Date   

Re: [Ops-Ind] Grain box cars

Jack Mullen
 

Jeff Aley asked


Can a plain-bearing equipped box car be moved using the same method as shown in the video? I believe that plain bearings are much harder to get started (vs roller bearings).
Yes.

What makes you think those aren't plain bearings in the video?

jack Mullen


ADMIN:Re: Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos

mike brock <brockm@...>
 

I wrote about Rob Simpson's photos:

True enough. They were interesting. For that matter, so is the Suez Canal
and it...and the photos Rob addressed are not North American frt cars and,
therefore, are nitely out of scope.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner
Well...actually, they are out of scope during the day time as well. Can't trust a computer...which I've known for 40 yrs. Take DEFINITELY and subtract "DEFI" and one has to wonder about day time messages. No matter...the STMFC is about steam era frt cars and will remain so.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos

mike brock <brockm@...>
 

Rob Simpson writes:


And now for some really early color railroad photos. Not North American, but interesting the same.
True enough. They were interesting. For that matter, so is the Suez Canal and it...and the photos Rob addressed are not North American frt cars and, therefore, are nitely out of scope.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Cardboard Grain Doors

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

Someone sent a link to a 15 minute 'living history' video
of "a day in the life of the guy who runs the grain elevator".
It was shot out on the prairies in Canada in the early 80's.

So any way - they showed him nailing up a cardboard grain
door in what looked like a standard run-of-the-mill CP box
car. He was nailing from the inside.

So how did he get out of the car? (Didn't show that part.)

- Jim


Re: trying to identify the double-sheathed boxcar on the extreme left

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Aug 5, 2010, at 12:57 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:


My guess is a MILW company car -- the 26 MB tiff makes it look
like the first digit of the car number is "X" -- which is how the
MILW numbered company service cars.
I think Tim is correct, and I will add that this is one of the cars
modeled by the recently released Westerfield resin kits. Many of
these MILW double sheathed box survived in revenue service into the
late 1940s/early 1950s, and a sizable number of survivors went to MW
service after retirement.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos

Benjamin Hom
 

John Stokes wrote:
"It would help if you would educate the great unwashed out here, what did I miss in my comments? Here is the info from the link you so kindly posted for me. I believe I was correct in my assumption that these photos were original color photos and not hand painted black & white photos. Was it the use of the term "film" that got your dander up? Sorry, should have said "slides" or "transparencies." Same point, however."

Sir, words have meaning. You posted:
"They were apparently actual color photos from early color film, not the hand painted photos that we also see from time to time where the color might be a figment of the colorist's imagination."

In an academic discussion, the word "apparently" is a weasel word that translates as "I'm uncertain about my facts." As I stated before, this collection has been discussed at length on this list, and the giveaway that this collection was photographed on transparencies was the discussion regarding Kodachrome over the past few days. Additionally, the background on this collection is well documented on the Library of Congress website. Don't get angry with me over constructive criticism.

John also wrote:
"Wow, well excuse me, Sir! I guess I forgot that this group is restricted to only the self important and self acknowledged 'experts.'"

Sir, I will happily match my body of work against yours any day of the week.


Ben Hom


Bill Folsom Photo CDs

Michael <alcofm@...>
 

Would anyone know if the Bill Folsom Photo CDs are still available anywhere? I was especially interested in locating the Georgia RR / A&WP / WofA freight cars CD, along with the CofG and A&WP passenger train CDs that were produced.

Mike Meier


Re: How thick is 0.040 styrene?

Steve Haas
 

"But the sample of Evergreen #9040 0.040" styrene I have measures 0.042"
thick. Is it just my sample? Is yours the same? If it's consistent, then
I can just re-draw at 0.042"; if it's a wide range, then I'll have to adjust
accordingly."

Jeff,

Just checked a several year old piece of .Evergreen .040 that I've got here.
My instrumentation isn't as accurate as it should be for a discussion like
this, but by eyeball on the calipers it would appear to be close to the
aforementioned .042. Wouldn't use my measurements as a standalone, but they
may serve to support the measurements of others.

Best,

Steve Haas
Snoqualmie, WA


Re: How thick is 0.040 styrene?

Aley, Jeff A
 

Never mind; it turns out that it was my (relatively inexpensive dial) calipers, and/or the moron using them.

A mechanical engineer here at work re-measured the sheets using a high-quality set of digital calipers, and they are 0.0405".

Regards,

-Jeff


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Aley, Jeff A
Sent: Thursday, August 05, 2010 10:07 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] How thick is 0.040 styrene?



..and what color is George Washington's white horse?

No seriously, I'm designing a laser-kit that has tab-and-slot construction. I drew the slots to fit 0.040" material.

But the sample of Evergreen #9040 0.040" styrene I have measures 0.042" thick. Is it just my sample? Is yours the same? If it's consistent, then I can just re-draw at 0.042"; if it's a wide range, then I'll have to adjust accordingly.

Thanks for your help.

Regards,

-Jeff


Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
Colors have definitely changed over the years. I remember this was
explained quite clearly in a Calvin & Hobbes Sunday edition...
http://www.cooperativeindividualism.org/calvin-father-on-black-and-white-pictures.gif
Extremely good hit, Tim. I'd forgotten that one. Reminds me that I do miss Calvin & Hobbes (and Larson !).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

John Stokes wrote:
Wow, well excuse me, Sir! I guess I forgot that this group is restricted to only the self important and self acknowledged "experts." Won't post again anytime soon, other more important and friendlier groups to participate in.
Better cut down on the caffeine, John. Ben is as constructive and helpful a member of this list as there is. And if you don't realize he IS an expert, you need to get out more.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Al Brown wrote:
A few days ago we discussed colors in a Jack Delano freight-yard photo, as they might be applied to STMFC modelling. This group of photos also has some Delano pictures of non-railroad subjects; what do y'all think of the colors in those? (I wish I could ask my late dad, who remembered that time.)
Reminds me of the theory that before 1935 or so, the world actually was NOT in color, but in B&W. That's what all the evidence shows, anyway.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Explosive Card Board - Drawing

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Charlie Vlk wrote:
Obviously it isn't "explosive cardboard" but a Board for Explosive Cards..... just your normal wood tackboards that also got "Do Not Hump" and other notices nailed to it...
That's why drawings call them out as "placard boards."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: [Ops-Ind] Grain box cars

wlhoss@...
 

Jeff,

I use to work at a place where I had occasion to use a car mover like shown
in the film. As long as the track was fairly level, moving the car was
not to hard - if it started rolling however, stopping it was much harder as
anyone who's tried to stop one with 2x4's can attest . . . . and I would
hate to have to move the same car in the winter though when everything is
stiffer, including my fingers.

In a message dated 8/5/2010 11:20:15 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
Jeff.A.Aley@... writes:

Doug,

Great video!

Can a plain-bearing equipped box car be moved using the same method as
shown in the video? I believe that plain bearings are much harder to get
started (vs roller bearings).

Regards,

-Jeff


Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos

al_brown03
 

I asked the question because the other day, someone felt Delano's freight-yard pictures generally look dark, i.e. darker than the actual objects would be. This suggests that to use these pictures as references for modelling, we'd need to lighten the colors. Freight-car colors vary in the first place and change with weathering, and most industrial areas are less grimy now than years ago; so I thought I'd check the perception mentioned above, against Delano's colors of non-railroad objects, via the memories of those who were there. (I wasn't.) Mr Stokes's recollection is exactly the type of memory I was hoping for, and I thank him. I'm not an expert on photography or the OWI collection so can't address those matters.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

P.S. Larry Jackman would agree with Calvin's father, and told the list so. :-)

--- In STMFC@..., John Stokes <ggstokes@...> wrote:


Wow, well excuse me, Sir! I guess I forgot that this group is restricted to only the self important and self acknowledged "experts." Won't post again anytime soon, other more important and friendlier groups to participate in.

It would help if you would educate the great unwashed out here, what did I miss in my comments? Here is the info from the link you so kindly posted for me. I believe I was correct in my assumption that these photos were original color photos and not hand painted black & white photos. Was it the use of the term "film" that got your dander up? Sorry, should have said "slides" or "transparencies." Same point, however.

"The 644 color photographs produced by the FSA are less well known and far less extensive than the unit's black-and-white photographs. Most of the color images are 35mm Kodachrome slides; a few are color transparencies in sizes up to 4x5-inches. The FSA color photographs depict life in the United States, including Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, with a focus on rural areas and farm labor.

"The 965 color photographs from the OWI are color transparencies in sizes up to 4x5-inches. The photographs depicted life and culture in the U.S., with a focus on factories and women employees, railroads, aviation training, and other aspects of World War II mobilization."

John Stokes
Bellevue, WA


To: STMFC@...
From: b.hom@...
Date: Thu, 5 Aug 2010 19:22:11 +0000
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos








John Stokes wrote:
"They were apparently actual color photos from early color film, not the hand painted photos that we also see from time to time where the color might be a figment of the colorist's imagination."

Wow. You really don't know much about the FSA/OWI Collection. Here's a link to some background regarding the collection; addtional links on the page give further context to this remarkable collection of photos.
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/fsac/background.html

Ben Hom







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: trying to identify the double-sheathed boxcar on the extreme left

Tim O'Connor
 

My guess is a MILW company car -- the 26 MB tiff makes it look
like the first digit of the car number is "X" -- which is how the
MILW numbered company service cars.

At 8/5/2010 01:26 PM Thursday, you wrote:
Hi List Members,

Pls have a look at the image (Digital ID: fsa 8a04520) below:

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/I?fsaall:46:./temp/~ammem_7DuA::displayType=1:m856sd=fsa:m856sf=8a04520:@@@

I'm trying to identify the double-sheathed boxcar on the extreme left of the photo, with the strap steel reinforcements going around the corners from the sides onto the ends.

I downloaded the 13 megabyte TIFF version (there is a link for this purpose on the above page), but could not identify the owning road.

I'm suspecting a GN car, but this is only a guess on my part.

Any thoughts?

Thanks in advance - Claus Schlund at Hell Gate Models


Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos

Stokes John
 

Wow, well excuse me, Sir! I guess I forgot that this group is restricted to only the self important and self acknowledged "experts." Won't post again anytime soon, other more important and friendlier groups to participate in.

It would help if you would educate the great unwashed out here, what did I miss in my comments? Here is the info from the link you so kindly posted for me. I believe I was correct in my assumption that these photos were original color photos and not hand painted black & white photos. Was it the use of the term "film" that got your dander up? Sorry, should have said "slides" or "transparencies." Same point, however.

"The 644 color photographs produced by the FSA are less well known and far less extensive than the unit's black-and-white photographs. Most of the color images are 35mm Kodachrome slides; a few are color transparencies in sizes up to 4x5-inches. The FSA color photographs depict life in the United States, including Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, with a focus on rural areas and farm labor.

"The 965 color photographs from the OWI are color transparencies in sizes up to 4x5-inches. The photographs depicted life and culture in the U.S., with a focus on factories and women employees, railroads, aviation training, and other aspects of World War II mobilization."

John Stokes
Bellevue, WA


To: STMFC@...
From: b.hom@...
Date: Thu, 5 Aug 2010 19:22:11 +0000
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos








John Stokes wrote:
"They were apparently actual color photos from early color film, not the hand painted photos that we also see from time to time where the color might be a figment of the colorist's imagination."

Wow. You really don't know much about the FSA/OWI Collection. Here's a link to some background regarding the collection; addtional links on the page give further context to this remarkable collection of photos.
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/fsac/background.html

Ben Hom


Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos

Benjamin Hom
 

John Stokes wrote:
"They were apparently actual color photos from early color film, not the hand painted photos that we also see from time to time where the color might be a figment of the colorist's imagination."

Wow. You really don't know much about the FSA/OWI Collection. Here's a link to some background regarding the collection; addtional links on the page give further context to this remarkable collection of photos.
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/fsac/background.html


Ben Hom


Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos

Stokes John
 

Thanks for the chuckle, I haven't seen that one for eons.

My own personal opinion and recollection is that the colors of the buildings in these photos is accurate for the time period. They were apparently actual color photos from early color film, not the hand painted photos that we also see from time to time where the color might be a figment of the colorist's imagination. As has been documented in several books on the period, after the early part of the century, especially into the 30's and 40's, many houses and buildings were painted simple white, and of course, oxide or barn red was also common.

John Stokes
Bellevue, WA



To: STMFC@...
From: timboconnor@...
Date: Thu, 5 Aug 2010 14:45:15 -0400
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos







Colors have definitely changed over the years. I remember this was
explained quite clearly in a Calvin & Hobbes Sunday edition...
http://www.cooperativeindividualism.org/calvin-father-on-black-and-white-pictures.gif

Tim O'Connor


Re: Interesting set of STM-era photos

Tim O'Connor
 

Colors have definitely changed over the years. I remember this was
explained quite clearly in a Calvin & Hobbes Sunday edition...
http://www.cooperativeindividualism.org/calvin-father-on-black-and-white-pictures.gif

Tim O'Connor

At 8/5/2010 11:47 AM Thursday, you wrote:
A few days ago we discussed colors in a Jack Delano freight-yard photo, as they might be applied to STMFC modelling. This group of photos also has some Delano pictures of non-railroad subjects; what do y'all think of the colors in those? (I wish I could ask my late dad, who remembered that time.)

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

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