Date   

Re: 3D printing

Bob Kutella
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Jack Burgess" <jack@...> wrote:

Tim wrote:

<This subject has come up before, rapid prototyping etc. Has
<anyone tried to produce resin masters using this process?
A friend of mine used this process for producing a fairly elaborate truck sideframe for a single truck trolley in 1:24. He made VERY detailed cadd files himself using AUTOCAD and then I believe he converted them to the required stereo lithography file extension. Is that .sla? So those are two software packages that he owns and learned to use. It is absolute mandatory to do the drawings in 3D and the vendors really have no knowledge of what we are trying to accomplish. So - a lot of research may be needed.

By doing the design himself he was able to make it 'affordable' depending on your definition of that. The finished sideframes were quite delicate, and in my opinion certainly on the fragile side in a fairly soft resin finished product. He made a pair and did not intend to use them as masters for producing more.

I think this is probably more practical in the larger scales, rather than HO, for example. I would tend to make the drawing in cadd using actual feet and inches, and if reduced to HO in a physical way, many cross sections would be paper thin and could hardly be handled. Manufacturers address this all the time making "overscale" stirrups, etc but we should be aware of the same limits if we try this process.

More than once I have considered venturing down this road, but so far have only limited capability in AUTOCAD for 3D work, and no software to make the file conversion. HMMM - the weather is turning colder and maybe it is time to do a project. I 'think' Garden Railways had a column with some short discussion of the process, and websites and vendors in a recent issue.

Bob Kutella


Re: C&O auto frame flats

Charles Hladik
 

Tim,
I thought that all the flat car auto frames were stacked "flat", while
the gons were more or less "upright". Been wrong before.
Chuck Hladik

In a message dated 9/14/2010 12:07:20 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
timboconnor@... writes:




Thought I would check out the C&O ex-PM AAR 70 ton flat cars just
announced by Intermountain, and noticed this: some of these cars were
in auto frame service, notably 216516 and 216518. And here one of the
models is numbered 216513 -- so just change one digit and you're good
to go! Of course it would be great to know whether the C&O stacked
them flat, or upright... :-)

_http://imrcmodels.com/flyer330.htm_ (http://imrcmodels.com/flyer330.htm)

Tim O'Connor





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: GN ore jennies

Steve Haas
 

"One more question to the GN experts about the ore jennies: I'm told they
were
permanently coupled with a drawbar in groups (of five???), with rotary
couplers at the end of each group. Does this sound right?"

Perhaps later in life, but not as originally built.

The as built cars were all bottom dump, as they were run out onto the ore
docks, doors were opened and the ore was allowed to drop into the bins on
the ore dock. The cars were not permanently coupled during this time,
either, as the railroads worked with the steel companies to make sure the
ore in each boat met the mills requirements for the steel to be made from
that boatload. Individual cars were mixed and matched (and sometimes
interchanged between the various railroads serving the head of the lakes, to
make sure each boatload of ore had the necessary composition.

Later, when Taconite was processed into Taconite pellets in the vicinity of
the mines, and the Taconite pellets were stored near the docks (at Allouez
yard), cars _may_ have been reconfigured as the permanently coupled 5 unit
groups with the rotary couplers.

Quoting Dorin in Lines East, "The Taconite pellet facility was dedicated on
June 15, 1967 before 150 guests". The processing of taconite on the range
didn't take off until after changes were made to Minnesota tax laws in the
early 60's.

During the era the STMFC covers, the ore cars would have been single
non-connected cars, without rotary couplers.

Other resources that might be useful include "Lake Superior Iron Ore
Railroads". At least I think that's the title, mine is still in storage
from our move earlier this year and I can't find it tonight.

Best,

Steve Haas
Snoqualmie, WA









------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: GN ore jennies

ottokroutil
 

One more question to the GN experts about the ore jennies: I'm told they were permanently coupled with a drawbar in groups (of five???), with rotary couplers at the end of each group. Does this sound right?

Thanks for any advice.
Regards, Otto

--- In STMFC@..., otask@... wrote:


33" wheels it is then. Thanks to all who responded.
Regards, Otto







Re: C&O auto frame flats

Bernd Schroeder
 

ok, the usual question: which of the schemes are accurate ?

I assume EL (which is too late for this list, so I copy this message to bbfcl), since the original car was built for the Erie


thanks

Bernd

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2010 6:07 AM
Subject: [STMFC] C&O auto frame flats


Thought I would check out the C&O ex-PM AAR 70 ton flat cars just
announced by Intermountain, and noticed this: some of these cars were
in auto frame service, notably 216516 and 216518. And here one of the
models is numbered 216513 -- so just change one digit and you're good
to go! Of course it would be great to know whether the C&O stacked
them flat, or upright... :-)

http://imrcmodels.com/flyer330.htm

Tim O'Connor



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



C&O auto frame flats

Tim O'Connor
 

Thought I would check out the C&O ex-PM AAR 70 ton flat cars just
announced by Intermountain, and noticed this: some of these cars were
in auto frame service, notably 216516 and 216518. And here one of the
models is numbered 216513 -- so just change one digit and you're good
to go! Of course it would be great to know whether the C&O stacked
them flat, or upright... :-)

http://imrcmodels.com/flyer330.htm

Tim O'Connor


Re: 3D printing

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Tim wrote:

<This subject has come up before, rapid prototyping etc. Has
<anyone tried to produce resin masters using this process?

We will have a clinic on this process (3D CAD to rapid prototyping to
masters for lost wax castings) at the 2011 NMRA Convention next year in
Sacramento (www.x2011west.org) by a firm who has been doing it for model
railroad applications for a while...(couldn't miss the opportunity to
publicize our convention).


Jack Burgess
Publicity Chairman
X2011 West
NMRA Convention
Sacramento - July 3-9, 2011


Re: ACCURAIL separate ladders & grabs

Tim O'Connor
 

Larry, not quite true -- Overland imported both the original & rebuilt
versions of the GN Canton hoppers. For some reason these were not popular
and a number [at least 4 :-)] were sold on Ebay about 10 years ago for about
$50 each...

Tim O'Connor

Even if Accurail has the molded on grabirons & ladders, they still put some very accurate models such as the GN hoppers. I have built up about 4 of them with some super detailing, changing grabirons to wire, adding some brake lines & adding cut levers. Outside of scratchbuilding, this is only way one can obtain these GN hoppers. They also look very nice after these modifications/additions.
Keep up the good work!!!
Larry Wolohon


Re: 3D printing

Jim Hayes
 

Smoky Mountain is doing it.
www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com


On Mon, Sep 13, 2010 at 8:23 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>wrote:



This subject has come up before, rapid prototyping etc. Has
anyone tried to produce resin masters using this process?

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/14/technology/14print.html

Tim O'Connor



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


3D printing

Tim O'Connor
 

This subject has come up before, rapid prototyping etc. Has
anyone tried to produce resin masters using this process?

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/14/technology/14print.html

Tim O'Connor


Re: ACCURAIL separate ladders & grabs

Larry Wolohon
 

Even if Accurail has the molded on grabirons & ladders, they still put some very accurate models such as the GN hoppers. I have built up about 4 of them with some super detailing, changing grabirons to wire, adding some brake lines & adding cut levers. Outside of scratchbuilding, this is only way one can obtain these GN hoppers. They also look very nice after these modifications/additions.

Keep up the good work!!!

Larry Wolohon

----- Original Message -----
From: "soolinehistory" <destorzek@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, September 13, 2010 3:13:27 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: ACCURAIL separate ladders & grabs








--- In STMFC@... , "lifeisgood_u2" <goodheart05@...> wrote:

I enjoy resin and the better plastic kits but have started an ambitious new layout, so don't log much craftsman kit time these days. But need a fleet of period (30's)cars in the interm. Was talking to a dealer and we mentioned Accurail and lamented that they didn't have a line of cars with separate ladders, grabs, etc. as a balance between the shake-the-box and time-consuming craftsman kits. He said "yeah, everyone says that," so I assume Accurail hears it a lot too. Some of our members clearly have ties to Accurail. Can anyone comment on Accurail's position on the topic?

Wayne O'Hern
New York & Northern (aka Rutland)
I've been reading all the nice things people have had to say about Accurail kits, and suppose I should comment.

The main reason why Accurail won't consider doing kits with multiple separate ladders and grab irons is simply that then they wouldn't be Accurail kits. One cannot be all things to all people, as the recent discussion of the new NYC car has pointed out, and the Accurail name has come to be associated with kits that take a certain level of skill, and yield a model having a certain level of fidelity to prototype.

My partner and I have been in this hobby a very long time. Both of us date back to the time when plastic models could only be had from (in decreasing order of fidelity) Athearn, Train Miniature, MDC/Roundhouse, and AHM. Craftsman kits came from outfits like Ambroid and Northeastern; those sported separate grabs, but lacked such basic detail as rivets and bolt heads. Resin kits were just on the horizon, with people such as Bill Clouser doing fabulous (but pricey) work in 1/4" scale.

In those days, an awful lot of editorial space was devoted to trying to convince manufacturers to make the styrene equivalent of a craftsman kit. I've seen many try, starting, I suppose, with Kurtz Kraft, which was out of production but still available when I attained a skill level where I could build them. Of the many companies that followed that advice, none are making kits today; they are either out of business, or send their work to China to have it pre-assembled, and bring it back at a price that is easily ten times what a model freight car was when I started in the hobby. We do not believe this is where the future of the hobby lies.

What was learned during these intervening years is that the market for highly detailed KITS is not proportional to the cost of producing them. Here resin has a clear advantage, as while resin kits are relatively expensive, most of that is due to the cost of production; very little is at risk as the initial investment in tooling.

As to comments that "many" people have asked for this alternate product line, define many. I am reminded of a conversation I had with a modeler at a convention some years ago, who was trying to convince us that Accurail should enter N scale. I was trying to pin down what would be desirable about our product to the N scale market, and his reply was, "with brand X quality at Accurail prices, you'd make a killing." When I pointed out that due to the difference in the size of the potential market, we would likely have to charge the same prices as Brand X, he basically said, "Don't bother." Sometimes you can't take peoples' statements at face value; you need to dig a bit deeper to get to the truth.

Dennis Storzek
Accurail, Inc.




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Endangered Tools

Larry Wolohon
 

Denny & others,

This is bad news, I have used my PBL sprue cutters continuously since I bought mine in 1997. I also used a miniature T square a lot that Simpson used to make quite a bit, from the early 1980's. I dropped last spring, it broke & I was unable to fix it. This tool is also no longer available, since Russ Simpson passed away. I still haven't been able to find a suitable replacement.

Now I will be more careful with my tools.

Larry Wolohon

----- Original Message -----
From: "Denny Anspach" <danspach@...>
To: "STMFC List" <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, September 13, 2010 2:44:52 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Endangered Tools






Like the advancing thin edge of the wedge, it has come to my attention that several of our very favorite tools are no longer available, namely the very fine Utica Swiss-made PBL sprue cutters, both varieties. They are no longer on dealers' shelves, nor are they on P-B-L's website or product list. I suspect that with the weak dollar, PBL could not longer afford to import them, and the flooding of the modeling market with cheap Pakistan clones by Micro Mark did not help (the Micro Mark cutter WILL cut melted butter but nothing more substantial- making it as a replacement tool a pretty dear item).

Otto Frei has a similar Swiss cutter to the Swiss P-B-L varieties (Dumont No. 15A High Precision Carbon Steel Tweezers 157.312) at @$87; and Wiha has a German-made variety #49501- almost identical @$86, which gives some clue as to what values are involved for fine tools these days. .

Also noted is that in some Otto Frei listings, their outstanding, popular, and precise French- made brass-handle/steel-chuck miniature pin vise #23650 is either just "Out of Stock", or is no longer listed. I have made inquiry.

Although I do take extremely good care of tools (usually!), this certainly is a cautionary note to guard even more closely my P-B-Ls, reserving to cutting pliers any tasks calling for cutting any metals, no matter how small.

Also, once again, with regard to the MicroMark copy, I got exactly what I paid for- performance and quality commensurate with the cheap price. Caveat Emptor.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Okoboji, Iowa

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: NC&StL (was GN) Flat Cars

Bill Welch
 

I have used Modelflex Oxide red on all of my NC&StL cars, open top and house cars for those painted in the yellow stripe period and the mineral red/brown for two in their prewar schemes.

The few colour photos I have seen of their stripped boxcars have a distinctly red cast.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., FRANK PEACOCK <frank3112@...> wrote:


I'm going with freight car red for the color of NC&StL flat cars. About 25-30 years ago Richard told me that railroads generally paint their open tops the same. Since the N&C painted their hoppers and gons FCR that is what I am gonna paint the flats. FHP (Frank H. Peacock)

To: STMFC@...
From: rhendrickson@...
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2010 11:47:25 -0700
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: NC&StL (was GN) Flat Cars




























On Sep 13, 2010, at 10:50 AM, Tim O'Connor wrote:



Ben Hom wrote
A builder's photo of NC&StL 70229 was published in the 1928 and 1931
issues of the Car Builders Cyclopedia.
... and that photo makes the car appear to be painted black.
Later photos from the 1950's appear to be oxide red.


That's my conclusion, too, since I've never found either a color

photo or NC&StL color documentation. FWIW, I painted my model

mineral red.



Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





















Re: NC&StL (was GN) Flat Cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 13, 2010, at 4:19 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

Frank, that's a good rule, but you can't ignore the exceptions. SP's
G-70-8 "G31b" gondolas (Tangent model) were delivered in BLACK, for
example. :-) And Southern was a road that had both black and red open
cars together for a while (and later continued the practice). Photos
are really indispensible IMO.
All true, Tim, but when there are no color photos, you gotta work
with what you have. And I continue to think the NC&StL flats were
mineral red until someone produces positive evidence to the contrary.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Atlas' CN steel rebuild box car...

Terry Link
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve Lucas" <stevelucas3@...>

Now that I've looked at Atlas' photos of the models in N and HO, I'll put
it this way--Foobie alert!

http://www.wig-wag-trains.com/Atlas%20Pages/Atlas%20Pictures/Box-cars/USRA-Rebuilt-Box/45827_CN-O.JPG

for the HO car.

This photo is the O scale car. I don't believe Atlas has posted a photo of
the actual HO scale CN model yet.


Terry Link
Bramalea, Ontario, Canada
www.canadasouthern.com


Re: NC&StL (was GN) Flat Cars

Tim O'Connor
 

Frank, that's a good rule, but you can't ignore the exceptions. SP's
G-70-8 "G31b" gondolas (Tangent model) were delivered in BLACK, for
example. :-) And Southern was a road that had both black and red open
cars together for a while (and later continued the practice). Photos
are really indispensible IMO.

Tim O'Connor

I'm going with freight car red for the color of NC&StL flat cars. About 25-30 years ago Richard told me that railroads generally paint their open tops the same. Since the N&C painted their hoppers and gons FCR that is what I am gonna paint the flats. FHP (Frank H. Peacock)


Northeastern Fallen Flags RPM Meet 10/2/10

bnpmodeler
 

Northeastern Fallen Flags RPM Meet
October 2, 2010, 9AM – 6 PM
!!! NEW VENUE !!!
Ted Blum 4-H Center
310 Milltown Road
Bridgewater, NJ 08807

Greetings all and pardon the multiple posting. The third annual Northeast Fallen Flags Railroad Prototype Modeling meet will take place on Saturday, October 2, 2010, at the Ted Blum 4-H Center, 310 Milltown Road, Bridgewater, NJ, 08807. This spacious venue, just off of NJ Route 202, is also easily accessible from Interstates 78 and 287. Admission is $25.00 at the door and includes a hot Italian Lunch buffet at 1 PM. Also, the 4-H Gingersnaps will be selling a Continental Breakfast of Coffee, Tea, Muffins, Bagels and Danish from 9 until 11:30 AM; soft drinks and coffee will be available throughout the day for a small donation.

As with all RPM meets, the main focus of this gathering is for modelers to get together and bring any models they are working on or have finished, for display and discussion and learning. The model display is the heart of any RPM meet, so bring your work to show around. There are plenty of tables set to a comfortable height for viewing.

Aside from the model display, tentative activities and clinics include:

Vince Lee
"CNJ in the 1960's – a photo scrapbook"
Jim Dalberg
"Modeling Hopper Cars of the Anthracite Roads"
Jim Harr
"Styrofoam modeling: hot-wire foam cutting tools and techniques"
Dave Messer
"Developing a Prototype Operating Scheme for the PRR Northeast Division"
Larry DeYoung
"What a Modeler Can Learn From Running a Short Line Railroad"
Ted Culotta
"TBD"
Michael Mang
"DL&W Operations in Buffalo – the Post-War Era"
Jay Held
"Erie and Erie Lackawanna around Croxton Yard"
Mike Boland
"100 Years of the Long Island Rail Road with Modeling Tips"
David Ramos
"Researching, modeling and operating the New York Central RR's High Line In HO Scale"

Clinics subject to change; clinic schedule will be posted the day of the event.

There will also be prototype model vendors in attendance, and those currently confirmed to attend include:

Stella Scale Models (laser cut prototype models and accessories in HO)
Speedwitch Media (steam-era freight car models, books, decals)
TMB Custom Models (laser cut prototype models and accessories in HO)
Shortline Products (Northeastern prototype RR models and parts)
Motion Solutions/Tom Saxton (Tools, parts, kits, supplies)
Amesville Shops (Pre-1900 prototype HO scale car models)

We will also have a Chinese Auction – please donate new items for sale; proceeds benefit 4H.

And last but not least, this year we are adding two optional, do-it-yourself local layout tours open to NEFFRPM attendees, Jim Grill's N-scale Neshanic River Railroad and Jim Homoki's HO-scale Newark Terminal Division. Open house times and directions will be provided the day of the meet.

We have created both a Yahoo! Group and a FaceBook page for this meet; please visit them at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/neffrpm/ and http://tinyurl.com/2cgcroh to sign up for the latest news. If you have a presentation or clinic you would like to show, or would like to inquire about vending, please contact us at neffrpm@.... Directions to the 4-H Center will be posted on the Yahoo! site as well.

So that we may have an idea of expected attendance, please send an e-mail to neffrpm@... to let us know you are planning on attending, with "Will Attend" in the subject line.

We hope to see you on October 2nd!

Jim Harr
Ralph Heiss
Jan Lush


Re: Atlas' CN steel rebuild box car...

Tim O'Connor
 

Are those sprung trucks on that model?? Are they joking? Just after
the last holdout (Kadee) finally adopted more realistic looking springs,
Atlas moves in the other direction?

I object to the term Foobie, BTW. An incorrect model is not always
a Foobie, even though a Foobie is always incorrect. One must not use
the term indiscriminately or it loses its RPM value.

Tim O'Connor

Benjamin Hom stated that he didn't know if the "Atlas USRA rebuild" was an accuarate model of a CN car.
Now that I've looked at Atlas' photos of the models in N and HO, I'll put it this way--Foobie alert!
http://www.wig-wag-trains.com/Atlas%20Pages/Atlas%20Pictures/Box-cars/USRA-Rebuilt-Box/45827_CN-O.JPG
for the HO car.

Some personal opinion follows...
Close, but no cigar.
Reporting marks, data, and "CANADIAN NATIONAL" lettering are too large. Leaf herald should be centred on panel next to grabirons. Dimensional data font is too large.
Ends should be flush with the sides.
Roof should be Hutchins Dry Lading for this car number; not a flat, rivetted roof.
Stirrups are wrong.
Door is clunky. Camel door rollers missing handle and poorly reporesented on model. And what is that thing that the door slides in? Even Athearn's 40' steel boxcar lower door track was less crude than this.
You can buy this in HO or N--if you want to...
Steve Lucas.


Re: Endangered Tools

Brian Ehni <behni@...>
 

You¹re forgiven for the poor Latin spelling, but that¹s not a proper Latin
phrase in the first place.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illegitimi_non_carborundum

Thanks!
--

Brian P. Ehni




From: Bill Welch <fgexbill@...>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2010 21:51:18 -0000
To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Endangered Tools






Dear Denny and everyone:

I encountered this when trying to find an HO ruler while I continue to find
some of my tools from my move a year ago. I have two, one a long Walthers
example which is good but often feels unwieldy because of its 12 inch or so
length. My short one, which is still eluding me, is I think from "General
Tool" and is about 6-inches and BTW is NOT straight on one side. It is great
for measuring in HO including one section in HO inches. So desperate was I
for a small one right now that I ordered a "Factory second" manufactured for
a company named "Creative Horizons" that no longer sells these rulers. The
price was about $2 and it is straight on both sides and will serve until I
can find my favorite, albeit crooked one. It is straight on the HO edge.

I did order something from H&R Trains and will pick it up. Walthers no
longer offers any under its brand and buying something like this from a
website or catalog is difficult. Some are described as flexible, which is
the LAST thing I want in a ruler.

I am sure my small one will show up and now think it is in the same box with
the small power supply for my little drill and my HO calipers which are
plastic but okay. I wish I had been modeling when PFM offered an HO caliber.

So I echo Denny's Caveat Emptor but also go by the words of Gen. "Vinegar"
Joe Stillwell's advice: "Illegitimum non carborundum." (pardon my poor Latin
spelling)

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , Denny
Anspach <danspach@...> wrote:

Like the advancing thin edge of the wedge, it has come to my attention that
several of our very favorite tools are no longer available, namely the very fine
Utica Swiss-made PBL sprue cutters, both varieties. They are no longer on
dealers' shelves, nor are they on P-B-L's website or product list. I suspect
that with the weak dollar, PBL could not longer afford to import them, and the
flooding of the modeling market with cheap Pakistan clones by Micro Mark did not
help (the Micro Mark cutter WILL cut melted butter but nothing more substantial-
making it as a replacement tool a pretty dear item).

Otto Frei has a similar Swiss cutter to the Swiss P-B-L varieties (Dumont
No. 15A High Precision Carbon Steel Tweezers 157.312) at @$87; and Wiha has a
German-made variety #49501- almost identical @$86, which gives some clue as to
what values are involved for fine tools these days. .

Also noted is that in some Otto Frei listings, their outstanding, popular, and
precise French- made brass-handle/steel-chuck miniature pin vise #23650 is
either just "Out of Stock", or is no longer listed. I have made inquiry.

Although I do take extremely good care of tools (usually!), this certainly is
a cautionary note to guard even more closely my P-B-Ls, reserving to cutting
pliers any tasks calling for cutting any metals, no matter how small.

Also, once again, with regard to the MicroMark copy, I got exactly what I paid
for- performance and quality commensurate with the cheap price. Caveat Emptor.

Denny


Denny S. Anspach, MD
Okoboji, Iowa







Re: Endangered Tools

Bill Welch
 

Dear Denny and everyone:

I encountered this when trying to find an HO ruler while I continue to find some of my tools from my move a year ago. I have two, one a long Walthers example which is good but often feels unwieldy because of its 12 inch or so length. My short one, which is still eluding me, is I think from "General Tool" and is about 6-inches and BTW is NOT straight on one side. It is great for measuring in HO including one section in HO inches. So desperate was I for a small one right now that I ordered a "Factory second" manufactured for a company named "Creative Horizons" that no longer sells these rulers. The price was about $2 and it is straight on both sides and will serve until I can find my favorite, albeit crooked one. It is straight on the HO edge.

I did order something from H&R Trains and will pick it up. Walthers no longer offers any under its brand and buying something like this from a website or catalog is difficult. Some are described as flexible, which is the LAST thing I want in a ruler.

I am sure my small one will show up and now think it is in the same box with the small power supply for my little drill and my HO calipers which are plastic but okay. I wish I had been modeling when PFM offered an HO caliber.

So I echo Denny's Caveat Emptor but also go by the words of Gen. "Vinegar" Joe Stillwell's advice: "Illegitimum non carborundum." (pardon my poor Latin spelling)

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., Denny Anspach <danspach@...> wrote:

Like the advancing thin edge of the wedge, it has come to my attention that several of our very favorite tools are no longer available, namely the very fine Utica Swiss-made PBL sprue cutters, both varieties. They are no longer on dealers' shelves, nor are they on P-B-L's website or product list. I suspect that with the weak dollar, PBL could not longer afford to import them, and the flooding of the modeling market with cheap Pakistan clones by Micro Mark did not help (the Micro Mark cutter WILL cut melted butter but nothing more substantial- making it as a replacement tool a pretty dear item).

Otto Frei has a similar Swiss cutter to the Swiss P-B-L varieties (Dumont No. 15A High Precision Carbon Steel Tweezers 157.312) at @$87; and Wiha has a German-made variety #49501- almost identical @$86, which gives some clue as to what values are involved for fine tools these days. .

Also noted is that in some Otto Frei listings, their outstanding, popular, and precise French- made brass-handle/steel-chuck miniature pin vise #23650 is either just "Out of Stock", or is no longer listed. I have made inquiry.

Although I do take extremely good care of tools (usually!), this certainly is a cautionary note to guard even more closely my P-B-Ls, reserving to cutting pliers any tasks calling for cutting any metals, no matter how small.

Also, once again, with regard to the MicroMark copy, I got exactly what I paid for- performance and quality commensurate with the cheap price. Caveat Emptor.

Denny


Denny S. Anspach, MD
Okoboji, Iowa





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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