Date   

Re: aTLAS sHRUGGED

RDG2124 <RDG2124@...>
 

Easy now.  Rob maybe a youngster amongst us chronologically challenged types.  Wink!


Evan Leisey
Bennett, CO

-----Original Message-----
From: cvlk
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, Mar 7, 2011 9:45 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] aTLAS sHRUGGED

  .....the John Galt Line is/was Al Westerfield's home road.... something all STMFC guys should know!!!
Charlie Vlk

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2011 9:26 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] aTLAS sHRUGGED

Rob Manley wrote:
I tried Google earth to find the Galt Line as a possible prototype
for my steam era freight cars.
No luck. Who is John Galt?
Rob, Rob, you're flubbing the straight line. You're supposed to
say, "Who was John Galt?"

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: aTLAS sHRUGGED

Charlie Vlk
 

.....the John Galt Line is/was Al Westerfield's home road.... something all STMFC guys should know!!!
Charlie Vlk

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2011 9:26 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] aTLAS sHRUGGED



Rob Manley wrote:
> I tried Google earth to find the Galt Line as a possible prototype
> for my steam era freight cars.
> No luck. Who is John Galt?

Rob, Rob, you're flubbing the straight line. You're supposed to
say, "Who was John Galt?"

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Panel side hoppers

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@..., "cef39us" <cfrench@...> wrote:


Clark, I believe the Frisco cars had different shape panels, perhaps
for USRA cars. The top bevel on them was longer than on the Wabash
and other panel type cars. They may have been stampings from Enterprise.

Chet French
Dixon,IL

Chet,

These cars may have been rebuilt with yet another variation offered by Union Metal Products, designed to be used with 5-1/2" bulb angle stakes. The common panels projected 4" from the normal plane of the side; nominally the same amount as the original stakes. The Bulb angle stakes projected 5-1/2",and the pressed panels projected the same amount. Use of the same angle at the top of the panels (dictated by the car dumpers of the day) brought the bend line down lower on the car. The general drawing of this style in the 1940 Cyc. shows the two end most panels as the standard 4" projection, so the bend line didn't line up with the six center panels, but that's not saying any cars were actually built that way.

Dennis


Re: Panel side hoppers

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@..., water.kresse@... wrote:



The C&O converted 23 twin-bay and 1200 triple-bay rib-sided cars.   Did anyone find any cost data on the cost of these panels vs. flat panels? . . . documentation as to what monster-press they were formed on?



Al
I can't see the forming press being anything unusual; the side of each panel was about the same as the size of the panels that made up a Dreadnaught end (also made by the same company, Union Metal Products.)

As to cost, the original design side panels, those made to make use of the original (or replacement) side stakes were obviously more expensive than flat sheet, but did serve ti increase the car capacity. The later design, with the integral stakes, eliminated the cost of replacement stakes, so may have been on par with rebuilding in-kind, but also yielded a larger capacity car.

Dennis


Re: aTLAS sHRUGGED

Jim Hayes
 

I'm looking forward to the movie. The trains look good but aren't they the
wrong era to match yours?

Jim


On Mon, Mar 7, 2011 at 5:30 PM, Al and Patricia Westerfield <
westerfield@...> wrote:



The film, Atlas Shrugged Part 1 will debut April 15th. For those unaware of
the book, part 1 deals with building The John Galt Line. Its climax features
a high speed freight as the first train on the line. Google Atlas Shrugged
for the trailer and comments. Thanks to John Sanders for the info. - Al
Westerfield





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: aTLAS sHRUGGED

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Rob Manley wrote:
I tried Google earth to find the Galt Line as a possible prototype for my steam era freight cars.
No luck. Who is John Galt?
Rob, Rob, you're flubbing the straight line. You're supposed to say, "Who was John Galt?"

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: sanding sticks source?

Rob & Bev Manley
 

I use the Walgreens nail sanding boards and cut them down to thin strips with my xacto or boxcutter. If I am in a hurry I'l cut the ends to shape with my side cutting rail nippers.
Rob Manley
Midwest Mod-U-Trak
"Better modeling through personal embarrassment"

----- Original Message -----
From: soolinehistory
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2011 9:10 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: sanding sticks source?





--- In STMFC@..., "Dean" <1payne1@...> wrote:
>
> Rather than journey to my not-so-local hobby shop, I went to a large craft store looking for sanding sticks, but they didn't have any.

My idea of a useful sanding stick is a little patch of sandpaper on the angled end of a stick, useful for sanding small surfaces between rivets and other details. I agree with Ray that 3M wet-or-dry paper in the finer grits is the way to go. I typically save dead or balding artists brushes for conversion into sanding sticks, as I find the elliptical shape really handy for getting around details.

I take the round artist brush handles, clip off the metal ferule, then sand the end of the stick to a comfortable angle on a disc sander, although I suppose you could just saw it off, but the resulting surface needs to be FLAT. Cutting through the round hardwood handle at an angle yields an elliptical surface, which I attach the wet-or-dry paper to with thick CA. I tear off bits of the sand paper with my fingers, add a dot of CA, and land the stick on it, holding it tightly to a flat surface until the CA has set. I then trimm off the excess paper and glue squeeze-out by dicing down through it with a single edge razor blade, the grit again held tightly on a flat surface so the resulting edges are clean and FLAT.

Since there is no grit on the sides of the paper, you can sand right up to rivets with these, and so long as you don't tip the stick so it rides over the rivets, they will be unharmed.

I typicaly angle both ends of the tapered handle, giving me two different size pads of sandpaper. When the paper gets soft and mushy, I zip them off on the disc sander and attach new paper.

Dennis


Re: aTLAS sHRUGGED

Rob & Bev Manley
 

I tried Google earth to find the Galt Line as a possible prototype for my steam era freight cars.
No luck.
Who is John Galt?

Rob Manley
Midwest Mod-U-Trak
"Better modeling through personal embarrassment"

----- Original Message -----
From: Al and Patricia Westerfield
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2011 7:30 PM
Subject: [STMFC] aTLAS sHRUGGED



The film, Atlas Shrugged Part 1 will debut April 15th. For those unaware of the book, part 1 deals with building The John Galt Line. Its climax features a high speed freight as the first train on the line. Google Atlas Shrugged for the trailer and comments. Thanks to John Sanders for the info. - Al Westerfield


Re: sanding sticks source?

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Dean" <1payne1@...> wrote:

Rather than journey to my not-so-local hobby shop, I went to a large craft store looking for sanding sticks, but they didn't have any.
My idea of a useful sanding stick is a little patch of sandpaper on the angled end of a stick, useful for sanding small surfaces between rivets and other details. I agree with Ray that 3M wet-or-dry paper in the finer grits is the way to go. I typically save dead or balding artists brushes for conversion into sanding sticks, as I find the elliptical shape really handy for getting around details.

I take the round artist brush handles, clip off the metal ferule, then sand the end of the stick to a comfortable angle on a disc sander, although I suppose you could just saw it off, but the resulting surface needs to be FLAT. Cutting through the round hardwood handle at an angle yields an elliptical surface, which I attach the wet-or-dry paper to with thick CA. I tear off bits of the sand paper with my fingers, add a dot of CA, and land the stick on it, holding it tightly to a flat surface until the CA has set. I then trimm off the excess paper and glue squeeze-out by dicing down through it with a single edge razor blade, the grit again held tightly on a flat surface so the resulting edges are clean and FLAT.

Since there is no grit on the sides of the paper, you can sand right up to rivets with these, and so long as you don't tip the stick so it rides over the rivets, they will be unharmed.

I typicaly angle both ends of the tapered handle, giving me two different size pads of sandpaper. When the paper gets soft and mushy, I zip them off on the disc sander and attach new paper.


Dennis


Re: sanding sticks source?

RDG2124 <RDG2124@...>
 

Northwest Short Lines sells the same spring loaded handles as Woodcraft, but NWSL has two additional grits, 400 and 600.  Have found these indispensable.


Evan Leisey
Bennett, CO

-----Original Message-----
From: Rufus Cone
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, Mar 7, 2011 6:50 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Re: sanding sticks source?


  Just a suggestion -- Perhaps these 1/4" wide sanding sticks would be
of interest for detail sanding. Reviews on the site are 4.5 out of 5.

The 1/4" sanding belts - the loops are shifted to bring fresh grit into
position - could be used on an improvised setup. They have 320 grit in
addition to the grits listed below for the kit.

I have not used these. Similar items are available elsewhere.

24 Piece Standard Kit Sanding Sticks
http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2000274/1744/24-Piece-Standard-Kit-Sanding-Sticks.aspx

Sanding Stick Kits make sanding those hard-to-reach areas an easy task.
Newly designed pencil-type sticks are hexagon shaped for comfort,
feature thumb and finger supports, and hold 1/4" x 12-3/4" aluminum
oxide belts. The 6-1/4" x 1/4" sticks are made of impact resistant
plastic and have a spring tensioned back to keep the sanding belts
firmly in place or allow quick belt rotating or changing. The tapered
end can be used for intricate sanding while the flat side and rounded
end add to the versatility of the sanding sticks. 24 Piece Standard Kit
includes 4 color coded sticks and 5 belts each in 80, 120, 180, and 240
grits.

* Hexagon shaped for comfort
* Hold 1/4" x 12-3/4" aluminum oxide belts
* The 6-1/4" x 1/4" sticks are made of impact resistant plastic
* 24 Piece Standard Kit includes 4 color coded sticks and 5 belts
each in 80, 120, 180, and 240 grits
* Have a spring tensioned back to keep the sanding belts firmly in
place or allow quick belt rotating

No doubt there are other sources on the web for similar items.


Re: Panel side hoppers

David
 

--- In STMFC@..., "jaydeet2001" <jaydeet2001@...> wrote:

I've seen an in-train photo in a book
Extra South, top of p.115; on the C&O in 1951.

David Thompson


Re: Panel side hoppers

al_brown03
 

There's a photo of NKP 32108 in Kline and Culotta, "PFCF", p 153.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., "jaydeet2001" <jaydeet2001@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., Ray Breyer <rtbsvrr69@> wrote:

NKP 32000-32149 (149 cars, not 150). Rebuilt in 1936 from NKP 30750-31749 composite hoppers, originally built in 1923.

These cars were all over the railroad, but tracking down a photo of an entire car is pretty much impossible; mostly, they show up hidden behind engines in terminals. I have one murky color photo of an unidentifiable but whole car tucked in behind a B&A steam freight in 1949.
I've seen an in-train photo in a book (or magazine?) I have, but I don't remember which one. Next time I come across it, I'll try to remember to post up.

David Thompson


Re: aTLAS sHRUGGED

water.kresse@...
 

NEAT!!!

----- Original Message -----
From: "Al and Patricia Westerfield" <westerfield@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, March 7, 2011 8:30:58 PM
Subject: [STMFC] aTLAS sHRUGGED

The film, Atlas Shrugged Part 1 will debut April 15th.  For those unaware of the book, part 1 deals with building The John Galt Line.  Its climax features a high speed freight as the first train on the line.  Google Atlas Shrugged for the trailer and comments.  Thanks to John Sanders for the info. - Al Westerfield


Re: Panel side hoppers

Ray Breyer
 

--- In STMFC@... cepropst@... wrote:
Did any other railroads that owned any?

I just dug through my photo stash, and found a photo of CN 117717, which is a pre-USRA rebuilt into a panel twin.

Also not mentioned yet are the P&LE panel twins, which I suppose should fall under the NYC blanket.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


Re: SAL Hopper Question

David
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Dave Nelson" <Lake_Muskoka@...> wrote:

I picked up a drawing of SAL 38350-38649, a 70t hopper, built in 1950-51? By
Bethlehem. I don't know if it is a AAR Std design, an Alternate, or an
oddball. Anyone know?
The H-7 groups look like the AAR standard to me.

David Thompson


Re: Panel side hoppers

David
 

--- In STMFC@..., cepropst@... wrote:

Did any other railroads that owned any?
Aside from what's already been named, Missouri Pacific and Grand Trunk also had rebuilds, and EJ&E had some 70-ton side-dump hoppers built new.

David Thompson


Re: sanding sticks source?

Rufus Cone
 

Just a suggestion -- Perhaps these 1/4" wide sanding sticks would be
of interest for detail sanding. Reviews on the site are 4.5 out of 5.

The 1/4" sanding belts - the loops are shifted to bring fresh grit into
position - could be used on an improvised setup. They have 320 grit in
addition to the grits listed below for the kit.

I have not used these. Similar items are available elsewhere.

24 Piece Standard Kit Sanding Sticks
http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2000274/1744/24-Piece-Standard-Kit-Sanding-Sticks.aspx

Sanding Stick Kits make sanding those hard-to-reach areas an easy task.
Newly designed pencil-type sticks are hexagon shaped for comfort,
feature thumb and finger supports, and hold 1/4" x 12-3/4" aluminum
oxide belts. The 6-1/4" x 1/4" sticks are made of impact resistant
plastic and have a spring tensioned back to keep the sanding belts
firmly in place or allow quick belt rotating or changing. The tapered
end can be used for intricate sanding while the flat side and rounded
end add to the versatility of the sanding sticks. 24 Piece Standard Kit
includes 4 color coded sticks and 5 belts each in 80, 120, 180, and 240
grits.

* Hexagon shaped for comfort
* Hold 1/4" x 12-3/4" aluminum oxide belts
* The 6-1/4" x 1/4" sticks are made of impact resistant plastic
* 24 Piece Standard Kit includes 4 color coded sticks and 5 belts
each in 80, 120, 180, and 240 grits
* Have a spring tensioned back to keep the sanding belts firmly in
place or allow quick belt rotating

No doubt there are other sources on the web for similar items.


Re: Panel side hoppers

David
 

--- In STMFC@..., Ray Breyer <rtbsvrr69@...> wrote:

NKP 32000-32149 (149 cars, not 150). Rebuilt in 1936 from NKP 30750-31749 composite hoppers, originally built in 1923.

These cars were all over the railroad, but tracking down a photo of an entire car is pretty much impossible; mostly, they show up hidden behind engines in terminals. I have one murky color photo of an unidentifiable but whole car tucked in behind a B&A steam freight in 1949.
I've seen an in-train photo in a book (or magazine?) I have, but I don't remember which one. Next time I come across it, I'll try to remember to post up.

David Thompson


aTLAS sHRUGGED

Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

The film, Atlas Shrugged Part 1 will debut April 15th. For those unaware of the book, part 1 deals with building The John Galt Line. Its climax features a high speed freight as the first train on the line. Google Atlas Shrugged for the trailer and comments. Thanks to John Sanders for the info. - Al Westerfield


Re: sanding sticks source?

Ray Breyer
 

--- On Mon, 3/7/11, Dean <1payne1@...> wrote:
Rather than journey to my
not-so-local hobby shop, I went to a large craft store
looking for sanding sticks, but they didn't have any. 
I thought that was a possible source, dimly remembered... or
was there a suggestion to look in the cosmetics aisle of the
drug store? 
I looked and found you could order refillable sanding
sticks from Walthers, or maybe I should just get a new set
of needle files.  I think the sanding sticks are
available in finer grit, though.
I guess the question is: can you get useful sanding sticks
from the drug store, or are they basically no better than
cheap emery boards?

Dean
Hi Dean!

Step 1: go to "favorite home improvement barn". Buy 300, 600, etc grit sandpaper and spray mount.

Step 2: go to "favorite drug & sundries barn". Buy tongue depressors.

Step 3: go to "favorite man cave". Assemble. Knife required, good beer and good music also desirable.

Step 4: Enjoy!

Always helpful,
RAY

:-)

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