Date   

Re: IM PFE R40-25. paint scheme (corrected)

Bill McCoy
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <wpmccoy@...> wrote:

IM shows as their catalog number 47421, PFE 2037, 4329, 2465, and 4781, with the early 2 B&W herald sides and the gothic paint scheme. (silver roof and black ends). I can't find this mixed paint scheme in the PFE book or earlier postings. Is this correct?

Also did IM use the ARM R40-25 ends?

Bill McCoy
Jax, FL


IM PFE R40-25. paint scheme

Bill McCoy
 

IM shows as their catalog number 47421, PFE 2037, 4329, 2465, and 4781, with the early 2 B&W herald sides and the gothic paint scheme. (silver roof and black ends). I can't find this mixed paint scheme in the PFE book or earlier postings. Is this correct?

Also did IM use the ARM R40-25?

Bill McCoy
Jax, FL


Re: Frisco covered hopper

Ed Hawkins
 

On Sep 29, 2010, at 4:58 AM, jerryglow@comcast.net wrote:

Bowser makes 3 different lettered versions of their open side covered
hoopper. I'm concerned with the two with Roman style lettering, one in
black and the other gray. Intermountain has the black car. Are both
versions correct and if so what is the difference (era, number series
or ??)
Jerry,
Frisco had the following cars built to the 1958 cu. ft. design.

83500-83549, 1945, SL-SF
83550-83649, 8-46, SL-SF
83650-83849, 7-48, Mt. Vernon
83850-83889, 2-50, Pullman-Standard
83890-83984, 9-50, Pullman-Standard

I have photos from all but the first group. A builder's photo from the
3rd group is in the 1953 CBC. All cars were originally painted black.
I'm not aware of gray cars, at least in the steam era. All cars had the
"open" sides. The home-built cars had roofs with seam caps and with
hatch covers like CB&Q and MoPac, some ATSF, and some others. The last
3 groups had flat roofs and hatch arrangements like offered by IM. As
is typical, there were some differences in the locking bars, types of
trucks, hand brakes, running boards & brake steps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


N&W G3 Gondola decals

Bill Lane
 

All,



I am sorry if I have asked this before. Has anyone produced a decal set for
the N&W G3 gondola? I imported the G26 and want to do 1 as the G3. Now for
the big wish, it should be someone that produces them on an ALPS because I
want them in ** S Scale ** - for 2 sets.



I don't mind "some" decal bashing, or what I call scissors hell, but the
most important thing for me is matching (in appearance) G26 data with the
other N&W lettering.



I am decaling my G4 now using Greg Komar decals. I got extra sets thinking I
could bash the G3 decals too, but it looks really different.



Any help on how to make this happen would be greatly appreciated.







Thank You,
Bill Lane

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy & PRSL in 1957 in S Scale since 1988

See my finished models at:
<http://www.lanestrains.com/> http://www.lanestrains.com
Look at what has been made in PRR in S Scale!

Custom Train Parts Design
<http://www.lanestrains.com/SolidWorks_Modeling.htm>
http://www.lanestrains.com/SolidWorks_Modeling.htm

PRR Builders Photos Bought, Sold & Traded
(Trading is MUCH preferred)
<http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls>
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls

***Join the PRR T&HS***
The other members are not ALL like me!
<http://www.prrths.com/> http://www.prrths.com
<http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf>
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf

Join the Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Lines Historical Society
It's FREE to join! <http://www.prslhs.com/> http://www.prslhs.com
Preserving The Memory Of The PRSL


Re: shipping kits

Charles Hladik
 

Carey,
Not sure but I think there is a difference between "bulk" media rates
and "media" rates.
Just got a book from Western Ohio in 2 days to Central Virginia via
"media rate".
Chuck Hladik

In a message dated 9/29/2010 12:46:53 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
carey@hcprobst.com writes:




All I can say about media rates it that it took 27 days for a magazine
mailed in NJ using bulk media rates to get to my home in PA under 200
miles away.

It may be cheap but you better warn buyers about the times involved.

Carey

Tony wrote:

I just looked up Media Mail rates -- to ship 20 lbs of books from
California to Massachusetts is less than $10. I always ask for media
mail when ordering books, if it's available from the seller.

Tim O'Connor
--

Carey Probst

Member, M.I.T. Educational Council

Perm: _hcprobst@alum.mit.edu_ (mailto:hcprobst@alum.mit.edu)

A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free State,

the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: IM PFE R40-25. paint scheme

asychis@...
 

IM shows as their catalog number 47421, PFE 2037, 4329, 2465, and 4781,
with the early 2 B&W herald sides and the gothic paint scheme. (silver roof
and black ends). I can't find this mixed paint scheme in the PFE book or
earlier postings. Is this correct?

Also did IM use the ARM R40-25?


Bill,

Yes, InterMountain's R40-25s are our cars reissued with new numbers, and
seemingly new paint schemes. We take no responsibility for InterMountain's
interpretation of correct paint schemes.

Jerry Michels
Amarillo Railroad Museum


Frisco covered hopper

jerryglow2
 

Bowser makes 3 different lettered versions of their open side covered hoopper. I'm concerned with the two with Roman style lettering, one in black and the other gray. Intermountain has the black car. Are both versions correct and if so what is the difference (era, number series or ??)

Jerry Glow


Re: Great Northern flat car

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

Michael

The CB&Q took a similar route with 146 FM-11 and FM-11A 45' flats that it had built in 1928-1930 at Galesburg. It coupled them in pairs, renumbered them to 88000-88072 A/B, reclassed them as FM-11B and used them for tractor loading, but not until 1962.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, September 29, 2010 3:10 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Great Northern flat car


Michael

They were marketed as 89'2" flat cars equipped for farm machinery loading.
Railroad rates for "loose cars" are almost always based on the size of the
car (and union work rules were often based on "cars") so by operating
"articulated" pairs of cars the GN could offer better rates than by simply
operating them as two cars. There were 63 of these "cars" on the roster in
1972. Other car types operated this way included 70 ton airslides.

I don't think that this existed before 1961, so it's after the STMFC era.

Tim O'Connor


Great Western Malting covered hopper

Kujawa's <xark@...>
 

Hi everyone:

I was wondering if anyone had any information or photos of any Great Western
Malting cars or operations. I have an old Con Cor car and an old AHM car
both with GWM markings. Here is the only info I've come up with. Thanks in
advance for any info or photos. Below is the only info I've come up with.

Roger Kujawa
Morton, IL.

Link to photo of car:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/484587126/pic/150610902/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc


Message:

Hi Roger,

I can give you a little bit of information on your cars. I've been working
for GWM for over 25 year as their North American Traffic Manager as well as
GWM was my customer for over 15 years prior. This is what I remember:

Great Western had turned to leasing a fleet of Northern Pacific rail cars
back in the 60's. I cannot tell you how many, but they were the first fleet
of cars that carried the Great Western name on the side. I believe these
were green cars.

Then I believe, if my memory serves me correctly, Great Western leased a
newer fleet of cars in the 70's that were blue with the pyramid type
mountain logo on the side of the car. They were used in a general pool and
not necessarily used solely in California. Great Western Malting owned and
operated two malt plants in the 70's: Vancouver, WA & Los Angeles, CA.

Great Western's leased cars were used to service breweries all along the
west coast such as: Rainier Brewing, Seattle, WA, Lucky Brewing, Vancouver
WA, Olympia Brewing, Tumwater, WA, Anheuser Busch California breweries &
Miller Brewing in Irwindale, CA etc. If any of the leases were solely used
in California, it would have been for a short period of time and had to have
been used for either the Miller Irwindale brewery and/or the Anheuser Busch
La Metro, CA (Los Angeles, CA) brewery. But to my knowledge the leases were
not tagged to any specific malting plant.

The last batch of railcars lease by Great Western Malting were Grey in color
with a black logo. I believe this was in the late 70's or so.

Great Western's fleet of cars hauled "Malt", which is malted grains...or you
could call it "malted barley" and shipped blended malts as specific recipes
to the large breweries in the Western States.

Hope this helps.

sue


Re: Pipe Unions, tees, and elbows in brass

Jared Harper
 

I can testity they are a great product from the old Tomalco line.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Bob McCarthy <thesupplycar@...> wrote:

Howdy!

    If any one reading this list would like real brass unions, tees or elbows, contact me off
list.

Thanks,

Bob McCarthy

--- On Mon, 8/23/10, Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:

From: Jim Betz <jimbetz@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Pipe Unions
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, August 23, 2010, 1:21 AM







 









Hi,



Very short lengths of shrink tubing make very nice HO scale

pipe unions and angle fittings.

Put it on 'loose' and move it to where you want it, when you

want it there, and shrink around the brass wire.

Need it thicker? Use two and shrink the first and then put

the second over it.

Use slightly longer lengths to do "corners". Can even be

used to form "T" joints by using 3 pieces (one on each leg)

and then 'joining' in the middle with some Krystal Klear.

Will hold paint but not real well - acrylics slightly better

than lacquers in this regard. It is better to use a color for

the shrink tubing that 'blends' with the rest of the model

(black usually) ... and the piping color.

You can even use it to 'join' two pieces of scale piping.

For instance if you break a hand rail you can slip on some

shrink tube on one side, align and slide it over the other

so it covers both, and shrink to lock in place.

- Jim

























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Great Northern flat car

Tim O'Connor
 

Michael

They were marketed as 89'2" flat cars equipped for farm machinery loading.
Railroad rates for "loose cars" are almost always based on the size of the
car (and union work rules were often based on "cars") so by operating
"articulated" pairs of cars the GN could offer better rates than by simply
operating them as two cars. There were 63 of these "cars" on the roster in
1972. Other car types operated this way included 70 ton airslides.

I don't think that this existed before 1961, so it's after the STMFC era.

Tim O'Connor

At 9/28/2010 09:30 PM Tuesday, you wrote:
At the following URL a photo of two Great Northern flat cars is shown. I know the photo was taken in 1969 nine years after this groups cut-off date but the two cars look to be 40' flats from sometime earlier than 1960. The two cars look as if they are being used as single car, notice the name "Great Northern" is only on the closest car and a car number is on the second car. My question is: Were these cars used this way before the 1960's? And what were they used for? Thanks for any help.
http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/gn/gn64531ajs.jpg
Michael Bishop


Re: Great Northern flat car

Larry Wolohon
 

Michael,



Per my copy of GN Color Guide to Freight & Passenger Equipment by David Hickox, this is a single car as you noted made of 2 1929 Siems Stemble Co. flat cars.

They were combined in 1966 to haul farm implements as an articulated car rather than order or build longer flat cars.



So this is outside the scope of STMFC partly at least.



Larry W.

----- Original Message -----
From: "goldrod_1" <goldrod_1@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, September 28, 2010 9:30:54 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Great Northern flat car

 




At the following URL a photo of two Great Northern flat cars is shown. I know the photo was taken in 1969 nine years after this groups cut-off date but the two cars look to be 40' flats from sometime earlier than 1960. The two cars look as if they are being used as single car, notice the name "Great Northern" is only on the closest car and a car number is on the second car. My question is: Were these cars used this way before the 1960's? And what were they used for? Thanks for any help.
http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/gn/gn64531ajs.jpg
Michael Bishop


Re: shipping kits

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony

I just looked up Media Mail rates -- to ship 20 lbs of books from
California to Massachusetts is less than $10. I always ask for media
mail when ordering books, if it's available from the seller.

Tim O'Connor

For the lighter packages, yes, but NOT true in general. In book
shipping, we look to see where the "crossover" is with UPS, often
around two or three books.

Tony Thompson


Great Northern flat car

goldrod_1 <goldrod_1@...>
 

At the following URL a photo of two Great Northern flat cars is shown. I know the photo was taken in 1969 nine years after this groups cut-off date but the two cars look to be 40' flats from sometime earlier than 1960. The two cars look as if they are being used as single car, notice the name "Great Northern" is only on the closest car and a car number is on the second car. My question is: Were these cars used this way before the 1960's? And what were they used for? Thanks for any help.
http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/gn/gn64531ajs.jpg
Michael Bishop


Re: shipping kits

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Rich Orr wrote:
Generally, USPS parcel post is the least expensive. I ship everything by Priority mail with tracking.
For the lighter packages, yes, but NOT true in general. In book shipping, we look to see where the "crossover" is with UPS, often around two or three books.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: shipping kits

SUVCWORR@...
 

Generally, USPS parcel post is the least expensive. I ship everything by Priority mail with tracking.

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: ed_mines <ed_mines@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, Sep 23, 2010 2:43 pm
Subject: [STMFC] shipping kits


Can you guys recommend the most economical way to ship kits?

I'm shipping a P2K gon in it's original box and 2 Athearn gon shells. The P2K
box is a little longer than usual so I put everything in a bigger box.

USPO wanted to charge $8+. Staples (who I thought represented UPS)wanted $12+

Ed



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: shipping kits

Tim O'Connor
 

In addition to weight of 13 oz, a first class package cannot be longer
than 12" in any dimension. First class is the cheapest way to go whenever
possible! Priority Mail/Fixed Price boxes are all 12" or smaller in all
dimensions, until you go to the LARGE box -- and then the price is very
high! So if you're shipping HO passenger cars, UPS probably is the less
expensive route. I recently had to look all this up trying to ship a
long car to New Zealand -- the price jumped from $18 to $40 at the 12"
dimension threshold.

Tim O'Connor

Single car shipping, the goal should be to keep the weight below 13 ounces,
above that there is a big increase to Priority Mail, and about $2.00 more. 1st
class is also non-zone rated, which means a cross crountry shipping will not
cost extra over a near destination. Priority Mail charges hefty extra fees to
farther away destinations.

I will frequently wrap a HO kit with kraft paper. Most freight cars will then
ship 1st class. I sent two kraft wrapped flat cars to a STMFC member; to keep
the total under 13 ounces, I had to remove one of the instructions. The same two
cars in a box would have been about $7.00 instead of the $3.80.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Bob Liljestrand's (aka Bob's Photos) Current Address, Telephone or Email?

Scott Pitzer
 

Based on STFMC messages over several years, this guy should be on the 10 Least Findable People List, somewhere below Osama Bin Laden, but (nowadays) somewhere above J.D. Salinger.
Scott Pitzer

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Ed Hawkins <hawk0621@...> wrote:


On Aug 21, 2010, at 12:10 PM, Bob Slavinski wrote:

Hi there....I goolged Bob's Photo's in Ansonia, CT and got a phone
number of
(203) 734-6666.....and an address of 37 Spring Street....hope this
helps...
Bob Slavinski
Max & Bob,
Bob Liljestrand moved to Kentucky several years ago. His current
address is P.O. Box 52, Wallingford, KY 40193, phone 606-845-3323.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins




Re: flat car missing floor boards

William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Ed & Group,

In the mid-1970s -- well into the future for this group -- the Kansas City Railroad Museum requested a flatcar from the KCS to use as a stage for a weekend event. The car we received was in general service and it did have about one-third of its floor timbers missing. It was a good thing we had enough planking and plywood laying around to cover the holes. Or at least most of them.

Back to the present... I can remember seeing some rather well used flat cars in the late 1950s.

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA

On Sep 28, 2010, at 2:33 PM, ed_mines wrote:

Has anyone else seen a flat car with floor boards missing? In revenue service? In the steam era?

About 1980 I saw a car like this in a small train switching my then employer GAF. We were not the only customer; there were 2 other cars besides ours and the flat car. The car was missing 6-8 feet of floorboards. You cound clearly seen the underframe and stringers.

The flat may have been used as a spacer or pusher to get the other cars in/out of a building. Spacer cars like this are frequently seen in pictures on the Long Island Railroad.

ED


Re: shipping kits

Andy Carlson
 

Single car shipping, the goal should be to keep the weight below 13 ounces,
above that there is a big increase to Priority Mail, and about $2.00 more. 1st
class is also non-zone rated, which means a cross crountry shipping will not
cost extra over a near destination. Priority Mail charges hefty extra fees to
farther away destinations.

I will frequently wrap a HO kit with kraft paper. Most freight cars will then
ship 1st class. I sent two kraft wrapped flat cars to a STMFC member; to keep
the total under 13 ounces, I had to remove one of the instructions. The same two
cars in a box would have been about $7.00 instead of the $3.80.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

95321 - 95340 of 188713