Date   

Re: OK, What Kind of Truck is This?

Bill Schneider
 

There are a number of photos of this truck in the Diver collection, including
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cornelluniversitylibrary/3739524144/in/set-72157621743681242/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cornelluniversitylibrary/3738733693/in/set-72157621743681242/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/cornelluniversitylibrary/3739532930/in/set-72157621743681242/

Frist, as Richard H. points out, the dates are misleading. They refer to the lifespan of the photographer, DeForest Diver. Diver was an engineer on the O&W and also an avid photographer. He also seems to have a bit of inventor in him, holding a patent (http://nyow.org/diver.html)

As for the truck, looking at the other photos it seems that there is some sort of cable system to control sideframe pivot. I seem to recall seeing these photos in print somewhere....

Bill Schneider

From: Richard Hendrickson
Sent: Tuesday, February 08, 2011 11:49 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] OK, What Kind of Truck is This?


On Feb 8, 2011, at 8:07 AM, Richard Wilkens wrote:

From the Cornell University collection:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cornelluniversitylibrary/3739520322/in/
set-72157621743681242/
An experimental truck of some sort, Richard, as I've never seen
evidence of a truck of this design in revenue service. And the
dating is wildly incorrect, as both the side frames and bolster are
steel castings, technology that wasn't developed until decades after
1870. Cast steel U-section side frames weren't introduced until the
1920s. As to the function of those cylindrical housings above the
journal boxes, I can only speculate - so I won't.

Richard Hendrickson







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: OK, What Kind of Truck is This?

Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

If you look closely at the left side of the truck, there appears to be a
bar running thru the U section, continuing under the center of the
sideframe, thence to the other cylinder. In the absence of obvious
springs, and what looks to be rubber absorbers in those cylinders, I think
they act as the springs for the truck.

--
Thanks!

Brian Paul Ehni



From: Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@opendoor.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 8 Feb 2011 08:49:18 -0800
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] OK, What Kind of Truck is This?








On Feb 8, 2011, at 8:07 AM, Richard Wilkens wrote:

From the Cornell University collection:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cornelluniversitylibrary/3739520322/in/
set-72157621743681242/
An experimental truck of some sort, Richard, as I've never seen
evidence of a truck of this design in revenue service. And the
dating is wildly incorrect, as both the side frames and bolster are
steel castings, technology that wasn't developed until decades after
1870. Cast steel U-section side frames weren't introduced until the
1920s. As to the function of those cylindrical housings above the
journal boxes, I can only speculate - so I won't.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: 1948 ACF STANDARDIZED WELDED BOXCAR

Ed Hawkins
 

On Feb 8, 2011, at 10:46 AM, billkeene2004 wrote:

In the September, 1990, issue of Mainline Modeler magazine there is
an article with photos about the ACF Standardized Welded Boxcar. Has
this boxcar ever been offered as a kit in HO Scale?
Bill,
Unfortunately no. While the cars were "standardized" there were three
different door openings (6', 7', and 8'), each of which changed the
side panel spacing. There were also 4 ends that were used on ACF welded
box cars, 3 of which have been offered by Branchline Trains. Some ACF
standardized box cars used proprietary ACF Corrugated Ends and others
used what is called an ACF Riveted Roof, which had a double corrugation
on the roof panels much like the roof used by Armour as discussed in RP
CYC Vol. 21. Other ACF welded box cars used more common Murphy panel or
diagonal panel roofs. Now that Atlas has the Branchline tooling,
perhaps they can be convinced to produce some welded-side box cars.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: OK, What Kind of Truck is This?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 8, 2011, at 8:07 AM, Richard Wilkens wrote:

From the Cornell University collection:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cornelluniversitylibrary/3739520322/in/
set-72157621743681242/
An experimental truck of some sort, Richard, as I've never seen
evidence of a truck of this design in revenue service. And the
dating is wildly incorrect, as both the side frames and bolster are
steel castings, technology that wasn't developed until decades after
1870. Cast steel U-section side frames weren't introduced until the
1920s. As to the function of those cylindrical housings above the
journal boxes, I can only speculate - so I won't.

Richard Hendrickson


1948 ACF STANDARDIZED WELDED BOXCAR

billkeene2004 <wakeene@...>
 

Hello Group,

In the September, 1990, issue of Mainline Modeler magazine there is an article with photos about the ACF Standardized Welded Boxcar. Has this boxcar ever been offered as a kit in HO Scale?

Thank You, in advance, for any information.

Happy Modeling
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


Re: Oil extraction

Benjamin Hom
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:
"Tom, your information is very factual, and undoubtedly entirely correct for the

current era, but it seems that most, if not all, oil unloading cranes used at
the small bulk plants during the steam era had their own suction line arranged
to drop into the tank through the manway, whereupon the material was pumped
out."

At any rate, when it comes to a shipment of oil, I'd rather unload through the
top instead of using the bottom connection.  Unloading through the bottom
connection means you'll end up with the water and sediment that has collected in
the bottom of the tank.


Ben Hom


Re: Oil extraction

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Birkett" <tnbirke@...> wrote:


Usually the eduction line is specified as being 1" off the bottom of the
car.

The dome can stay closed if the car is equipped with a vacuum relief
valve, which is basically a big check valve, but I am not sure when they
came into general use.

Tom
Tom, your information is very factual, and undoubtedly entirely correct for the current era, but it seems that most, if not all, oil unloading cranes used at the small bulk plants during the steam era had their own suction line arranged to drop into the tank through the manway, whereupon the material was pumped out.

Dennis


OK, What Kind of Truck is This?

Richard Wilkens <railsnw@...>
 


Re: Oil extraction

Clark Propst
 

Another question I have is even with tank cars of gasoline did they need to prime the line from the tank car to the pump? I was told they used gear pumps that didn't need primimg.
Clark Propst


Re: Oil extraction

Tom Birkett <tnbirke@...>
 

Jim

There are customers who want to unload out the top of the car for
(perceived) safety reasons. If they have a rack to use during unloading,
they don't have to be under the car at all, except for steam
connections, if used.If a cap on the bottom is cross threaded and won't
come off, ("I already put and 8' cheater pipe on my 36" pipe wrench and
pulled on it with a fork lift:) the top unloading option is pretty
handy. Bottom outlet valves are notorious for being trouble. If the line
that is being unloaded into is low enough and all the connections are
good and tight the car will siphon out the top after the flow is
started.

If the vapor pressure on the car is high enough sometimes no addition
pressure is required.

Usually the eduction line is specified as being 1" off the bottom of the
car.

The dome can stay closed if the car is equipped with a vacuum relief
valve, which is basically a big check valve, but I am not sure when they
came into general use.

Tom


Subject: [STMFC] Re: Oil extraction




I can only admire the ingenuity in engineering methods of heating and
otherwise preparing the contents of a tank car for pressurized pumping
of the material up and out of the dome. But why not let if flow by
gravity and added pressure and/or heating if needed out of the bottom
valve?. Why fight gravity at all, ingenious or not? Thank you in advance
for informing me. Jim here.


Re: Oil extraction

Jeff Coleman
 

The advantage of using the bottom outlet is to empty the tank. If you use the eduction pipe for off loading then there will be at least a couple of inches of product left in the tank as most eduction pipes are 2-21/2 inches off the bottom. The eduction pipe cannot go to the bottom of the tank as the diameter of the tank shell changes when the car is loaded and the pipe will make contact with the shell which in turn requires repair to the tank and or to the eduction pipe.

Jeff Coleman

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "gettheredesigns" <rick@...> wrote:

Seems to me that if they used the bottom outlet, they would have to open the dome anyway to let air in as the tank emptied. And unless the tank was up on a trestle or was draining into an underground tank, they'd still have to pump it. So why mess with uncapping the bottom outlet, hooking up a hose, and opening the valve, when it could all be done through the dome?
Peace, Rick Aylsworth

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Sabol" <jimsabol@> wrote:

I can only admire the ingenuity in engineering methods of heating and otherwise preparing the contents of a tank car for pressurized pumping of the material up and out of the dome. But why not let if flow by gravity and added pressure and/or heating if needed out of the bottom valve?. Why fight gravity at all, ingenious or not? Thank you in advance for informing me. Jim here.

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Re: Oil extraction

gettheredesigns <rick@...>
 

Seems to me that if they used the bottom outlet, they would have to open the dome anyway to let air in as the tank emptied. And unless the tank was up on a trestle or was draining into an underground tank, they'd still have to pump it. So why mess with uncapping the bottom outlet, hooking up a hose, and opening the valve, when it could all be done through the dome?
Peace, Rick Aylsworth

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Sabol" <jimsabol@...> wrote:

I can only admire the ingenuity in engineering methods of heating and otherwise preparing the contents of a tank car for pressurized pumping of the material up and out of the dome. But why not let if flow by gravity and added pressure and/or heating if needed out of the bottom valve?. Why fight gravity at all, ingenious or not? Thank you in advance for informing me. Jim here.



Re: Oil extraction

Jim Sabol
 

I can only admire the ingenuity in engineering methods of heating and otherwise preparing the contents of a tank car for pressurized pumping of the material up and out of the dome. But why not let if flow by gravity and added pressure and/or heating if needed out of the bottom valve?. Why fight gravity at all, ingenious or not? Thank you in advance for informing me. Jim here.


Re: ERDX Reefers

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
Probably (hopefully?) will be covered in the forthcoming book on Merchants Dispatch, which owned ERDX.
It sure is. Be patient, Armand. Won't be much longer.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: ERDX Reefers

Tim O'Connor
 

Probably (hopefully?) will be covered in the forthcoming book on
Merchants Dispatch, which owned ERDX.

Tim O'Connor

At 2/7/2011 10:39 PM Monday, you wrote:
Group,I am seeking information on ERDX reefers.Armand Premo


ERDX Reefers

A. Premo <armprem2@...>
 

Group,I am seeking information on ERDX reefers.Armand Premo

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Get Free Email with Video Mail & Video Chat!
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Re: NKP team era single deck stock car

William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Hello Ed and Group,

Two photos of NKP stock cars can be found in Mainline Modeler, July 1990, page 24 and 28.

Happy Modeling,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On Feb 7, 2011, at 1:32 PM, EdwardM wrote:

Can someone lead me to a good photo of a single deck NKP stock car?

Ed Mines



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Re: NKP team era single deck stock car

foxtrackin50
 

I think there is a couple of photos of NKP single deck stock cars on the Fallen Flags site.
-


Can someone lead me to a good photo of a single deck NKP stock car?

Ed Mines


NKP team era single deck stock car

ed_mines
 

Can someone lead me to a good photo of a single deck NKP stock car?

Ed Mines


Re: FGE lettering change

rwitt_2000
 

There is also the lettering diagram on the Elwood site. I can't see the
original date, but the first revision, "A", was in 1951 with the last
one "C" in 09-10-57.

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/misc-frt/12-D-97.GIF

The drawing shows the Optic lettering, but because of the quality of the
scan much of the information cannot be read. With the wide handhold on
the left, the original looks like it was for the WWII plywood/wood
sheathed reefer.

Bob Witt

Staffan Ehnbom wrote:

I have an FGE lettering arrangement drawing for swinging door cars
dated 6-8-59 showing sans serif lettering.

Staffan Ehnbom

----- Original Message -----
From: lnbill
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 1:19 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: FGE lettering change



Tim's information surprises me. My research had shown this change
occurred in about 1960.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@ wrote:
>
>
> I think the first use of the plain (not Optic) lettering was
> on RBNX insulated box cars in 1959 -- for example, RBNX 81123,
> stencilled "AX 12-59". The earliest use I've seen on FGEX reefers
> is in 1961. I've seen photos of freshly painted/repainted reefers
> in 1958 with Optic lettering.
>
> So I totally agree with Richard, if you model prior to 1960 all
> of your FGE reefers can have the Optic lettering as far as I know.
>
> Tim O'Connor
>
>
>
>
> >I thought that someone who is more of an expert on FGE and its
> >affiliates than I am would respond to this, but apparently no one
did
> >(or posted it off-list). So I took a quick look through my photo
> >collection, and the earliest date I could find for the later
> >lettering style was ca. 1960. I think you can confidently assume
> >that in 1959-60, many, if not all, FGEX cars still had the
earlier
> >Optic block lettering.
> >
> >Richard Hendrickson
>





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