Date   

Re: Champ Decals website

Tim O'Connor
 

Tom, the internet is worldwide. What can Congress do if someone in
another country decides to copy the web site and host it off shore?
This is already widely done -- If I felt like it I could go right now
to any number of web sites and download complete copies of recent
Hollywood movies. Every 12 year old in America knows this...

Tim

At 10/3/2010 03:35 AM Sunday, you wrote:
Tim,

That is debatable! I think that is one of the internet issues that will come up before congress some time in the spring!''Tom


Re: MILW 271199

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Oct 3, 2010, at 2:18 AM, Stephan wrote (responding to a post by
Jim Dick):

Jim,

I just ran across a photo of this car while researching something
else, and it started me searching for info on them.

The photo is the same one you posted, but was published in the 1928
Car Builders Cyclopedia, p131 - and may have been accompanied by a
drawing on another page.

The car, 271199, is a fifty foot SS car, w/double doors both
sides, staggered. Hutchins roof, Howe truss side framing with a
quite visually apparent 9 inch rolled steel channel under the door
opening, that in concert with a 4 x 3 5/16 inch channel above the
set of Youngstown pressed steel doors.
As of 1/53, there were 448 active cars in this series with auxiliary
doors either removed or secured closed and 6' main door openings,
plus 9 cars with all side doors secured closed, side discharge
chutes, and roof hatches for sawdust loading. There were also 311
cars remaining in the very similar 271500-271999 series - on these
the auxiliary doors were still functional and door openings were 12'
wide - plus 3 cars converted for sawdust loading. I have in-service
photos from the '50s of cars in both series which I can scan if that
would be helpful.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Speaking of trucks

brianleppert@att.net
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, cepropst@... wrote:

Brian, will you be at Naperville this year?
No, I won't be there.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV


N&W Schaeffer 70T trucks

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Does anyone know of a ready source for these trucks in HO?

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Re: Railshop H30 covered hoppers?

hummerdaves
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "dakkinder" <dakkinder@...> wrote:

Has anyone built this kit ? How did it go for you. Are there any tips you can give ?
I'm thinking about getting this one .

Doug Kinder
Doug I have 2 that I'm doing and they go together well, bend the etched brass parts with a single edge razor and watch where the etchings go, one
has a defect card holder that should be on the A end. Take your time doing the roof hardware also and there is a cast nub that needs to be remove from the center sill, all in all not a bad kit to build.
Dave Schroedle
www,protoweathering.com/SMF


Re: Speaking of trucks

Clark Propst
 

Gosh, you don't suppose Kadee used that photo do you : )))

Thanks Ed!
Clark Propst


The Pullman-Standard builder's photo from this lot just happened to >be 44324. The car had A-3 Ride Control trucks.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Speaking of trucks

Clark Propst
 

Thanks to everyone for the detective work on the Kato truck. Makes my life a lot easier : )

Brian, will you be at Naperville this year?

Matt, I've replaced the Kato wheels sets with Reboxx also, but didn't notice any differece. Unless the Reboxx rolled worse?
Maybe I'm using the wrong size, but used the size Reboxx recommends?

Clark Propst


MILW 271199

steve_wintner
 

Jim,

I just ran across a photo of this car while researching something else, and it started me searching for info on them.

The photo is the same one you posted, but was published in the 1928 Car Builders Cyclopedia, p131 - and may have been accompanied by a drawing on another page.

Since I did not find any info in this list, I will continue my search elsewhere - will let you know if I find more info. Did you turn up anything elsewhere ?

have fun
Steve Wintner

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "np328" <jcdworkingonthenp@...> wrote:

This last Saturday afternoon I was at the Minneapolis Public Library collecting some data for a friend. While paging through the collection of Railway Ages, in one of them , Vol. 82, Jan-June 1927, page 1208, I happened to come across this article about a CMStP&P boxcar with 12 ft side door openings.

I have placed a picture of this car from the article in the photos area. It is waiting for the moderators approval - look for CMStP&P PC&M 50 XM

I thought this looked like an interesting car. Note the ladder set up on the right side. Glancing through the article I noticed one paragraph, the fifth paragraph.

The fifth paragraph told of "The steel center posts are fitted with wood fillers and have an automatic locking attachment. The grain door nailing strips at the door post fillers have been especially designed so as to fit flush with the lining and thus avoid damage to the lading or annoyance to the shippers when loading automobiles. Possible difficulty is also avoided when these cars are loaded with grain or some similar commodity for which scrapers are used for unloading purposes."

The car, 271199, is a fifty foot SS car, w/double doors both sides, staggered. Hutchins roof, Howe truss side framing with a
quite visually apparent 9 inch rolled steel channel under the door opening, that in concert with a 4 x 3 5/16 inch channel above the
set of Youngstown pressed steel doors.

Of prior musings about double door cars being used in grain service; the above offers no proof that these ever were used in
grain service, only that these double door cars had provisions
for such use built into them at time of manufacture, and they could have been.

In concert with this, there are several interesting articles on the movement of Canadian grain in the 1928 issues of Railway Age. It would appear in that time frame, a large amount of grain moved through US ports. New York, NY, getting the principle export volume, Boston, Portland, ME, and even Newport News, VA. were other ports of note.

Would anyone be able to fill in a further background on this series of car?
And -was it still around in that form in 1953 ?

And one last question, are any models of this car available in HO?
Jim Dick - St. Paul


Re: Champ Decals website

tmolsen@...
 

Tim,

That is debatable! I think that is one of the internet issues that will come up before congress some time in the spring!''Tom


Re: Tank Cars to Transport Molasses

Allen Rueter
 

Victor, have you looked at the OpSig* Industry files?

--
Allen Rueter
StLouis MO




________________________________
From: wabash2813 <reporterllc@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sat, October 2, 2010 12:44:05 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tank Cars to Transport Molasses


Now all I need to do is figure out a likely origin for my molasses. Sugar beets
manufactured in the Midwest?

"Jeff Wilson's Industries Along the Tracks 3" shows a 1959 map of sugar beet
manufacturing facilities in the U.S.

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: BRASS ELBOWS, TEE'S AND UNIONS

Donald Ford <ford.donald77@...>
 

Bill
I was also unable to get to him sure could use some of those elbows for a loco
project.  The orignal message didn't give enough of his address.
Don Ford
Kanab UT




________________________________
From: WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@HAWAII.RR.COM>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sat, October 2, 2010 5:01:52 PM
Subject: [STMFC] BRASS ELBOWS, TEE'S AND UNIONS

 
BRASS ELBOWS, TEE_,___
I have been trying (unsuccessfully) to contact Bob Macarthy dba The
Supply Company who
noted these items on the list several days ago. Does anyone know of
him or how to contact him?

Bill Pardie









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Tank Cars to Transport Molasses

Cyril Durrenberger
 

No sugar cane was raised in East Texas (or at least what those of us from Texas call East Texas) and not in Texas at all after about 1929 until the 1970's, well after the time period of this group.  The sugar refinery in Sugarland, Texas received the raw sugar from Louisiana.

Cyril Durrenberger

--- On Sat, 10/2/10, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:

From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tank Cars to Transport Molasses
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Saturday, October 2, 2010, 1:11 PM







 











Plenty of sugar cane in Louisiana and eastern Texas too.



Another source of molasses is wood fiber -- there was an article

some while back of molasses production at a fibre-board mill in Duluth.



Tim O'Connor



At 10/2/2010 01:44 PM Saturday, you wrote:

Now all I need to do is figure out a likely origin for my molasses. Sugar beets manufactured in the Midwest?
"Jeff Wilson's Industries Along the Tracks 3" shows a 1959 map of sugar beet manufacturing facilities in the U.S.
Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana





















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: cotton seed oil (was Tank Cars to Transport Molasses)

switchengines <jrs060@...>
 

Tim, let me add something to this reposted messages. Richard has forgot
the largest of the cotton oil tank car owners, Sco Tank Line (Southern Cotton
Oil Company) of New Orleans, Louisiana, SCOX. They rostered 386 tank cars
in cotton oil service in the January 1945 ORER.

Happiness, Jerry Stewart

It's Autumn in Woodstock, Illinois

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

I assume this would also apply to the transportion of cotton seed oil
from cotton presses. I am modeling a facility in Texas that shipped
cotton seed oil. One of their customers was a paint manufacturer in
Louisiana. Would this typically be a UTLX, GATX, (whatever) tanker,
reserved for other than petroleum use? Photos????
Charles Etheredge
Austin, Texas
Charles,

I think (hope) that Richard Hendrickson will forgive me for reposting
this old message (from 1998) to the old Freightcars mailing list. I hope
it answers your question.

Tim O'Connor

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Shawn, cottonseed oil was one of the major commodities shipped in tank
cars. Those cars were usually equipped with heater coils, as cottonseed oil
tends to congeal when cold; heater pipes were optional on TM/ICC-103 class
cars, as there was no special AAR or ICC designation or class suffix for
cars that were so equipped. The best brief account for your purposes is
contained in the book "General American Tank Car Journeys," published by
GATC in 1931, which I have excerpted below:

"Cottonseed oil....ranges from pale yellow to a red-black mixture,
depending on the nature and conditions of the seed and the method of
extraction and refinement.... When the seeds are crushed the oil, which is
dark in color, is refined by heating with a solution of caustic soda, and
clarified by filtration. In this refining, the residue containing some of
the caustic soda...is sold to the soap industry, while the clarified oil,
stearin and palmitin are extracted by chilling and pressing. This solid
fat, known as stearno, is used in making oleomargarine. Enormous
quantities of cottonseed oil move in tank cars to be used as soap stocks,
lubricants, salad oils, cooking oils, water-proofing compositions, packing
sardines and as a base for cosmetic creams. The press cake from cottonseed
oil, called cottonseed meal, is used in large quantities as the organic
nitrogen constituent of fertilizers and also as a cattle feed."

FWIW, the weight of cottonseed oil is given as 7.75 lbs. per gallon.

In a quick scan of my 8/47 ORER, I find several other tank car owners whose
cars were used largely or partly for cotton oil shipments, including The
Best Foods, Inc. (BFX, 92 cars), Colgate-Palmolive-Peet (TPCX, 52 cars),
Cuero Cotton Oil & Mfg. Co. (CUMX, 4 cars), Durkee Div. of the Glidden Co.
(DFFX, 11 cars), Fels & Co. (FELX, 6 cars), and Texas Vegetable Oil Co.
(TVOX, 3 cars). No doubt there were others; "oil" and "refining" companies
weren't always in the petroleum business, but it may not be evident from
their ORER entries that what they transported was, in fact, cottonseed oil.
These private owner cars are only the tip of the iceberg, however, as car
leasing companies like General American, Union Tank Line, Shippers Car
Line, and John H. Grace assigned many cars to cottonseed oil service. As
you model the Cotton Belt, you are safe in assuming that there was
substantial tank car traffic in cottonseed oil on that RR.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Re: IC 50' SS DD box, series 40250-40499

Bill Welch
 

There is a reinforcement under the doors, strengthened by the two outer door posts that extend through it.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "al_brown03" <abrown@...> wrote:

That's real interesting! I'll buy copies the next time I see Bob. The big thing I don't know is whether the side sill's straight, or if there's a heavier brace under the doors.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@> wrote:

I have photos of IC 40476 and 40394 from Bob's Photo. Info on the back says they were both photographed at Ft. Bragg, NC on the same date, 10-17-51, which I would be skeptical about. 3/3/3 Dreadnaught ends and what appears to be a Hutchins roof and fishbelly u/f. Five panels to the right of the two steel doors and 3 1/2 panels to the left of the doors, the half panel being a truncated panel with diagonal brace. Bracing is a Howe truss. Doors are Youngstown.

This is one of several 50' SS cars begging to be done in resin.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "al_brown03" <abrown@> wrote:

Can anyone direct me to a photo of this series? I recently came across an old Walthers kit, that I built about 15 years ago, and I think I'll re-detail it for the prototype it's closest to.

-- TIA --

-- Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Speaking of trucks

Ed Hawkins
 

On Oct 2, 2010, at 3:27 PM, cepropst@q.com wrote:

Thanks Ed,
The Kato website says they're 70 ton! They were made for their 1958
cu ft covered hopper. Glad to hear they're 50 ton !!!

The N&W Kadee model is #44324. I have documents for 2 cars in that
series.
N&W 44456 44000-44999 XM furniture 1/4/59
N&W 44672 44000-44999 XM lumber 7/17/59
Clark,
The Pullman-Standard builder's photo from this lot just happened to be
44324. The car had A-3 Ride Control trucks.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: cotton seed oil (was Tank Cars to Transport Molasses)

Charles Etheredge
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

I assume this would also apply to the transportion of cotton seed oil
from cotton presses. I am modeling a facility in Texas that shipped
cotton seed oil. One of their customers was a paint manufacturer in
Louisiana. Would this typically be a UTLX, GATX, (whatever) tanker,
reserved for other than petroleum use? Photos????
Charles Etheredge
Austin, Texas
Charles,

I think (hope) that Richard Hendrickson will forgive me for reposting
this old message (from 1998) to the old Freightcars mailing list. I hope
it answers your question.

Tim O'Connor

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Shawn, cottonseed oil was one of the major commodities shipped in tank
cars. Those cars were usually equipped with heater coils, as cottonseed oil
tends to congeal when cold; heater pipes were optional on TM/ICC-103 class
cars, as there was no special AAR or ICC designation or class suffix for
cars that were so equipped. The best brief account for your purposes is
contained in the book "General American Tank Car Journeys," published by
GATC in 1931, which I have excerpted below:

"Cottonseed oil....ranges from pale yellow to a red-black mixture,
depending on the nature and conditions of the seed and the method of
extraction and refinement.... When the seeds are crushed the oil, which is
dark in color, is refined by heating with a solution of caustic soda, and
clarified by filtration. In this refining, the residue containing some of
the caustic soda...is sold to the soap industry, while the clarified oil,
stearin and palmitin are extracted by chilling and pressing. This solid
fat, known as stearno, is used in making oleomargarine. Enormous
quantities of cottonseed oil move in tank cars to be used as soap stocks,
lubricants, salad oils, cooking oils, water-proofing compositions, packing
sardines and as a base for cosmetic creams. The press cake from cottonseed
oil, called cottonseed meal, is used in large quantities as the organic
nitrogen constituent of fertilizers and also as a cattle feed."

FWIW, the weight of cottonseed oil is given as 7.75 lbs. per gallon.

In a quick scan of my 8/47 ORER, I find several other tank car owners whose
cars were used largely or partly for cotton oil shipments, including The
Best Foods, Inc. (BFX, 92 cars), Colgate-Palmolive-Peet (TPCX, 52 cars),
Cuero Cotton Oil & Mfg. Co. (CUMX, 4 cars), Durkee Div. of the Glidden Co.
(DFFX, 11 cars), Fels & Co. (FELX, 6 cars), and Texas Vegetable Oil Co.
(TVOX, 3 cars). No doubt there were others; "oil" and "refining" companies
weren't always in the petroleum business, but it may not be evident from
their ORER entries that what they transported was, in fact, cottonseed oil.
These private owner cars are only the tip of the iceberg, however, as car
leasing companies like General American, Union Tank Line, Shippers Car
Line, and John H. Grace assigned many cars to cottonseed oil service. As
you model the Cotton Belt, you are safe in assuming that there was
substantial tank car traffic in cottonseed oil on that RR.

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520
Thanks so much Tim. This helps me out a lot. As I don't offhand remember any specific tank car kit ( or RTR) made for this nor any decals for an undec. kit, I will have to go with some leased cars.

Charles Etheredge
Austin, Texas


Re: BRASS ELBOWS, TEE'S AND UNIONS

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Bill,
 
 
Try this one; thesupplycar@yahoo.com; this should get the results you seek for Bob McCarthy.
 
Fred Freitas

--- On Sat, 10/2/10, WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@HAWAII.RR.COM> wrote:


From: WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@HAWAII.RR.COM>
Subject: [STMFC] BRASS ELBOWS, TEE'S AND UNIONS
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Saturday, October 2, 2010, 7:01 PM


 



BRASS ELBOWS, TEE_,___
I have been trying (unsuccessfully) to contact Bob Macarthy dba The
Supply Company who
noted these items on the list several days ago. Does anyone know of
him or how to contact him?

Bill Pardie










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: IC 50' SS DD box, series 40250-40499

Ray Breyer
 

Can anyone direct me to a photo of
this series? I recently came across an old Walthers kit,
that I built about 15 years ago, and I think I'll re-detail
it for the prototype it's closest to.
Hi Al,

IRM has IC 40285 in its collection, and has several detail photos of the car on their website, including decent closeups of the ends and underframe.

Regards,
Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


BRASS ELBOWS, TEE'S AND UNIONS

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

BRASS ELBOWS, TEE_,___
I have been trying (unsuccessfully) to contact Bob Macarthy dba The
Supply Company who
noted these items on the list several days ago. Does anyone know of
him or how to contact him?

Bill Pardie


Re: Speaking of trucks

Matt S.
 

I have replaced all the wheelsets in my Kato ASF trucks with Reboxx wheels...A bit spendy, but it certainly makes them look and roll better...

Matt Sugerman
Ft. Worth, TX

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

The Katos are beautiful models, but I've never been happy with the wheels
or axles, or their performance.

Tim O'Connor

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