Date   

Re: Frisco covered hoppers

Jim Mischke
 

There are cement plants everywhere, on the Frisco and other railroads.

That would be my educated guess.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

I have a Kadee Frisco covered hopper. Before I weather this, what sorts of
lading would it likely have carried as a Frisco car?

SGL





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Wabash 8141

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Can anyone provide a link to a web-based photo, or send me one off-line, of
this car, or any similar car (double-door 40' box car)?

TIA

SGL





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Re: Murphy ends continued

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Al Kresse wrote:
It was named for Peter Murphy the patent holder and later President of Standard Railway Equipment. I believe those records are now at Northwestern U's trans library. Pullman-Standard even tried to copy one his designs and got caught in the courts.
Thanks, Al. Now that you state it, I think Richard Hendrickson had come with this fact too, but I'd forgotten.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Murphy ends continued

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I am amazed to learn that there actually WAS a Murphy! Thanks, Al, for explaining this.



So we should all now be careful to use the term Murphy, as opposed to murphy.



SGL

It was named for Peter Murphy the patent holder and later President of Standard Railway Equipment. I believe those records are now at Northwestern U's trans library. Pullman-Standard even tried to copy one his designs and got caught in the courts.

Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: tgregmrtn@aol.com <mailto:tgregmrtn%40aol.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, February 27, 2011 9:18:58 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Murphy ends continued

Heavens to Murphy... Like that term? <g>

Greg Martin

Eventually all things merge into one, and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean

Tony writes:




As anyone knows who has perused Cyclopedias, the term "Murphy" is not very
specific for anything. It was used by Standard Railway Equipment to denote
a whole slew of roof designs, some quite different from each other, as well
as a couple of different end designs. As far as Richard Hendrickson and I
have ever been able to determine, the term refers back to an invention of
interlocking metal parts which made the combination water-tight, or
approximately so. Thus the term could be applied to any component which employed
that arrangement. One supposes that "Murphy" refers to the inventor, rather
than to the well-known "Murphy's Law." <g>
If someone on the list knows more, I'd like to hear it.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, _thompson@signaturepress.com <mailto:_thompson%40signaturepress.com> _
(mailto:thompson@signaturepress.com <mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.com> )
Publishers of books on railroad history

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








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Re: paint stripping

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Don, I recently needed to strip paint from a relatively new Athearn gon
(preparatory to the last Shake'n'Take project, actually) and found that
submerging the car in 90% alcohol was incredibly effective. Lifted the
paint off in sheets and took < a half hour. I have also removed lettering
only with 70%, and a Q-tip. And care.



At one time I used brake fluid. CHEAP brake fluid. I bought some fancy
stuff for truck brakes which didn't work worth a damn. I still have the
gallon can that has the brake fluid in it, but I'd only use that on a brass
model IF the alcohol didn't work. Besides, it's a hazmat and can be hard to
get rid of.



I'm sure that Scalecoat's stripper works fine. However, I can't get that at
the local CVS for as little money!



SGL



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
sarbuf
Sent: Monday, February 28, 2011 10:09 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] paint sripping





Hello Group: I was just wondering if anyone has stripped the paint, or at
least the lettering off a Roundhouse (Athearn) Phaudler wood milk car. I
have a couple of painted cars I want to redo and need to get the lettering
off. I would appreciate any suggestion.

Thanks
Don Janes
Sarnia, Ont








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Re: Murphy ends with vertical ribs

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "al_brown03" <abrown@...> wrote:

Dennis,

How does one tell the difference?

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.
Considering the small number of Vulcan ends Chicago-Cleveland seemed to sell, assume they are Murphy unless something says differently :-)

There are illustrations (photos) of both horizontal and vertical Vulcan ends in the 1922 Car Builder's Cyc., and possibly older editions that are now available from Google Books. Interestingly, there is no illustration specifically of a Murphy end in that volume, but there is no shortage of photos of those elsewhere. To my eye, the tips of the tapers seem to come to a sharper point on the Vulcan end, which would indicate that the radius of the crest of the ribs is smaller, and the resulting flats on the flanks of the ribs wider, but since very few of the commercially produces model ends get these right, that's not much to compare. The Vulcan ribs also seem to be a bit wider, but a three panel end still has five ribs per, so they can't be much wider. I've never found a sectional drawing of a Vulcan end (mostly because I never looked for one), nor have I had the opportunity to get up close and personal with one, so photos is about all I can offer.

Dennis


Re: Murphy ends with vertical ribs

al_brown03
 

Dennis,

How does one tell the difference?

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "soolinehistory" <destorzek@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Valoczy" <destron@> wrote:

Fritz,

Best I've been able to gather is that these were known as Vulcan ends.
Let's not mix apples and oranges, so to speak. The Vulcan ends were marketed by the Chicago-Cleveland Car Roofing Co. As mentioned elsewhere, the Murphy name is usually associated with items sold by the Standard Railway Equipment Co. Both companies made corrugated ends, both with the corrugations pressed inwards and outward relative to the flanges that attached to the car side framing, and both made versions with the ribs oriented either horizontal or vertical. Yes, they look somewhat the same, because they were intended for the same purpose, but it's like Ford and Chevy; both make mini-vans and both make pick-up trucks, but that is where the similarity ends.

Dennis


Re: Murphy ends with vertical ribs

Frank Valoczy <destron@...>
 

Dennis,

Not to make a big issue of it, but all the references I've seen to the
ends on the PM cars with the vertical 8+8 ribbing called it a Vulcan end;
I've never seen any reference to vertically-placed Murphy ends. That there
were other vertically-ribbed ends besides Vulcan is quite likely - a CBC
(1926 I think?) has a drawing of an "Atlas" end with vertical ribs, though
it's quite different from the one on the PM cars (or on the WLE cars, or
on the NYC cars, for that matter) - this Atlas end has ribs of different
widths, narrow outboard and wider inboard. Maybe it's just my eyes playing
tricks, but the tapered bit on the ribs on the PM car seem a bit longer
than the tapered part on a car with a 7/8 horizontal panel (NdeM 60891 for
reference - first one I flipped open to in the 1932 ARA book).

Did car builders have a tendency to favour one supplier over another? Or
was the use of ends specified by the railway? Or did the builder get to
make some input on that decision? I ask because the PM cars in question
were built by Western Steel Car & Foundry (the very similar PM cars of
86000 series with 4-panel Hutchins ends were built by Pressed Steel Car
Co.), maybe that might shed light on who made the ends for the cars in
question, which may lead towards an answer to our initial question...

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

soolinehistory wrote:



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Valoczy" <destron@...> wrote:

Fritz,

Best I've been able to gather is that these were known as Vulcan ends.
Let's not mix apples and oranges, so to speak. The Vulcan ends were
marketed by the Chicago-Cleveland Car Roofing Co. As mentioned elsewhere,
the Murphy name is usually associated with items sold by the Standard
Railway Equipment Co. Both companies made corrugated ends, both with the
corrugations pressed inwards and outward relative to the flanges that
attached to the car side framing, and both made versions with the ribs
oriented either horizontal or vertical. Yes, they look somewhat the same,
because they were intended for the same purpose, but it's like Ford and
Chevy; both make mini-vans and both make pick-up trucks, but that is where
the similarity ends.

Dennis



------------------------------------

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Re: Murphy ends with vertical ribs

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Valoczy" <destron@...> wrote:

Fritz,

Best I've been able to gather is that these were known as Vulcan ends.
Let's not mix apples and oranges, so to speak. The Vulcan ends were marketed by the Chicago-Cleveland Car Roofing Co. As mentioned elsewhere, the Murphy name is usually associated with items sold by the Standard Railway Equipment Co. Both companies made corrugated ends, both with the corrugations pressed inwards and outward relative to the flanges that attached to the car side framing, and both made versions with the ribs oriented either horizontal or vertical. Yes, they look somewhat the same, because they were intended for the same purpose, but it's like Ford and Chevy; both make mini-vans and both make pick-up trucks, but that is where the similarity ends.

Dennis


Re: paint sripping

O Fenton Wells
 

I agree with Charlie, it works for me.
Fenton

On Mon, Feb 28, 2011 at 12:54 PM, Charlie D modeling the Mopac
http://mopac51.tripod <omahaduck@gmail.com> wrote:



I use Scalecoat's stripper, it will pretty much remove anything off
plastic. After using I pour it back into the bottle for future use.

Charlie Duckworth




--
Fenton Wells
3047 Creek Run
Sanford NC 27332
919-499-5545
srrfan1401@gmail.com


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: paint sripping

Charlie Duckworth
 

I use Scalecoat's stripper, it will pretty much remove anything off plastic. After using I pour it back into the bottle for future use.

Charlie Duckworth


Re: Murphy ends with vertical ribs

cinderandeight@...
 

Fritz,
Michigan Central Lot 324-B auto box cars (99500-99999) had Vulcan ends
on one end only. There were seven ribs per side, and had the added interest
in that they were also end doors on the cars. Apparently they didn't hold
up well, and were replaced with more conventional end doors later on.
The ribs on these cars had a "negative" pressing, and from what I've
seen in a number of places this is sometimes associated with the term
"Vulcan", although I don't know if there was any "official" reason for this
association.
One down side of vertically alligned end sheets would be that the car
couldn't have a heavier guage sheet on the lower section where it was more
prone to damage from shifting loads.
Rich Burg


Re: paint sripping

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Ray and Friends,

Whether brake fluid works as a paint stripper depends on the paint and the plastic. I used to do this a lot years ago, and it worked well for me with Athearn and Roundhouse paints, but some other paint wouldn't strip at all. Sometimes the paint came off well, but it wouldn't remove the lettering.

The plastic itself can also be dicey. I melted a Bachmann 44-tonner shell in just one night using brake fluid. It is also very bad for some (maybe most) resin castings. I ruined one of Martin's kits in brake fluid after a botched paint job. Fortunately, I was able to salvage the sides and ends, but the floor and roof were really distorted.

I would say, "Use with extreme caution."

Kind regards,


Garth Groff

On 2/28/2011 10:39 AM, Raymond Hatfield wrote:
Hello Don,

I'm new to the list, but this is a subject I can comment on - believe it or not,
automotive brake fluid is a safe and effective paint stripper for models (and
autos as well!) I have a 1:350 scale model of the RMS Titanic I had to totally
strip and repaint, and this worked wonders for me. Use a shallow dish of an
appropriate size to soak it in, and use an old toothbrush to scrub nooks and
crannies

Raymond L. Hatfield


Re: paint sripping

Dennis Williams
 

I would use caution for some, very few, it will attack.  I used it on branchline Athearn, and Proto ith no problems.
Dennis Williams/Owner
www.resinbuilders4u.com

--- On Mon, 2/28/11, Raymond Hatfield <iron_horse819@yahoo.com> wrote:


From: Raymond Hatfield <iron_horse819@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] paint sripping
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, February 28, 2011, 7:39 AM


 



Hello Don,

I'm new to the list, but this is a subject I can comment on - believe it or not,
automotive brake fluid is a safe and effective paint stripper for models (and
autos as well!)  I have a 1:350 scale model of the RMS Titanic I had to totally
strip and repaint, and this worked wonders for me.  Use a shallow dish of an
appropriate size to soak it in, and use an old toothbrush to scrub nooks and
crannies

Raymond L. Hatfield

________________________________
From: sarbuf <djjanes@sympatico.ca>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Mon, February 28, 2011 9:09:09 AM
Subject: [STMFC] paint sripping

 
Hello Group: I was just wondering if anyone has stripped the paint, or at least
the lettering off a Roundhouse (Athearn) Phaudler wood milk car. I have a couple
of painted cars I want to redo and need to get the lettering off. I would
appreciate any suggestion.

Thanks
Don Janes
Sarnia, Ont

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: paint sripping

Raymond Hatfield <iron_horse819@...>
 

Hello Don,

I'm new to the list, but this is a subject I can comment on - believe it or not,
automotive brake fluid is a safe and effective paint stripper for models (and
autos as well!)  I have a 1:350 scale model of the RMS Titanic I had to totally
strip and repaint, and this worked wonders for me.  Use a shallow dish of an
appropriate size to soak it in, and use an old toothbrush to scrub nooks and
crannies

Raymond L. Hatfield




________________________________
From: sarbuf <djjanes@sympatico.ca>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Mon, February 28, 2011 9:09:09 AM
Subject: [STMFC] paint sripping

 
Hello Group: I was just wondering if anyone has stripped the paint, or at least
the lettering off a Roundhouse (Athearn) Phaudler wood milk car. I have a couple
of painted cars I want to redo and need to get the lettering off. I would
appreciate any suggestion.

Thanks
Don Janes
Sarnia, Ont







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Murphy ends continued

water.kresse@...
 

It was named for Peter Murphy the patent holder and later President of Standard Railway Equipment.  I believe those  records are now at Northwestern U's trans library.  Pullman-Standard even tried to copy one his designs and got caught in the courts.



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: tgregmrtn@aol.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, February 27, 2011 9:18:58 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Murphy ends continued

Heavens to Murphy...   Like that term?  <g>
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one, and a river runs through  it.
Norman Maclean  


Tony  writes:
 
 
 
 
As anyone knows who has perused Cyclopedias, the term "Murphy" is not very  
specific for anything. It was used by Standard Railway Equipment to denote
a  whole slew of roof designs, some quite different from each other, as well
as a  couple of different end designs. As far as Richard Hendrickson and I
have ever  been able to determine, the term refers back to an invention of
interlocking  metal parts which made the combination water-tight, or
approximately so. Thus  the term could be applied to any component which employed
that arrangement.  One supposes that "Murphy" refers to the inventor, rather
than to the  well-known "Murphy's Law." <g>
If someone on the list knows more, I'd  like to hear it.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley,  CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510)  540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, _thompson@signaturepress.com_
(mailto:thompson@signaturepress.com)
Publishers  of books on railroad history






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


paint sripping

sarbuf <djjanes@...>
 

Hello Group: I was just wondering if anyone has stripped the paint, or at least the lettering off a Roundhouse (Athearn) Phaudler wood milk car. I have a couple of painted cars I want to redo and need to get the lettering off. I would appreciate any suggestion.

Thanks
Don Janes
Sarnia, Ont


Duty Paid-Why Archbar Trucks Listed?

gary laakso
 

I have a copy of the Great Northern January 1, 1942 Classification and Numbering of Locomotives and Equipment. It has a section listing steam locomotives that had Duty paid on them as well as passenger, freight and work equipment. The box car listing includes notations for those cars with archbar trucks. The flatcar list includes notations for cast steel trucks. No such notations are given for the work equipment that duty had been paid upon.

Did the duties paid to get the equipment into Canada include a charge based upon the type of truck? The similar edition for 1930 does not contain either notation for the type of truck and I have not seen such a notation for archbar trucks in any other GN publication. The 18 iron ore cars in the duty paid equipment list was also a surprise.


gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
vasa0vasa@earthlink.net


Re: Tennessee Coal on the CB&Q

Bill Welch
 

No.

Bill

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Bill

Is this information qualified with dates? Coal mining is a
fungible business, and usage patterns can vary greatly over
time.

Tim O'Connor



In thumbing through Richard Prince's book on the NC&StL he notes that
coal mined around Sewanee and Bon Air, Tennessee was transported to
The Twin Cities and to Omaha. This coal was also the preferred fuel
for the CB&Q's locomotives and "consequently [the CB&Q] became an
important customer for its use on the eastern divisions of that
railroad." I guess you "Q" modelers need to stock up on Kadee's
NC&StL offset twins and build a few of their USRA style twins too.
The NC&StL handed the coal off to the "Q" at Paducah-Metropolis.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930
fgexbill@...


Frisco covered hoppers

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I have a Kadee Frisco covered hopper. Before I weather this, what sorts of
lading would it likely have carried as a Frisco car?

SGL





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