher/packers (Levy, Moffit, Shenson, and Union Sheep Co.(!)) plus others in the SF Bay Area such as Morrel and another Swift facility in Oakland. Regretably, I did not find a record for any Kingan facility in SF, nor elsewhere in California, nor anywhere on the west coast. If you do find Kingan on your WP shippers list, please let us know here. Moreover, it would be great if you could also tell the OPSIG, who advise that "data can be sent by email, or single-file attachments to email, to IndustryDB@... (Please include "OpSIG" in the subject line)." I imagine they'd really appreciate a scan of the entire WP shippers list, which would be a lot of data entry, but might really expand their database with solid data.

Just a thought, Dave Sieber, Reno NV


Re: model car weight

Jared Harper
 

I use pecans because of their elongated shape. It gives a better weight distribution.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In STMFC@..., "grsjr@..." <GRSJr@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@..., bnonut@ wrote:

One party, NMRA member, told us the original weight requirements were put in place for the early trucks. Guy models the B&O in the fifties. He had quite a few articles in Railroad Model Journal.
I usually use two large nuts per boxcar. Leave one truck loose and keep the other tighter.
Prefer the semiscale wheels and sergent couplers.

Mark Morgan
Mark,

Do you use walnuts or pecans?

Ray


Otto Frei Baby Pin Vise

Riley K <riley050748@...>
 

This tiny pin vise looks interesting for drilling holes for underbody car piping. Has anyone had experience with it?

Thanks,

Riley Kinney


Re: Meat Reefer usage

Dave Nelson
 

My recollection is there was a Kingan branch house in San Francisco but I'd
have to find my WP shippers list to verify that for you and at the moment I
don't know where I've stored that.

When I typed Mather I was thinking Morrell (seems the fingers weren't paying
attention).

Dave Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Douglas Harding


Do you have evidence of Kingan having a branch house in California? I am
always looking to add to my list.


Re: Meat Reefer usage

Clark Propst
 

While it's generally assumed meat moved eastward, here's a car from a Milw damage claim report that went all the way west.

From - Armour & Co. mason City Ia
To - Seattle Ice Co.
Route - MStL Mpls CMStP&P
Date - 4/15/1955
Car - ARLX 196
Lading - canned pork

Clark Propst


Re: Painting whisker couplers

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I've found P-B-L's "Neolube" to be very useful for lubricating coupler shanks and butt ends.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

If you are using rubber or vinyl gloves while painting (and if not, why
not?) it's really easy to hold each one and airbrush it. The corrugated
cardboard idea is good if you don't stick them in too far, because you do
want to paint a short piece of the shanks behind the head.



Rather than use the dry graphite that Kadee sells, I use a soft Eagle
"Draughting" pencil, an artist's sketching pencil, and simply rub the box,
the clip on cover if I'm actually using the Athearn thing, and the coupler
shank with it, which applies a coating of graphite which isn't going
anywhere. However, since I operate a yard on a regular basis I have to
disagree with Ron Merrick's comment:



Most people probably realize it's not the knuckle spring that is critical.



It's just as critical as the centering spring, and at times more so, if you
actually use the delayed uncoupling trick.



SGL





=======
Email scanned by PC Tools - No viruses or spyware found.
(Email Guard: 7.0.0.18, Virus/Spyware Database: 6.15500)
http://www.pctools.com/
=======




Re: Meat Reefer usage

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Friends,

The Swift people had a distribution plant in Oakland served by the WP. The only photo I have ever seen of a Swift car on the WP is a photo in my collection showing a wooden 37' car in yellow paint on an eastbound steam-powered freight (probably an empty) around 1947.

Kind regards,


Garth Groff


Re: Rapido Trains' freight model announcement at National Train Show?

Clark Propst
 

The Mini-box model was in a clear display box. Having built a couple F&C cars anything would be an improvement - construction wise anyway.

Al was busy talking to another fella while I was there, but his wife was helpful. She was wearing a nifty T-shirt with "The Farewell Tour" on the back and their final show dates. They are not coming to Naperville and rap up next April. Guess we need to keep an eye on their website for release of the Q model.
Clark Propst

How did the TLT CP minibox look to you? And did Al W. have any idea >when that CB&Q boxcar was going to be available?

Bob.


Re: Rapido Trains' freight model announcement at National Train Show?

Clark Propst
 

Bob, I looked at my photos of Armour reefers and also took a quick thumb through Gene's reefer book. Only a few wooden cars leased to Dubuque pack had corner steps anything like the ones in the link photo. So, I don't know what the heck they have in mind? I will be buying some of those trucks to put under my M&StL auto box and rebuilds there of.

We go up by Red Lake in NW Ontario in Sept. This trip was to just south of International Falls. On a sad note, the S2 Alcos there have been replaced with some ugly UP rebuilt EMD switchers.

Clark Propst

Clark,
There is always room for more freight cars. How did the TLT CP minibox look to you? And did Al W. have any idea when that CB&Q boxcar was going to be available?

I post to the Proto layout group as well, so welcome back from your recent fishing trip. Catch any big ones? I am originally from ND, so I have grown up walleye fishing on Lake Sakakawea. By the time I get back up there in a couple of years, the population should have rebounded. Just in time...

Bob.


Re: National Perishable Freight Committee

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Mark Morgan wrote:
Thank You, Steve. My brother loves the AT&SF. I appreciate it and model the B&O. I plan to send it to him.
The general information on perishables will apply to your B&O modeling, too, Mark.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Painting whisker couplers

Schuyler Larrabee
 

If you are using rubber or vinyl gloves while painting (and if not, why
not?) it's really easy to hold each one and airbrush it. The corrugated
cardboard idea is good if you don't stick them in too far, because you do
want to paint a short piece of the shanks behind the head.



Rather than use the dry graphite that Kadee sells, I use a soft Eagle
"Draughting" pencil, an artist's sketching pencil, and simply rub the box,
the clip on cover if I'm actually using the Athearn thing, and the coupler
shank with it, which applies a coating of graphite which isn't going
anywhere. However, since I operate a yard on a regular basis I have to
disagree with Ron Merrick's comment:



Most people probably realize it's not the knuckle spring that is critical.



It's just as critical as the centering spring, and at times more so, if you
actually use the delayed uncoupling trick.



SGL





=======
Email scanned by PC Tools - No viruses or spyware found.
(Email Guard: 7.0.0.18, Virus/Spyware Database: 6.15500)
http://www.pctools.com/
=======


Re: National Perishable Freight Committee

Steve SANDIFER
 

You are most welcome.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, July 25, 2010 9:34 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: National Perishable Freight Committee



Steve Sandifer wrote:
> I have posted in the Member's Only section of the Santa Fe Society
> website a pdf copy of SFRD Circular No. 2-J, Rules and Regulations
> Governing the Handling of Perishable Freight, December 15,
> 1941 . . . Since some of you are not ATSF society members, I am also
> posting it temporarily at www.ssandifer.com/SFRD2-J.pdf. If you want
> it, download it . . .

Thank you, Steve. A valuable document for that era, which I can
peruse and use.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

101601 - 101620 of 193503