Date   

Re: ORER assistance

Eric Hansmann
 

Brian,

I covered the W&LE fleet of 1926 on my blog earlier this year. Here's the link:

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2010/06/21/wle-freight-car-fleet-of-1926/

Eric



Eric Hansmann
Chagrin Falls, Ohio
Come to RPM-East this March:
http://www.hansmanns.org/rpm_east/2011.htm

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Brian J Carlson" <prrk41361@...> wrote:

I'm about to start an article for our NKPHTS magazine on the NKP Freight car
fleet. I'd like to augment my ORER data. Since I model 1957 most of my
issues revolve around this time frame. I'm looking for people willing to
scan the NKP and WLE sections of the ORERs from the 20's thru 1950. It would
not have to be every issue obviously but I'd like to build up sufficient
information to develop a relatively complete picture. If anyone is
interested in helping me with this project please contact me OFF LIST.
Thanks. I'm thinking I'll have the basis for a clinic or two for RPM meets
as I go too.

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY
prrk41361@...


What happened to the Freightcars Digest?

Eric
 

What happened to the Freightcars Digest? It was run by Richard Hosker.
It just disappeared around March of 2007 or so.

They had archives at:

http://sunny16.photo.tntech.edu/~richard/Freightcars/archive/archive.html

It's a dead link now.

They had some good information.


Eric Petersson


Re: SHIPPING PAINT TO "FOREIGN LANDS"

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Bill ,
Welcome to the brave new world!
It is nearly impossible now to move small amounts of solvent or alcohol based products around North America. I can not get Neo-Lube sent to me "legally" unless I either import a huge amount or have it mailed to a postal box near the border and I go and get it.
The CNLines SIG has had to go through hoops to get it's line of Scalecoat based paints into Canada.
And yet we see case loads of all kinds of solvents, lacquers and other chemicals in our auto care stores. How does turpentine get to Michaels?
It's all highly frustrating and rather illogical.
Wish I had an answer for you.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...> wrote:



OK. Hawaii is not a foreign land, however, it might as well
be when it
comes to shipping Scaleccoat or Floquil. Does anyone else
living outside
the continental US know of a shipper that will handle this
material?

Thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Mechanical Reefers

Bill Welch
 

No, propelled systems are powered by internal combustion engines, non-propelled have no power source of any kind.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, RDG2124 <RDG2124@...> wrote:

Assume by propelled and non-propelled, you are referring to systems driven by a motor and systems with the compressor driven from the axle, respectively?


Evan Leisey
Bennett, CO



-----Original Message-----
From: lnbill <fgexbill@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, Nov 11, 2010 12:14 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Mechanical Reefers




I will doing a clinic on the "FGE/WFE/BRE Mechanicals: 1948-1957" at Cocoa Beach in January. FGE conducted trial w/9 systems beginning in 1948 to see which system could keep a load at 0 degrees and below and survive the riggers of being in a train. Four of these were "propelled" and the balance had no power source or were not propelled. None of the unpropelled systems made it past the trials either for economics or durability or both.

In 1951 FGE placed the first mechanical cars into revenue service using either diesel powered systems or gasoline powered systems. These were 40-ft cars followed fairly quickly w/50-ft. cars (diesel only). As initially conceived these were for frozen commodities only, but interest in "All Purpose" cars followed quickly. However demand kept even these cars in frozen food service.

More in January.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, RDG2124 <RDG2124@> wrote:


If within the discussion period of this list, when did mechanical reefers enter service? Assume since passenger cars began using mechanical air conditioning in the late 30's that reefers would have been soon to follow or did they precede passenger cars?

The discussion of roses being shipped via reefers prompted questions, other than the obvious labor intensity and icing delays of the iced cars, what are the pros and cons of the ice versus the mechanical cars. As I know only of flowers being shipped in iced reefers, assume that humidity was a concern.

Thank you,

Evan Leisey
Bennett, CO



















One Week Left -- Annual PRR Modeler's Needs Assessment Survey

Jerry Britton
 

Every November, the Keystone Crossings site conducts an "Annual PRR
Modeler's Needs Assessment Survey".

The survey asks respondents to list their top three desired models in each
of several categories, including steam power, diesel power, electric
power, freight rolling stock, passenger rolling stock, etc.

Ballots are typically available for one week and are then summarized on
Keystone Crossings.

Summaries are also sent to several dozen manufacturers. Though our survey
is unscientific, and doesn't take into account quantities each modeler may
desire, we have noted that each year many of our top desires are announced
as products within 12-18 months. So perhaps this data provides a "pulse
point" to the industry.

The ballot is now open and runs through 5:00 p.m., Friday, November 19th.

You will find the ballot and past results here...

http://kc.pennsyrr.com/survey_2010.php

Thank you for your participation!
--
Jerry Britton,___


Re: SHIPPING PAINT TO "FOREIGN LANDS"

Storey Lindsay
 

Bill,

The problem is not the shipper, it's the USPS.

Storey Lindsay
Celje, Slovenia

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
WILLIAM PARDIE
Sent: Friday, November 12, 2010 3:47 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] SHIPPING PAINT TO "FOREIGN LANDS"



OK. Hawaii is not a foreign land, however, it might as well
be when it
comes to shipping Scaleccoat or Floquil. Does anyone else
living outside
the continental US know of a shipper that will handle this
material?

Thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie












------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: SHIPPING PAINT TO "FOREIGN LANDS"

Tim O'Connor
 

I think in the case of the ocean, travelling on a boat qualifies
as being on the "ground".

US Post has a ground shipping method for these items. It gets an "ORMD"
Blue sticker that forces ground shipment. Of course being in Hawaii
there is no ground Option.
Bill Dixon


Re: CB&Q car classifications

Bill Hirt <whirt@...>
 

Actually to be technically correct, the XM32 had several series:

XM-32 : CB&Q 30000 - 33827 Built Havelock 1940-1942
XM-32 : CB&Q 34000 - 34171 Built Havelock 1942
XM-32 : CB&Q 34200 - 34599 Built Havelock 1944
XM-32 : CB&Q 34900 - 34999 Built Havelock 1944 (Express trucks)
XM-32 : FW&D 8001-8500 Built Havelock 1944
XM-32A : CB&Q 34600 - 34854 Built Havelock 1945 Improved Steel Ends
XM-32A : CB&Q 29000 - 29499 Built Havelock 1946 Improved Steel Ends
XM-32A : CB&Q 35000 - 36999 Built Havelock 1947 Improved Steel Ends
XM-32A : CB&Q 37000 - 37749 Built Havelock 1948 Improved Steel Ends
XM-32B : CB&Q 17000 - 18399 Built Havelock 1950 Insulmat Ceiling 2 Stringers
XM-32B : C&S 1000 - 1249 Built Havelock 1950 Insulmat Ceiling 2 Stringers
XM-32B : FW&D 8501 - 8750 Built Havelock 1950 Insulmat Ceiling 2 Stringers
XM-32C : CB&Q 18400 - 19399 Built Havelock 1951 Insulmat Ceiling 3 Stringers
XM-32C : C&S 1250 - 1499 Built Havelock 1951 Insulmat Ceiling 3 Stringers
XM-32C: FW&D 8751 - 9000 Built Havelock 1951 Insulmat Ceiling 3 Stringers
XM-32D: CB&Q 60000 - 62249 Built Havelock 1953 Plywood Ceiling
XM-32D: FW&D 9001 - 9250 Built Havelock 1953 Plywood Ceiling
XM-32E : C&S 1500 - 1799 Built Havelock 1957 Door Gussets, Lining, Wider Door Nailing Strip
XM-32F : CB&Q 62500 - 63499 Built Havelock 1958 Nailable Steel Floor

The gap between 33827 and 34000, and between 34171 and 34200, are assumed to be the result of the Havelock Shops running out of material (due to wartime restrictions) before being able to complete the entire ordered series.

Burlington Bulletin #7 by the Burlington Route Historical Society has a complete roster and history of these cars.

To answer Steve's question, you need a diagram book to build a roster by class. Even the Q's self-published equipment summaries I have from 1960 and 1969 did not list class, they are only grouped by series number.

One source for a CB&Q diagram book is <http://www.railfandepot.com/servlet/the-2437/CB%26Q-Freight-Car-Diagrams/Detail>.

Bill Hirt

On 11/11/2010 2:04 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
To make it even more fun, the CB&Q/C&S/FW&D applied the same classification
to 16,000 box cars built from 1945 to the late 1950's, class XM-32. All of
the cars were 40'6" IL and 10'6" IH with 6' doors -- and if you think about
it, that's all that matters to a shipper!

And CB&Q didn't always advance the classes .. in 1959, they acquired new
XM-2 box cars!

Tim O'Connor



I'm doing a lot of research on CB&Q freight cars and I've come into a roadblock of sorts. I've noticed that the CB&Q designates car series with a car class. The tough part is that, unlike the Pennsy, NYC and the NC&StL, they don't put the class name on the car exterior.

For example, I have a picture of CB&Q #44499 which is an single sheathed automobile box car. Thanks to the article on CB&Q wood automobile cars in a RPC issue, I know that it is a class XA-6 car. But when looking at the picture of the car there isn't any place that has it stenciled "XA-6".

So, does anyone know where I can find a good classification and freight car roster for CB&Q cars?

Thanks.
Steve Hedlund

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: SHIPPING PAINT TO "FOREIGN LANDS"

W.R.Dixon
 

On 2010-11-11 9:20 PM, RDG2124 wrote:
True, it is illegal to ship flammables via air. My local hobby shop of choice will not ship if there is any chance it could go by air.
US Post has a ground shipping method for these items. It gets an "ORMD" Blue sticker that forces ground shipment. Of course being in Hawaii there is no ground Option.

Bill Dixon


Re: SHIPPING PAINT TO "FOREIGN LANDS"

Tim O'Connor
 

My friend George Bishop of Accupaint told me he always used
Roadway service (RPS?) -- it's handled like LTL. UPS and USPS
are much more restricted on what they can ship. You might look
at DHL Express too -- they will ship "dangerous goods" subject
to an extra charge.

Tim

OK. Hawaii is not a foreign land, however, it might as well
be when it comes to shipping Scaleccoat or Floquil. Does anyone else
living outsidethe continental US know of a shipper that will handle this
material?
Thanks in advance.
Bill Pardie


Re: SHIPPING PAINT TO "FOREIGN LANDS"

RDG2124 <RDG2124@...>
 

True, it is illegal to ship flammables via air. My local hobby shop of choice will not ship if there is any chance it could go by air.


Evan Leisey
Bennett, CO

-----Original Message-----
From: losgatos48 <losgatos48@comcast.net>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, Nov 11, 2010 8:40 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] SHIPPING PAINT TO "FOREIGN LANDS"




Bill
The Testors website cites that they cannot ship solvent-based paints outside the continental US. Do any of the hobbyshops in Honolulu handle military plastic models? There are a number of the Testor Model Masters colors similar to the railroad paints. Have you considered Poly Scale acrylic paints? I find them to work fairly well.
It is strange in that I can walk into the Ace Hardware in Kihei and buy enamel as well as other retailers on Maui. It is clear that it is not illegal to ship to the Islands. I suspect if comes over in a container rather than by air.

Gene Deimling
Wailea, Hawaii

----- Original Message -----
From: "WILLIAM PARDIE" <PARDIEW001@HAWAII.RR.COM>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, November 11, 2010 6:47:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] SHIPPING PAINT TO "FOREIGN LANDS"



OK. Hawaii is not a foreign land, however, it might as well
be when it
comes to shipping Scaleccoat or Floquil. Does anyone else
living outside
the continental US know of a shipper that will handle this
material?

Thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: SHIPPING PAINT TO "FOREIGN LANDS"

losgatos48@...
 

Bill
The Testors website cites that they cannot ship solvent-based paints outside the continental US. Do any of the hobbyshops in Honolulu handle military plastic models? There are a number of the Testor Model Masters colors similar to the railroad paints. Have you considered Poly Scale acrylic paints? I find them to work fairly well.
It is strange in that I can walk into the Ace Hardware in Kihei and buy enamel as well as other retailers on Maui. It is clear that it is not illegal to ship to the Islands. I suspect if comes over in a container rather than by air.

Gene Deimling
Wailea, Hawaii

----- Original Message -----
From: "WILLIAM PARDIE" <PARDIEW001@HAWAII.RR.COM>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, November 11, 2010 6:47:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] SHIPPING PAINT TO "FOREIGN LANDS"

 






OK. Hawaii is not a foreign land, however, it might as well
be when it
comes to shipping Scaleccoat or Floquil. Does anyone else
living outside
the continental US know of a shipper that will handle this
material?

Thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Mechanical Reefers

RDG2124 <RDG2124@...>
 

Assume by propelled and non-propelled, you are referring to systems driven by a motor and systems with the compressor driven from the axle, respectively?


Evan Leisey
Bennett, CO

-----Original Message-----
From: lnbill <fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, Nov 11, 2010 12:14 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Mechanical Reefers




I will doing a clinic on the "FGE/WFE/BRE Mechanicals: 1948-1957" at Cocoa Beach in January. FGE conducted trial w/9 systems beginning in 1948 to see which system could keep a load at 0 degrees and below and survive the riggers of being in a train. Four of these were "propelled" and the balance had no power source or were not propelled. None of the unpropelled systems made it past the trials either for economics or durability or both.

In 1951 FGE placed the first mechanical cars into revenue service using either diesel powered systems or gasoline powered systems. These were 40-ft cars followed fairly quickly w/50-ft. cars (diesel only). As initially conceived these were for frozen commodities only, but interest in "All Purpose" cars followed quickly. However demand kept even these cars in frozen food service.

More in January.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, RDG2124 <RDG2124@...> wrote:


If within the discussion period of this list, when did mechanical reefers enter service? Assume since passenger cars began using mechanical air conditioning in the late 30's that reefers would have been soon to follow or did they precede passenger cars?

The discussion of roses being shipped via reefers prompted questions, other than the obvious labor intensity and icing delays of the iced cars, what are the pros and cons of the ice versus the mechanical cars. As I know only of flowers being shipped in iced reefers, assume that humidity was a concern.

Thank you,

Evan Leisey
Bennett, CO










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


SHIPPING PAINT TO "FOREIGN LANDS"

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

OK. Hawaii is not a foreign land, however, it might as well
be when it
comes to shipping Scaleccoat or Floquil. Does anyone else
living outside
the continental US know of a shipper that will handle this
material?

Thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie







TAHOE MODEL WORKS Trucks

Andy Carlson
 

Hello everyone,

I have restocked my TMW inventory, and I can now offer every truck in the TMW
line up in both wheelset/less sideframe pairs, or with code 88 semi-scale
wheelsets.

There are now 10 trucks in Brian's growing line, the latest being his 1st 70-ton
truck, the ASF A-3 70-tonner.

All are priced at $6.00/pair; $3.50 for bare sideframe pairs. I am able to
accept PayPal, checks and money orders.

If interested, please contact me off-list at <midcentury@sbcglobal.net>.

Do not respond to this list, please, as a courtesy to everyone. Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: online USRA hopper information

Ed Hawkins
 

On Nov 11, 2010, at 5:16 PM, Ed Hawkins wrote:

Pat,
Forwarding to you some STMFC info on USRA hoppers. I figure you'll
want
to do an article on these at some point.
Ed
STMFC,
I beg everyone's pardon for my message, which was intended to be
forwarded to my good friend Pat Wider rather than to the discussion
group. My apologies for not paying attention to the addressee box.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: online USRA hopper information

Ed Hawkins
 

Pat,
Forwarding to you some STMFC info on USRA hoppers. I figure you'll want
to do an article on these at some point.
Ed


On Nov 11, 2010, at 3:51 PM, Benjamin Hom wrote:

Steve Hedlund asked:
"Does anyone know where there is information on USRA hoppers that is
posted
online?"

The only online listing of USRA hoppers that I know of is on the pay
side of the
RPI website:
http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/article.php?article=2625

"I have lists for the USRA mill gons, USRA composite drop bottom
gons, USRA
double sheathed box cars, and USRA single sheathed box cars so I'm ok
there. But

it would be really great if I can find an online posting of the USRA
2-bay
hoppers."

If you're serious about researching these cars, your best source is
not online,
but
an old-fashioned print source: James E. Lane's "USRA Freight Cars,"
published
in the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society's publication Railroad
History
No.
128.  While not a primary source, it's an indispensable source of
information on
these cars, and includes information on proposed and actual car
allocations. 
Much
of the information cited in the hobby on the USRA freight cars comes
from this
publication, and it can still be found on the secondary market.  For
example, a
copy is currently listed in Railpub's catalog, and a query of some of
the other
sources might turn up other copies.

Ben Hom

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: online USRA hopper information

Benjamin Hom
 

Steve Hedlund asked:
"Does anyone know where there is information on USRA hoppers that is posted
online?"

The only online listing of USRA hoppers that I know of is on the pay side of the
RPI website:
http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/article.php?article=2625

"I have lists for the USRA mill gons, USRA composite drop bottom gons, USRA
double sheathed box cars, and USRA single sheathed box cars so I'm ok there. But

it would be really great if I can find an online posting of the USRA 2-bay
hoppers."

If you're serious about researching these cars, your best source is not online,
but
an old-fashioned print source: James E. Lane's "USRA Freight Cars," published
in the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society's publication Railroad History
No.
128.  While not a primary source, it's an indispensable source of information on
these cars, and includes information on proposed and actual car allocations. 
Much
of the information cited in the hobby on the USRA freight cars comes from this
publication, and it can still be found on the secondary market.  For example, a
copy is currently listed in Railpub's catalog, and a query of some of the other
sources might turn up other copies.


Ben Hom


Re: Ice vs Mechanical Reefers - Off Subject?

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

As an aside, CN's Toronto (now MacMillan) Yard was opened in 1965--with a two-track reefer icing facility in its receiving yard.

Though past the mandate of STMFC, it's interesting to note a large new icing facility being built in the early 1960's.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, water.kresse@... wrote:



I believe they were still discussing moisture concerns with meat with mechanical refrig in the early 1950s . . . until they realized they could start with a goodly amount of artificial moisture and keep it along the trip.  FGE was building new re-icing platforms in 1955 (@ their Russell and Peru yards) along the C&O.  I believe FGE purchased a "demo fleet" of mech reffers in 1956 with diff supplier motor-compressor sets.  They keep their leased re-icing platforms on the C&O until 1972 I believe.



Al Kresse


----- Original Message -----
From: "RDG2124" <RDG2124@...>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, November 11, 2010 9:48:38 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Ice vs Mechanical Reefers - Off Subject?


If within the discussion period of this list, when did mechanical reefers enter service?  Assume since passenger cars began using mechanical air conditioning in the late 30's that reefers would have been soon to follow or did they precede passenger cars?

The discussion of roses being shipped via reefers prompted questions, other than the obvious labor intensity and icing delays of the iced cars, what are the pros and cons of the ice versus the mechanical cars.   As I know only of flowers being shipped in iced reefers, assume that humidity was a concern.

Thank you,

Evan Leisey
Bennett, CO










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





Re: Ice vs Mechanical Reefers - Off Subject?

Tim O'Connor
 

-- If something is yet to happen in the future, how can it interest historians? :-)
-- Mediums? Prophets? Futurists, perhaps? Dennis

People are interested in the future.
Historians are people.
Therefore, Historians are interested in the future.

QED

Tim O'

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