Date   

Re: Running crap

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jack Burgess wrote:
If I know an operator is a detail-oriented scratchbuilder, I will relax the restrictions on them but I need to personally know that. (Darnaby can rerail all the cars he needs.)
I always thought this was a good guideline: don't touch it unless YOU are a scratchbuilder.
I greatly agree with Clark Propst about near-coupler details, air hoses and cut levers. They just seem to fly off the models on an operating layout. I haven't operated my current equipment that much, but I've pretty much stopped putting on cut levers so I'll be ready when the time comes <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: cotton seed oil (was Tank Cars to Transport Molasses)

switchengines <jrs060@...>
 

Norm, I would love to help you with a photo, but I can not. In all my years
of tracking down interesting photos of freight equipment I have never run
across a picture of any of the SCOX cars. What we can probably surmise
from the ORER listings is that they appear to be yet another car fleet
operator that purchased most of their cars on the used market. The listing
only gives us rated general gallonage capacities for the cars (not actual
gallonages), and is a hodgepodge of different weight capacities (axel
ratings), so it's not of too much help. Even if you did get lucky and find a
photo of a car it is not going to tell you much about what the total fleet
looked like as it's probably made up of many different car builders tank
car types.

Yet another tank car fleet mystery, Happiness, Jerry Stewart

Woodstock, Illinois

--- In STMFC@..., Norm Buckhart <norm@...> wrote:

Jerry - would you know of any photo sources for the SCOX tank cars?
Norm Buckhart

On Oct 2, 2010, at 6:08 PM, switchengines wrote:

Tim, let me add something to this reposted messages. Richard has
forgot
the largest of the cotton oil tank car owners, Sco Tank Line
(Southern Cotton
Oil Company) of New Orleans, Louisiana, SCOX. They rostered 386 tank
cars
in cotton oil service in the January 1945 ORER.

Happiness, Jerry Stewart

It's Autumn in Woodstock, Illinois


Re: Running crap was : Re: Accurail single-sheathed box cars and SL-SF single-sheathed box cars.

Andrew Miller <aslmmiller@...>
 

Why do you wait unitl dawn? ;-)

Andy Miller

----- Original Message -----
From: Pierre
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, October 04, 2010 1:25 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Running crap was : Re: Accurail single-sheathed box cars and SL-SF single-sheathed box cars.



Firing squad at dawn?
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "Armand Premo" <armprem2@...> wrote:
>
> How do you handle your "Ham Handed"crew members? Armand Premo
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: cepropst@...
> To: STMFC@...
> Sent: Monday, October 04, 2010 11:25 AM
> Subject: [STMFC] Running crap was : Re: Accurail single-sheathed box cars and SL-SF single-sheathed box cars.
>
>
>
> Most of the cars I've found with damage can be repaired is a couple of minutes. Last one had a missing tack broad (what's the correct name again?). Found one in the scrap box, glued it on and painted it. Box car was back in service.
>
> Models made by Accurail and Bowser usually have protoypes. There have been several articles written on how to make them look like they have separate parts. If you choose the correct paint scheme. Along with some nice weathering they will do nicely.
>
> IMO while Gene is waiting for 'floor money' he should be building all the kits his accomulated over the years and not worrying about any other freight cars until his layout is running.
>
> Focus Old Jedi
>
> Clark Propst
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 9.0.862 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3176 - Release Date: 10/04/10 02:35:00
>
>
>
>


Re: Advice for RPM Naperville

charles slater
 

Matt, in July I flew from Bakersfield, Ca. (small airport) to Denver for the Santa Fe Modelers annual convention and took along four powered engines and several freight cars all in my cary on bag and had NO trouble at either airpoart. In Bakersfield they scanned my bag and I told the TSA people I had model trains in it and they said they could see that on the screen.
Leaving Denver the TSA people told me I had model trains in my bag and exactly what they were. He said he sees four engines and several freight cars. I asked him how many ribbons he saw in there and he said four, which was correct. They turned the monitor so I could see what was on it and you could see everything in the bag, I think you could almost read the lettering on the cars. He even asked me if I had gone to Caboose Hobbies while I was in town. Just make sure you don't have more than 6 oz. of liquid in the bag and have it in a zip lock bag, and take it out for inspection.
At did not need to unpack anything at either airport. Their equiptment is much better now than it was several years ago when I flew last.
Charlie Slater
Bakersfield. Ca.






To: STMFC@...
From: camas74@...
Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2010 05:23:53 +0000
Subject: [STMFC] Advice for RPM Naperville






All,

This will be the first time I may bring something to display...

I am seeking recommendations for transporting models on the plane...

How do you pack them, (carefully, I know) so they don't get damaged???

Has anyone had a issues with security??? They have lead weights in them and I am concerned the TSA may be difficult when screening them...

Thanks,

Matt Sugerman,
Ft Worth, TX





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Advice for RPM Naperville

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
Bottom line? It is much better to ship models via UPS/FedEX/USPS than to fly with them.
I dispute this, though I have great confidence in FedEx. The package services DO have lots of machinery to handle the boxes and only the most careful and thorough packing (and thoughtful design of same) will protect models.

2) Pack cars so that they will be scanned on their sides - this minimizes the x-ray appearance of the weights, and shows the wheels as wheels.
Good advice, and something I try to do also. Just be sure you remember how the MODELS are oriented in your bag before you place it on the belt <g>.

4) Be an OBVIOUS train NUT (wear a train shirt for example). This way, they'll know you're a nut, but a harmless one. The time I had the most trouble was when I was nicely dressed. Make some offhand comment as you bag goes into screening like "Its amazing how many model trains you can cram into a carry-on <G>". Say this loudly enough that the person on the x-ray machine can hear as it provides a mental explanation of what they see and they are more likely not to wonder "what the heck is THAT!".
Good idea to wear a train shirt (or vest!!). I do sometimes say to the screener, "I have train models in the bag," and as Bruce says, I think that can help. But most of the horror stories of screeners not recognizing models are from earlier years. Today, most of them have seen it all, and are far less likely to overreact to a model.

5) If your bag gets picked for screening, you will almost never be allowed to unpack your bag for TSA, so expect that they will and pack accordingly.
7) If the agent is not being careful enough for you, politely but firmly ask them to stop and call their supervisor.
Very good advice. Asking for a supervisor at the first sign of trouble DOES work, and supervisors are (in TSA at least) far more customer-oriented than most of the grunts.
My bottom line? Yes, you can fly with your models, as long as you're aware of what's going to happen and how to handle trouble. But I still don't do it casually.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Running crap was : Re: Accurail single-sheathed box cars and SL-SF single-sheathed box cars.

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Armand asked:
<
< How do you handle your "Ham Handed"crew members?

When I have an operating session with modelers who have not previously
operated on my layout, I do an 15-minute orientation for everyone giving a
general overview of the operations, how to know which toggles operate which
turnouts, clearance point paint colors, the need to line all turnouts to the
mainline position, etc. I also make sure that everyone knows that NO ONE IS
ALLOWED to touch the equipment. If there is a derailment, they are to call
me and I'll take care of it. Cars are NOT to be picked up to uncouple them.
TTs and switchlists are not allowed to be placed on the layout nor elbows.

I've never had a problem with visiting operators not understanding why I
insist on this level of "hands off". If I know an operator is a
detail-oriented scratchbuilder, I will relax the restrictions on them but I
need to personally know that. (Darnaby can rerail all the cars he needs.)

But for this approach to work, you need to have good track work with few if
any derailments (operator error doesn't count and I usually have someone
forget to set a derail and go off of the track..they do work <g>). You also
need to block the layout so that, when someone goes through a turnout the
wrong way, it doesn't shut down the whole layout (which causes everyone to
feel the need to push their engine to re-establish power).

Just my approach...


Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Running crap was : Re: Accurail single-sheathed box cars and SL-SF single-sheathed box cars.

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Firing squad at dawn?
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "Armand Premo" <armprem2@...> wrote:

How do you handle your "Ham Handed"crew members? Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: cepropst@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, October 04, 2010 11:25 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Running crap was : Re: Accurail single-sheathed box cars and SL-SF single-sheathed box cars.



Most of the cars I've found with damage can be repaired is a couple of minutes. Last one had a missing tack broad (what's the correct name again?). Found one in the scrap box, glued it on and painted it. Box car was back in service.

Models made by Accurail and Bowser usually have protoypes. There have been several articles written on how to make them look like they have separate parts. If you choose the correct paint scheme. Along with some nice weathering they will do nicely.

IMO while Gene is waiting for 'floor money' he should be building all the kits his accomulated over the years and not worrying about any other freight cars until his layout is running.

Focus Old Jedi

Clark Propst






------------------------------------------------------------------------------



No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 9.0.862 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3176 - Release Date: 10/04/10 02:35:00




Running crap was : Re: Accurail single-sheathed box cars and SL-SF single-sheathed box cars.

Bill Welch
 

Are they not Placard Boards and Route Card holders to which their namesakes are tacked?

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., cepropst@... wrote:

Most of the cars I've found with damage can be repaired is a couple of minutes. Last one had a missing tack broad (what's the correct name again?). Found one in the scrap box, glued it on and painted it. Box car was back in service.

Models made by Accurail and Bowser usually have protoypes. There have been several articles written on how to make them look like they have separate parts. If you choose the correct paint scheme. Along with some nice weathering they will do nicely.

IMO while Gene is waiting for 'floor money' he should be building all the kits his accomulated over the years and not worrying about any other freight cars until his layout is running.

Focus Old Jedi

Clark Propst


Re: Running crap was : Re: Accurail single-sheathed box cars and SL-SF single-sheathed box cars.

Armand Premo
 

How do you handle your "Ham Handed"crew members? Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: cepropst@q.com
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, October 04, 2010 11:25 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Running crap was : Re: Accurail single-sheathed box cars and SL-SF single-sheathed box cars.



Most of the cars I've found with damage can be repaired is a couple of minutes. Last one had a missing tack broad (what's the correct name again?). Found one in the scrap box, glued it on and painted it. Box car was back in service.

Models made by Accurail and Bowser usually have protoypes. There have been several articles written on how to make them look like they have separate parts. If you choose the correct paint scheme. Along with some nice weathering they will do nicely.

IMO while Gene is waiting for 'floor money' he should be building all the kits his accomulated over the years and not worrying about any other freight cars until his layout is running.

Focus Old Jedi

Clark Propst






------------------------------------------------------------------------------



No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 9.0.862 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3176 - Release Date: 10/04/10 02:35:00


Re: Advice for RPM Naperville

Jared Harper
 

In July I attended the Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society convention in Denver and wanted to display two grain elevators. I ended up sending them UPS, very well wrapped. When they got to Denver one was missing a small ventilator and the other had its flexible loading chute broken off. I was able to reglue them without too much trouble. Shipping them was expensive, over $100 round trip. I sent them to the convention chair and he kindly sent them back.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Re: Advice for RPM Naperville

Tim O'Connor
 

Since 9/11, airlines have temporarily "lost" my luggage three
times. Once I found out why - the spare AA batteries in my camera
bag (which was in my suitcase) must have looked like a bomb to
someone in the TSA -- they'd obviously been in the suitcase. Since
those incidents I never check bags any more, and I never take models
with me anymore unless I drive myself. And when I buy stuff at the
show in Naperville or at Des Plaines, I have it shipped home if I
am flying.

Tim O'Connor

I'll strongly second Pierre's advice, with the added warning that
checked luggage sometimes does go astray and may disappear forever
into the fourth dimension. Some years ago, the security bozos
inflicted some major damage to several of my models when I took them
in a carry-on bag to Mike Brock's Prototype Rails meet in Florida.
Typically, they aren't at all careful when unwrapping models for
inspection but won't let you do it yourself. As a result of that
experience, I never take models with me when I'm traveling by
airliner. The only airplane I'll carry them in is my own airplane,
where I'm the only one responsible for "security." Unfortunately,
that means I can't take models for display to events that are more
than a few hundred miles from home. Just one of the negative side
effects of the paranoia about terrorism.
Richard Hendrickson


Resin is tough

Clark Propst
 

I have an F&C CP mini-box that has hit the floor a couple of times. Once it was pulled off on a curve with three other plastic cars. The resin car sustained the least damage. Besides it's a flat kit, it breaks at the joints, just glue it back together. The last time I dropped it. I picked it up, one ladder had fallen off. I glued it back on and put it on the track. It wouldn't roll. Further inspection found the wheel sets all were forced up out of their sideframe dimples. The car is like a cat, landed on it's feet and most have 9...well...7 now, lives : ))
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Running crap

Tim O'Connor
 

Bill

On a private home layout, where people don't have access while you're not
there, you can run top quality equipment including resin and brass. But on
my club layout, stuff gets shoved into drawers between op sessions (including
locomotives!) and members keep TONGS to pick up derailed cars they can't
reach without bending over or climbing under the layout to reach. There is
not an undamaged tank car on the layout. Scores of cars have broken stirrups,
missing parts, etc. that are long gone by the time anyone notices. You are
a lucky guy Bill!

Tim O'Connor

As a layout owner I strongly feel that I have to put the best product out
there for the crews as they are doing me a favor by coming over and making
the layout come alive for me. There are nearly 500 resin cars on the layout
and after nearly 200 sessions there has been no serious damage. Just the
annoying stray brake wheel, ladder or grab that I find along the right of
way and collect in a little pile on the work bench. Eventually, the parts
catch up with the car. Yesterday I found a car missing a tack board and,
sure enough, it was in the pile.

Bill Darnaby


Running crap was : Re: Accurail single-sheathed box cars and SL-SF single-sheathed box cars.

Clark Propst
 

Most of the cars I've found with damage can be repaired is a couple of minutes. Last one had a missing tack broad (what's the correct name again?). Found one in the scrap box, glued it on and painted it. Box car was back in service.

Models made by Accurail and Bowser usually have protoypes. There have been several articles written on how to make them look like they have separate parts. If you choose the correct paint scheme. Along with some nice weathering they will do nicely.

IMO while Gene is waiting for 'floor money' he should be building all the kits his accomulated over the years and not worrying about any other freight cars until his layout is running.

Focus Old Jedi

Clark Propst


Re: Advice for RPM Naperville

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Oct 4, 2010, at 5:50 AM, Pierre wrote:

Matt,
Some years ago I had a near run in with security at Toronto airport
with models in my carry on. The weights, truck springs, and other
metal bits sent the agent into a bit of a tailspin. In spite of
repeated assurances that they were models and to please let me
handle them, some damage occured. Words were exchanged, which
attracted more security attention.
I would suggest that you pack very well and put them in checked
luggage, with the boxes clearly labeled as to their contents. I
find the security screeners not to be the brightest.
Pierre Oliver
I'll strongly second Pierre's advice, with the added warning that
checked luggage sometimes does go astray and may disappear forever
into the fourth dimension. Some years ago, the security bozos
inflicted some major damage to several of my models when I took them
in a carry-on bag to Mike Brock's Prototype Rails meet in Florida.
Typically, they aren't at all careful when unwrapping models for
inspection but won't let you do it yourself. As a result of that
experience, I never take models with me when I'm traveling by
airliner. The only airplane I'll carry them in is my own airplane,
where I'm the only one responsible for "security." Unfortunately,
that means I can't take models for display to events that are more
than a few hundred miles from home. Just one of the negative side
effects of the paranoia about terrorism.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Advice for RPM Naperville

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

GUYZ,
 
The few shows I attend with models in hand, I drive to them. Being retired is a luxury not all can enjoy. From what I have seen, the best thing is to ship models ahead of your departure marked, Display Pieces - Fragile. Address to yourself as arriving guest on [date]. The hotel will take very good care of the shipment, they want your continued business !
Ship them home via UPS from most hotels. Remember, you cannot overdue the soft packing materials. If you buy too much, then wrap them in t-shirts and socks. Everythnig goes home anyway. Guess y'all know how  learned that one! My wife hasn't caught on to this in years; thinks I'm smart using the soiled laundry for packing. Never wonders about what took it's place in the suitcase. Ah, the things we do sometimes.
I had one run in with a TSA agent and vowed, never again. I agree with the statement that not all of them were in the top of the class, and their understanding is less than a mackrel when it comes to models / toys, etc..  Mine thought a Bowser loco was a pipe bomb and called the disposal unit to the counter. Were it not for my ID from the Sheriff's Dept and my willingness to open the box, there would have been a large bill delivered to my door for security services. Yes, they know you, and they send a bill. Flyers be advised.
 
Fred Freitas

--- On Mon, 10/4/10, Pierre <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:


From: Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Advice for RPM Naperville
To: STMFC@...
Date: Monday, October 4, 2010, 8:50 AM


 



Matt,
Some years ago I had a near run in with security at Toronto airport with models in my carry on. The weights, truck springs, and other metal bits sent the agent into a bit of a tailspin. In spite of repeated assurances that they were models and to please let me handle them, some damage occured. Words were exchanged, which attracted more security attention.
I would suggest that you pack very well and put them in checked luggage, with the boxes clearly labeled as to their contents. I find the security screeners not to be the brightest.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "Camas74" <camas74@...> wrote:

All,

This will be the first time I may bring something to display...

I am seeking recommendations for transporting models on the plane...

How do you pack them, (carefully, I know) so they don't get damaged???

Has anyone had a issues with security??? They have lead weights in them and I am concerned the TSA may be difficult when screening them...

Thanks,

Matt Sugerman,
Ft Worth, TX


Re: Running crap was : Re: Accurail single-sheathed box cars and SL-SF single-sheathed box cars.

Armand Premo
 

When cars lose parts I put them back in their original box with a "Bad Order"slip.They are not put back into operation until repaired.If the mishap occurs during an op session the car in question is placed on the nearest empty track not to disrupt the session.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: william darnaby
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, October 04, 2010 9:59 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Running crap was : Re: Accurail single-sheathed box cars and SL-SF single-sheathed box cars.



As a layout owner I strongly feel that I have to put the best product out
there for the crews as they are doing me a favor by coming over and making
the layout come alive for me. There are nearly 500 resin cars on the layout
and after nearly 200 sessions there has been no serious damage. Just the
annoying stray brake wheel, ladder or grab that I find along the right of
way and collect in a little pile on the work bench. Eventually, the parts
catch up with the car. Yesterday I found a car missing a tack board and,
sure enough, it was in the pile.

Bill Darnaby






------------------------------------------------------------------------------



No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 9.0.856 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3176 - Release Date: 10/04/10 02:35:00


Re: Advice for RPM Naperville

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Bruce makes some good points about getting there early, being respectful and
polite when working with TSA agents, etc. I've only taken a few models with
me to events and they have been resin kits or scratchbuilt models. I would
never ship such models via UPS, etc. since resin models can't take the abuse
than plastic kits might be able to take (dropping onto conveyor belts for
example) and therefore have always taken them in carryon.

For such models, I build custom boxes from 1/8" plywood. I use small brass
hinges so that the top, front, and at least one end of the box are hinged.
The boxes are sized for the particular model and the model sits on a piece
of dense foam and the ends, front, top, and back all have soft foam glued on
them and positioned in a way miss the details. The box is sized so that the
foam gently but securely holds the model in place. The sides, ends, and top
of the box are kept closed with rubber bands around the box. It sounds like
a lot of work but, with a table saw, you can put together a box in an hour
or so.

I too have told TSA agents that there is a museum quality model in my carry
on (I don't recall a time that my carryon with a model didn't get pulled for
hand screening). They will never let you unpack a bag but after they have
removed the wood box, they have allowed me to open it. If not, it is easy to
tell them which side needs to be up and have it on the table when they open
it so that it doesn't fall out. I've never had someone need to remove the
model from the box but if they insisted, I'd take Bruce's suggestion and ask
for a supervisor unless they allowed me to do it.


Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: Running crap was : Re: Accurail single-sheathed box cars and SL-SF single-sheathed box cars.

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Clark and friends,

In general I agree with you about operators being generally careful with equipment, though I haven't been in an operating group for many years (long before RC and Proto 2000). However, children can be a problem with carefully built freight cars. At the request of one of my wife's work friends, I allowed his two pre-teen boys to run my small layout when they visited our house. I finally had to politely close things down when they got too rough with the equipment, though fortunately nothing was at that point broken. So when I later purged my layout of mass market plastic, I retained a dozen or so of the better cars with plastic grabs that could take rougher treatment by visiting youngsters: mostly Accurail and Bowser. If something happens to these like a trip to the floor, I won't be heartbroken.

Kind regards,


Garth Groff

On 10/4/2010 9:43 AM, Clark and Eileen wrote:
Gene Green wrote: "I don't want visiting engineers or conductors unintentionally damaging a resin car while rerailing it."

Gene and all,
My layout is operated twice a month. Most of my rolling stock is resin, the rest has separate details (hoppers are the exception). I regularly operate on three other layouts and have been to the "Op till you drop" weekend marathons. Guys try to handle other's equipment with respect. Trick is to not to give them a reason to touch your stuff : ))

Damage does occur to my cars. It's a price I'm willing to pay to have the most realistic layout possible. Damage is mostly to the plastic models, resin cars are tough. The most common damage is to anything near the coupler. What air hoses I did put on, that haven't been knocked off, I've removed. I like uncoupling levers. Plastic ones disappear quickly. I've had to reglue a couple wire ones.
My P2K tank cars are really beat up. This winter I'll replace most of the plastic hand rails with wire. Something I should have done to begin with.

I think durability starts during assembly. Any model with plastic detail parts should have as many replaced as possible while on the workbench. I recently bought a RTR car in a weak moment. I knocked a corner step off getting it out of the box. The model went straight to the work desk for refurbishing and of course weathering, which includes reweigh dates and chalk marks, before it was put into service.

I feel modeling is about pushing yourself to be better. It's a self gratification thing. If you want an operating layout then modeling has to be your main focus. You can't be a good golfer if you don't play regularly. You also have to know your comfort level. If you've tried to build a couple of resin kits and are frustrated with the results, then maybe you should shy away from them. But, you won't know till you've tried a few.

Operators are different than most on this list. One of the reasons is you can't build resin kits and build a layout at the same time, but most disturbing to me is the fact they don't care. Rolling stock is just a piece in a broad game.
What really ticks me off is when at a train show a guy says "I just bring Athearn cars because I don't want damage my good stuff". I have no time for that attitude!!

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Scalpel---was Re: Air brush suggestions...

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

I always imagined scalpels to be flexible. Apparently that is not the case.
Gene Green

101921 - 101940 of 195507