Date   

Re: Larry Jackman 1931-2009

dh30973
 

The subject of Larry came up on Andy Harman's Diesel List the end of November, which prompted several posts. I had the opportunity to get to know Larry pretty well, a little better than the semi casual we do with people we meet through this hobby and keep in touch with with letters, phone calls, e-mail or seeing at various meets. Here is a reposting of what I wrote to Andy's List:

This discussion about Larry Jackman got me digging through my files. I first met Larry through Ed Ryan back in the late 1980's. Ed was working in the Seattle area and somehow had been introduced to Larry (I think it was through Bob Hundman of Mainline Modeler). I went up to see Ed and he took me to visit Larry. Talk about the mad professor/shade tree mechanic, his garage was full of "stuff" for making the parts he was selling under the Smokey Valley line. He had some attachment for his drill press that heated plastic pellets that were then squeezed into a mold that he just clamped in a mill vise. Very basic for small parts. He had several molds that were made from the 3M Tartan process that used a sintered metal powder to capture the detail off of a male master. Thru Ed we became friends.

In 1989 Rail Power Products introduced their SD60 shell, and Larry had the late Joel Berling tool him a three window cab to convert the SD60 into a SD60M. Ed had moved back to Southern California and moved in with me. Larry asked Ed and I to build him a display model for the Houston NMRA Convention for his display. Later I wrote and article on the model that ran in the January 1990 issue of Mainline Modeler. Later that year I had scratch built a Dynamic Brake Section to make a Phase II GP50 out of an Athearn GP50. At Larry's request I made drawings for the dynamic section that I sent to Larry in June 1990. He had Joel make the tooling for the dynamic and then also the Blomberg Type M truck side frame.

Over the years we kept in touch and saw each other at shows, and he was always after me for other ideas that he could make. After he sold Smokey Valley to Bob Wright (Wright Track, who subsiquently sold the Smokey Valley part of it to Larry Burt) there was a period that he could not compete. I think this is when he and is wife moved to Florida, and he got involved in S Scale stuff, and later back into HO with the switcher side frames. His connection with Joel was fruitful for Larry and the hobby. Joel was one of those master "behind the scenes" toolmakers who did projects for lots of small companies from Detail Associates, Smokey Valley, Des Plaines Hobbies, PBL, Hi Tech Details, Wright Track, and many others. He could work from sketches and photographs and produce quality molds. Joel passed away in 2006 not long after Gordon Cannon. Without Joel, Larry lost his toolmaker.

I last saw him at one of the Cocoa Beach meets a few years ago, but he didn't spend much time as his wife was not doing well and he wanted to get back home. Many of you only know him from his stories and/or rants on the various lists but anyone who met him will remember him as someone with a lot of knowledge and a will to share it.

Larry we (at least me) miss you.

Regards

David Hussey
PS Tom, Thanks

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "pullmanboss" <tcmadden@...> wrote:

On the Passenger Car List yesterday, Bill McCoy mentioned "the late Larry Jackman". Further digging uncovered a Social Security death notice for Lawrence Albert Jackman, born 12/11/1931, died 6/9/2009 in Pierce, WA. The notice says previous records can be found at Boca Raton, FL.

This seems to be "our" Larry, and it appears that his passing was not unknown in the RR hobby community. But it was never noted on the STMFC List, which is the reason for this post.

Tom Madden

"I started with nothing, and still have most of it left." Larry Jackman


Re: Unsual routings?

lstt100
 

From my AAR files on Car Service Rules:

"Special Car Order 45 issued in 1942 and reissued in 1948, suspends application of Car Service Rules 2 and 3 as to refrigerator cars owned by the A.T.& S.F. Railway in order to permit handling of SFRD refrigerators on a basis similar to that applying to privately owned railroad-controlled refrigerator cars." (Dated Dec 1954)

The railroad using the SFRD cars was in compliance with the Car Service Rules at the time they were loaded.

Dan Holbrook


Re: Warped Resin Kit

Rich Chrysler <richchrysler@...>
 

I've had great luck by laying the warped castings on a truly flat surface
(detail side up) and carefully warming with a hair dryer to the point of
being hot, but not too hot to touch. A small bag of lead shot pellets laid
over the casting applies gentle and even pressure until it cools..result..an
evenly flat casting with no warpage or twisting, etc.



Rich Chrysler


Re: Salt Service

pullmanboss <tcmadden@...>
 

According to Dobyne's Santa Fe Boxcar book, the loading points for the Santa Fe's Bx3/6 salt cars were Hutchinson, Kansas and Lyons, Kansas.

Tom Madden

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "barryb2again" <Barrybennetttoo@...> wrote:

I have just bought a built-up Westerfield ATSF Bx-3 Salt Sevice box car on eBay UK for $8.70!!!

When this item first appeared I had a rummage through the PFE bible and found only informatiomn on the use of salt, but nothing in regard to it's purchase, storage or distribution.

It is a fact that several companies had salt service cars, it is obvious that they were used to distribute salt to icing stations but what is not so obvious, to me at least, is how the salt was moved to the distribution centres.

T&NO was close to and served the salt mines at New Iberia, La. so gave PFE 'direct' access to a supplier, for instance. I'm reasonably sure that others reefer operators did too.

My thoughts revolve around who and how the salt would be shipped from the supplier, by the usual jumble of available free runners or would PFE, ATSF etc use their own salt service cars to fetch the salt or only transload it for distribution. Would distance from source have been a consideration.

Your thoughts and knowledge on the matter?

Barry Bennett
Coventry, England.


Re: new EJ&E set

Clark Propst
 

These cars would make for a great "Iron Modeler" project.

As I was reading the various approaches to building those J 'things' I thought of an "Iron Modeler" Yahoo group. That would allow attachments, so guys could show their progress.
But, after seeing how few finished "Shake'N'Take" cars are brought back to the CCB meet the next year, a thought is all it is...
Clark Propst


new EJ&E set

jerryglow2
 

At a customer request and thanks to the help here, I've added a new set for a postwar EJ&E boxcar: http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/samples/EJ&E_postwar.jpg

As usual, keep inquiries OFF LIST

Jerry Glow
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/decals/


Salt Service

barryb2again <Barrybennetttoo@...>
 

I have just bought a built-up Westerfield ATSF Bx-3 Salt Sevice box car on eBay UK for $8.70!!!

When this item first appeared I had a rummage through the PFE bible and found only informatiomn on the use of salt, but nothing in regard to it's purchase, storage or distribution.

It is a fact that several companies had salt service cars, it is obvious that they were used to distribute salt to icing stations but what is not so obvious, to me at least, is how the salt was moved to the distribution centres.

T&NO was close to and served the salt mines at New Iberia, La. so gave PFE 'direct' access to a supplier, for instance. I'm reasonably sure that others reefer operators did too.

My thoughts revolve around who and how the salt would be shipped from the supplier, by the usual jumble of available free runners or would PFE, ATSF etc use their own salt service cars to fetch the salt or only transload it for distribution. Would distance from source have been a consideration.

Your thoughts and knowledge on the matter?

Barry Bennett
Coventry, England.


Re: Marker brackets on oil-tank cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Evan Leisey wrote:
Several roads used tank cars coupled behind the tender for additional water to eliminate the expense and delays of water stops. Also, helpers and pushers working long grades also employed auxilary water tanks, sometimes excess tenders from retired locomotives converted to water tenders. The D&RGW, D&SL and the Reading Co. are a few roads that regularly used auxilary water cars. The Reading and the D&SL cars had provisions to display marker lanterns and flags for pusher service.
Entirely true, but the thread began with info about Santa Fe tank cars, and ATSF authority Richard Hendrickson stated that Santa Fe rarely if ever used tank cars this way.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Larry Jackman 1931-2009

al_brown03
 

Larry said once (message #59420) that in Kansas in the thirties they were so poor they couldn't afford color (not color pictures, color itself), so everything was black and white, and he offered "The Wizard of Oz" as proof. Larry, wherever you are, happy journeys, and may everything be in color.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "mike brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

Larry Jackman added to the STMFC real life RR experiences. I particularly
found his stories interesting when they noted how crews would do what was
perhaps easier rather than going strictly according to "rules". The human
touch. For example, his account of using cars from a siding...regardless of
the owner.

He was a valuable resource on the STMFC and, I should note, he attended
Prototype Rails at Cocoa Beach several times and I had interesting
discussions with him there.

Mike Brock


Re: Marker brackets on oil-tank cars

RDG2124 <RDG2124@...>
 

Several roads used tank cars coupled behind the tender for additional water to eliminate the expense and delays of water stops.  Also, helpers and pushers working long grades also employed auxilary water tanks, sometimes excess tenders from retired locomotives converted to water tenders. The D&RGW, D&SL and the Reading Co. are a few roads that regularly used auxilary water cars.  The Reading and the D&SL cars had provisions to display marker lanterns and flags for pusher service. 

Evan Leisey
Bennett, CO

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sat, Dec 11, 2010 6:27 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Marker brackets on oil-tank cars

 
Steve, like Richard I've never seen a tank car of AT&SF (or anyone else)
with marker brackets, but the most obvious reason to have them would be
that the tank car ran at the head or tail of a "train" -- and the "train"
may be as simple as a locomotive and a water (or oil) tank car. Markers
would be required if the train had no caboose to carry them. But the only
scenario I can imagine is a helper engine with a tank car, running light.

Tim O'Connor

I recently picked up the Februray 1941 issue of RAILROAD MAGAZINE, and on page 36 in the "Along the Iron Pike" section, there is an "odd" drawing.

It shows the end of A.T.S.F. tankcar #99921, WITH MARKER BRACKETS!!!

The caption below the drawing states:
&gt;"Marker brackets on oil-tank cars are not very common. This type equipment hauls fuel to fueling stations for oil-burning engines.
Water-tank cars used as supplementary tenders for locomotives also carry markers."
&gt;Here are my questions:

1). Did any other roads do this?

2). How were these cars handled in trains.

Thanks in advance.

Steve Vallee






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Warped Resin Kit

nvrr49@yahoo.com <nvrr49@...>
 

I started a discussion regarding my warped resin gondola kit.  Among the
suggestions was heating it.  I have put some pictures in the nvrr49 photo folder
of how I clamped the assembly down and put it under a lamp for heat.  The first
couple tries changed the warp, but actually made a twist, so then I clamped it
in a reverse to that twist and put it under the lamp again.  Believe it or not,
it came out straight and has stayed that way for a week.  Thanks to all for
their suggestions.
 Kent Hurley
Kansas City, MO


Check out my blog at : http://nvrr49.blogspot.com/


Re: WP 50' SS DD auto/boxcar series 19201-19250

bowie1793
 

Thanks for the added information Guy. I had a feeling that for the initial installation that they would have been 8D's but I had lost documentation in a move many years ago from Herlong, CA.. I am leaning toward the assumption (meaning WAG) that this series did not have the word "automobile" painted on it's side as the information on the right hand door would suffice and that a car in this series, as constructed in 1929, might have received at least one repaint in 20 years of service. Much easier to add that lettering at a later time than to remove it.
 
Joe Jacques

--- On Sat, 12/11/10, guycwilber@aol.com <guycwilber@aol.com> wrote:


From: guycwilber@aol.com <guycwilber@aol.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] WP 50' SS DD auto/boxcar series 19201-19250
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Cc: WPModeler@yahoogroups.com
Date: Saturday, December 11, 2010, 1:10 PM


 



Joseph inquired:

My question is on the P/L scheme for the door markings (if any) for; number of tubes, type rack, and location of the white bar indicating auto rack equipped. Secondly would this car have the word "automobile" like it's sister cars in the 13001-13100 (40001-40100) series. I model Oct. 1949.

Joseph,

The Western Pacific 19201-19250 series were equipped with Evans Type "D" racks with wide wheel pans suitable for both auto and truck loading. All 50 cars were in service for several years beginning in 1937, but the number of cars was reduced to 39 by the time period you model. The following cars were not equipped in April of 1949: 19205, 207, 210, 212, 217, 223, 232, 246, 248, 249, and 250. The same cars are also not listed in April of 1950. As an aside, all the WP 40' cars equipped with Auto~Loaders were out of service by the date of your modeling era.

The series was equipped with 12 floor tubes, and/or "U" floor tie downs. In the case of early loaders there often were only 8 floor tubes along with 4 floor tie downs. Regardless, the door marking would show the Type "D", Type "T" or type "DT" (depending on how WP chose to stencil the car) below the standard 3" white stripe along with the numeral 12 to indicate the number of floor tubes and tie downs. Within the white stripe the inside height at center (10' 6" in this case) would be stenciled in black. Western Pacific reported the cars as being equipped with "DT" racks so I would presume they stenciled the cars as such. Cars not repainted may still have a rectangular box (24" wide x 8" deep) extending down, centered on the white stripe. This was the pre 1939 method of indicating a 50' car was equipped with racks having wide wheel pans.

The Western Pacific Headlight article penned by John Ryckowski has photos and lettering diagrams for the auto cars. My copy, along with photos is in storage at the moment, but another WP fan or collector may be able to supply you with further information.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: EJ&E help needed

Andy Carlson
 

Another option in creating an HO scale model of the 10'0" IH 12 panel car is to
remove the sides from a Branchline-Trains 16 panel 50' boxcar, excise the end 2
panels from each end, adjust width of door opening, and apply the resulting side
to a Intermountain 12 panel boxcar kit, substituting the Red Caboose '37 AAR
roof.


-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA





________________________________
From: ealabhan0 <ealabhan0@live.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sat, December 11, 2010 5:40:15 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: EJ&E help needed


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, jerryglow@... wrote: "A customer pointed out a
photo of EJ&E booxcar #61036 for which I would like to develop a decal set. I
have no information on the car other than finding it in my 7-50 ORER. It's cubic
footage would lead me to believe it was an AAR 37 car yet it does not appear in
the tabulation of those cars on the STMFC site and is a 12 panel car. Any help?"

Jerry,

EJ&E 60900-61399 blt 1948 were postwar 10ft0in IH cars with 12-panel riveted
sides, rectangular panel roof, and r3/4 ends; that is, the uncommon variant of
the shortened 3-over-4 banana-taper Improved Dreadnaught End with a very thin,
narrow (not full-width) rectangular rib on top. They had 8ft wide 7-panel
Superior doors with narrow top panels to accommodate the lower height. Trucks
were ASF A-3 Ride Control; brakewheel was Ajax. References: RMJ Dec 89, and
several photos, in particular a high three-quarter view of EJ&E 61026 from the
collection of John C. LaRue Jr.; unfortunately, my low-def copy is not clear
enough to determine what running board was used.

Delivery scheme was boxcar red with white lettering including the "banded box"
herald, a box "Chicago Outer Belt" with "EJ&E RY" in a belt wrapped around
between "Chicago" and "Outer Belt." Over the next 15 years, these cars were
repainted in several colorful schemes, from green with orange lettering
including the "Around not thru Chicago" map, through green and orange with
billboard lettering, and in the '60s back to all-green, but with all Gothic
lettering including reporting marks, et al, as well as the billboard letters.

One way to model this car is to cut down the height on a CB&T 12-panel 8ft door
boxcar; RMJ Dec 89 includes a Richard Hendrickson article detailing this kitbash
for a 6ft-door SP B-50-25. Another option is to smooth off the sides of a
Branchline 8ft-door undec boxcar, reduce body height by 6in all around, then
scribe for 12 side panels and add Archer rivets.

Hope this helps,
Dave Sieber, Reno NV




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: EJ&E help needed

David Sieber
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, jerryglow@... wrote: "A customer pointed out a photo of EJ&E booxcar #61036 for which I would like to develop a decal set. I have no information on the car other than finding it in my 7-50 ORER. It's cubic footage would lead me to believe it was an AAR 37 car yet it does not appear in the tabulation of those cars on the STMFC site and is a 12 panel car. Any help?"

Jerry,

EJ&E 60900-61399 blt 1948 were postwar 10ft0in IH cars with 12-panel riveted sides, rectangular panel roof, and r3/4 ends; that is, the uncommon variant of the shortened 3-over-4 banana-taper Improved Dreadnaught End with a very thin, narrow (not full-width) rectangular rib on top. They had 8ft wide 7-panel Superior doors with narrow top panels to accommodate the lower height. Trucks were ASF A-3 Ride Control; brakewheel was Ajax. References: RMJ Dec 89, and several photos, in particular a high three-quarter view of EJ&E 61026 from the collection of John C. LaRue Jr.; unfortunately, my low-def copy is not clear enough to determine what running board was used.

Delivery scheme was boxcar red with white lettering including the "banded box" herald, a box "Chicago Outer Belt" with "EJ&E RY" in a belt wrapped around between "Chicago" and "Outer Belt." Over the next 15 years, these cars were repainted in several colorful schemes, from green with orange lettering including the "Around not thru Chicago" map, through green and orange with billboard lettering, and in the '60s back to all-green, but with all Gothic lettering including reporting marks, et al, as well as the billboard letters.

One way to model this car is to cut down the height on a CB&T 12-panel 8ft door boxcar; RMJ Dec 89 includes a Richard Hendrickson article detailing this kitbash for a 6ft-door SP B-50-25. Another option is to smooth off the sides of a Branchline 8ft-door undec boxcar, reduce body height by 6in all around, then scribe for 12 side panels and add Archer rivets.

Hope this helps,
Dave Sieber, Reno NV


Re: Marker brackets on oil-tank cars

Tim O'Connor
 

Steve, like Richard I've never seen a tank car of AT&SF (or anyone else)
with marker brackets, but the most obvious reason to have them would be
that the tank car ran at the head or tail of a "train" -- and the "train"
may be as simple as a locomotive and a water (or oil) tank car. Markers
would be required if the train had no caboose to carry them. But the only
scenario I can imagine is a helper engine with a tank car, running light.

Tim O'Connor

I recently picked up the Februray 1941 issue of RAILROAD MAGAZINE, and on page 36 in the "Along the Iron Pike" section, there is an "odd" drawing.

It shows the end of A.T.S.F. tankcar #99921, WITH MARKER BRACKETS!!!

The caption below the drawing states:

"Marker brackets on oil-tank cars are not very common. This type equipment hauls fuel to fueling stations for oil-burning engines.
Water-tank cars used as supplementary tenders for locomotives also carry markers."

Here are my questions:

1). Did any other roads do this?

2). How were these cars handled in trains.

Thanks in advance.

Steve Vallee


Re: EJ&E help needed

Tim O'Connor
 

Jerry, 61036 came from series 60900-61399 built in 1946 with
12 panel sides, 10'0"IH, 8' doors -- Oops, there's the rub! No
one makes a 10'0"IH box car with 8' doors, much less one with
12 panel sides. I think Ted Culotta was planning to produce
this car, but perhaps Abacus Model Works (Ron DePierre?) will
do it someday http://www.abacusmodelworks.com/products.htm
If Ron comes to Springfield as advertised, I'll ask him a lot
of questions! :-)

However, not to despair. There is still the old trick to cut
down the C&BT Shops 12 panel box car by 6". I did one of these
and it's easier than it sounds. I have a low-res color scan of
EJ&E 61216 in green w/ orange lettering and a low-res scan of
EJ&E 60009 in orange paint w/ green billboard lettering -- That
is the scheme I'd love to build. (This car came from renumbered
series 60000-60124.)

There are also photos in Model Railroading, April 1989, and in
Railmodel Journal, December 1989.

EJ&E also owned 60400-60899 which were 1941 AAR box cars (10'6"IH
and 5/5 ends) with 8' doors and 10 panel sides. This is an easy
kitbash (parts swap) and Sunshine produced a mini-kit with decals
for this one.

EJ&E had some real oddball "AAR 1937"-like box cars with 10 panel
crimped-seam sides, but 7'8" doors and 9'9" IH! That's another one
I'd love to have as a resin kit. I don't know when they were built
but they lasted at least as late as 1978, perhaps longer.

Tim O'Connor

A customer pointed out a photo of EJ&E booxcar #61036 for which I would like to develop a decal set. I have no information on the car other than finding it in my 7-50 ORER. It's cubic footage would lead me to believe it was an AAR 37 car yet it does not appear in the tabulation of those cars on the STMFC site and is a 12 panel car. Any help?

Jerry Glow
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/decals.html


Re: EJ&E help needed

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 11, 2010, at 4:10 AM, jerryglow@comcast.net wrote:

A customer pointed out a photo of EJ&E booxcar #61036 for which I
would like to develop a decal set. I have no information on the car
other than finding it in my 7-50 ORER. It's cubic footage would
lead me to believe it was an AAR 37 car yet it does not appear in
the tabulation of those cars on the STMFC site and is a 12 panel
car. Any help?
Jerry, I have a number of photos of those cars in various paint and
lettering schemes. There was also a group of 40' AAR box cars with
wide door openings built before World War II which had 10 panel sides
and prewar Dreadnaught ends, and it should be possible to develop a
decal set that would cover both groups. However, EJ&E changed paint/
lettering schemes frequently during the life spans of these cars so
you or your customer need to decide the exact point in time you want
the lettering to represent.

Richard Hendrickson


Larry Jackman 1931-2009

mike brock <brockm@...>
 

Larry Jackman added to the STMFC real life RR experiences. I particularly found his stories interesting when they noted how crews would do what was perhaps easier rather than going strictly according to "rules". The human touch. For example, his account of using cars from a siding...regardless of the owner.

He was a valuable resource on the STMFC and, I should note, he attended Prototype Rails at Cocoa Beach several times and I had interesting discussions with him there.

Mike Brock


Re: Larry Jackman 1931-2009

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Thanks, Tom, for posting this. I've thought about Larry from time to time
the last few years, since he stopped posting on the list. I was always
interested to see what he had to say because of the famous multiplicity of
his life experiences. His perspective was unique in my opinion.



The world is a poorer place with him gone.

SGL



On the Passenger Car List yesterday, Bill McCoy mentioned "the late Larry
Jackman". Further digging uncovered a Social Security death notice for
Lawrence Albert Jackman, born 12/11/1931, died 6/9/2009 in Pierce, WA. The
notice says previous records can be found at Boca Raton, FL.

This seems to be "our" Larry, and it appears that his passing was not
unknown in the RR hobby community. But it was never noted on the STMFC List,
which is the reason for this post.

Tom Madden

"I started with nothing, and still have most of it left." Larry Jackman








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Re: Marker brackets on oil-tank cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 11, 2010, at 2:49 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Richard Hendrickson wrote:
Steve, this must have been done on only one or, at most, a very few
cars for some special purpose. Having written the tank car book in
the Santa Fe Railway Historical & Modeling Society's Rolling Stock
Reference series, I've looked at literally hundreds of Santa Fe tank
car photos, and not one shows marker brackets such as you describe.
It would obviously be essential for auxiliary tenders, as
mentioned in the RA quotation.
True, but though it may have happened in one or two unusual
instances, the Santa Fe did not make a practice of using tank cars as
auxiliary tenders.

Richard Hendrickson

88321 - 88340 of 183576