Date   

Re: Announcement

Dennis Williams
 

Al.
  I wish the best to you and your wife.  Happy retirement.  I will keep building your kits for  years to come. Again, we at resinbuilders4u want to thank you for your contribution to this fine hobby.
  Dennis Williams/Owner
www.resinbuilders4u.com

--- On Fri, 4/1/11, asychis@... <asychis@...> wrote:


From: asychis@... <asychis@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Announcement
To: STMFC@...
Date: Friday, April 1, 2011, 6:25 AM


 



"Westerfield Models will no longer accept orders of any kind. Unless the
business is sold we will fill all orders in house to the best of our ability.
Because of the immense number of last minute orders, those orders may not
be filled until November. - Al Westerfield"

So ends a wonderful era in model railroading. Thanks so much Al. I
stumbled on your first kits in the 1970s when a hobby shop dealer in Laramie
suggested your UP 50' automobile boxcar as a really interesting new type of
kit and haven't looked back since. It been a great ride! Thanks again.

Jerry Michels

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.

File : /Alpha Cement/AlphaCementValMap_063018_04.jpg
Uploaded by : bnpmodeler <bnchmark@...>
Description :

You can access this file at the URL:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/files/Alpha%20Cement/AlphaCementValMap_063018_04.jpg

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/groups/original/members/web/index.html
Regards,

bnpmodeler <bnchmark@...>


Alpha cement [WAS Re: Steam era freight yards, take II]

bnpmodeler
 

Tom and Group:

Tom couldn't have said it better - Alpha Cement is indeed a fascinating
place. The silos still exist, and it was used as a grain storage facility
for 35 years or more; I am not sure of its status at the present time...

Some funky little outfit in New Jersey makes a pretty neat cast resin kit of
the LNE Martins Creek Station/yard office... Hmmm...

I am posting some scans of the DL&W 1918 Valuation Map of Martins Creek and
Alpha Cement in the 'Files' section. Pending moderator approval, they should
be there for all to enjoy in short order. Caution - they are relatively
large files of about 1.5 MB each.

A request to all on the list - I am modeling Alpha Cement (did a first-round
version of a clinic at last year's Valley Forge RPM meet) and would enjoy
immensely if anyone has any photos or other information to share - Tom, your
photo of P-Burg is priceless as it is taken from a vantage point not often
seen... Thank you for sharing it!

Enjoy and Happy Modeling to all!

Jim Harr

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Jim Harr
Stella Scale Models
P.O. Box 121
High Bridge, NJ 08829-0121
908-797-0534
www.stellascalemodels.com


" On Veterans Day 1960 I took a series of three shots of the PRR
Phillipsburg facilities from across the river just south of Easton. A couple
of years ago I assembled them into a panoramic view of questionable quality
- at least, as best as I could. When taking the photos I neglected to
overlap the left and center ones:

http://www.pullmanproject.com/Phillipsburg.jpg

The line of cars at the left is no doubt bound for or just in from the Alpha
cement plant at Martin's Creek, PA, a few miles north of Easton. The PRR
crossed the Delaware to reach it, while the DL&W served it from Bangor to
the north, and the LNE came up from the south. Fascinating place.

Tom Madden"


Re: Steam era freight yards, take II

Brian Carlson
 

hmm, OK. I got to this P'burg photo through the clarks summit messages, so I am not sure how that happened. I thought it odd Clarks Summit had a river next to it :). Thanks for the clarification.
Brian Carlson.

--- On Fri, 4/1/11, James Harr <bnchmark@...> wrote:


From: James Harr <bnchmark@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Steam era freight yards, take II
To: STMFC@...
Date: Friday, April 1, 2011, 10:05 AM


 



Brian and Group:

Just to clear up some possible confusion: Mike Del Vecchio posted TWO photos
to the ErieLack list; the PRR/Bel-Del Phillipsburg view we're discussing
here, and also a view of a Lackawanna freight heading upgrade at Clarks
Summit, PA... He posted them both as "Where Are These From" quiz shots, so
the confusion is justifiable...

FYI all, the DL&W shot is almost as compelling as this one, lots of great
STMFC's behind an F7 ABB-GP-7 lashup... Verrrrrrry nice! It can be found
here:

http://lists.railfan.net/listthumb.cgi?erielack-03-30-11

Enjoy and Happy Modeling to all!

Jim Harr

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Jim Harr
Stella Scale Models
P.O. Box 121
High Bridge, NJ 08829-0121
908-797-0534
www.stellascalemodels.com

"On the EL list, Clark's Summit was mentioned. I don't know the area, so I
can't confirm, just passing it on to this list.
Brian Carlson"








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Steam era freight yards, take II

bnpmodeler
 

Brian and Group:

Just to clear up some possible confusion: Mike Del Vecchio posted TWO photos
to the ErieLack list; the PRR/Bel-Del Phillipsburg view we're discussing
here, and also a view of a Lackawanna freight heading upgrade at Clarks
Summit, PA... He posted them both as "Where Are These From" quiz shots, so
the confusion is justifiable...

FYI all, the DL&W shot is almost as compelling as this one, lots of great
STMFC's behind an F7 ABB-GP-7 lashup... Verrrrrrry nice! It can be found
here:

http://lists.railfan.net/listthumb.cgi?erielack-03-30-11

Enjoy and Happy Modeling to all!

Jim Harr

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Jim Harr
Stella Scale Models
P.O. Box 121
High Bridge, NJ 08829-0121
908-797-0534
www.stellascalemodels.com


"On the EL list, Clark's Summit was mentioned. I don't know the area, so I
can't confirm, just passing it on to this list.
Brian Carlson"


Re: Announcement

asychis@...
 

"Westerfield Models will no longer accept orders of any kind. Unless the
business is sold we will fill all orders in house to the best of our ability.
Because of the immense number of last minute orders, those orders may not
be filled until November. - Al Westerfield"

So ends a wonderful era in model railroading. Thanks so much Al. I
stumbled on your first kits in the 1970s when a hobby shop dealer in Laramie
suggested your UP 50' automobile boxcar as a really interesting new type of
kit and haven't looked back since. It been a great ride! Thanks again.

Jerry Michels


Georgia & Florida boxcars and LOs

Benjamin Scanlon
 

Hi

According to our rolling stock guru on our TT scale modelling forum the Ga & Fla had the following unusual boxcars according to the January 1953 ORER (they had a total of 305 overall, most of which were 40' 'Fowler clones' with either 3/4 inverse Dreadnought or 7/8 Murphy ends):

5002, a 40' steel underframe car - dimensionally very close to 7246-7500 and 8001-8060 series cars (the Fowler clones). Inside dimensions and cubic capacity are identical, but 1.5" shorter overall and 2" taller overall.

5004, a 36' steel underframe car, 6" taller than a 36' Fowler, but possibly is double-sheathed.


9001, 40' all-steel boxcar. Strange dimensions - 40' 7" inside length and 8' 10" inside height. Thoughts were that this car might be something home built or rebuilt ...

I'm wondering if anyone has any ideas or info as to these cars.



Also, if there are any images or a diagram of the Hercules Powder 1002 series cement hoppers from 1929-31 I'd be interested to see. Particularly the six that became AB&C 52001-52006 and then ACL 86000-86005.

It is said they look similar to the G&F LOs. However I note that Grant in 'Rails Through the Wiregrass' says G&F built its cars, and the implication is it was postwar. However, the one side shot I have seen of one of these LOs indicates that it is of pretty ancient origin; not sure I have ever seen a wagon with quite so many rivets. ;-) I guess they may have been rebuilt as they are clearly stencilled for Douglas to Valdosta, GA online feed - and not cement - service.

However AB&C/ACL had only six and the G&F listed ten - 12076-12085 - so I'm not sure they were the same wagons, unless the G&F got four other cars from somewhere else and numbered them all in the same series.

Ben


Re: Steam era freight yards, take II

John C. La Rue, Jr. <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

A flanger and a Jordan Spreader; the flanger yellow, the Jordan black. The Russell is well to the left of those two. All were more or less permanently assigned to the Phillipsburg yard.




John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL

-----Original Message-----
From: Dave Evans <devans1@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Fri, Apr 1, 2011 12:25 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Steam era freight yards, take II





--- In STMFC@..., "pullmanboss" <tcmadden@...> wrote:


On Veterans Day 1960 I took a series of three shots of the PRR Phillipsburg facilities from across the river just south of Easton. A couple of years ago I assembled them into a panoramic view of questionable quality - at least, as best as I could. When taking the photos I neglected to overlap the left and center ones:

http://www.pullmanproject.com/Phillipsburg.jpg

The line of cars at the left is no doubt bound for or just in from the Alpha cement plant at Martin's Creek, PA, a few miles north of Easton. The PRR crossed the Delaware to reach it, while the DL&W served it from Bangor to the north, and the LNE came up from the south. Fascinating place.

Tom Madden
Tom,

Thanks for the post - the white tower near the right edge of your photo was likely just behind the photographer of the photo that started this. Interesting equipment in your photo - a Russel snow plow, I think a derrick (hard to make out).

A railfan site claimed the PRR had a hump yard here - I am not convinced and can not find any indication of that anywhere.

Dave Evans









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Intermountain SP T&NO B-50-26 roof

mike brock <brockm@...>
 

Tim O'Connor says:

As everyone here should know, any box car built for a US railroad
from 1944 onwards had steel running boards (until after the era of
STMFC interest).
Weeeelll, that depends on the definition of the word "is"...uh...I mean "from". If you mean by the end of 1944, you are at least correct that it appears that box cars were built with metal running boards after 1944. However, if you mean that no wood running boards were applied DURING 1944...you are not correct. In fact, apparently the AAR recommended the use of "other than wood" on 1/1/1944 and wood running boards were applied on none other than Santa Fe on their Bx-38 on 2-1944. I mean...surely Santa Fe wouldn't lie...would they?

Hmmm. Wonder where I can steal a panel roof from? Unfortunately, Red Caboose made a B-50-23 with a wood running board but with a panel roof. So...forgetting the end and door issues...I could apply the RC roof to the IM T&NO car...it having a metal running board. Hmmm.

Mike Brock


Announcement

Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Westerfield Models will no longer accept orders of any kind. Unless the business is sold we will fill all orders in house to the best of our ability. Because of the immense number of last minute orders, those orders may not be filled until November. - Al Westerfield


Re: Steam era freight yards, take II

devansprr
 

--- In STMFC@..., "pullmanboss" <tcmadden@...> wrote:


On Veterans Day 1960 I took a series of three shots of the PRR Phillipsburg facilities from across the river just south of Easton. A couple of years ago I assembled them into a panoramic view of questionable quality - at least, as best as I could. When taking the photos I neglected to overlap the left and center ones:

http://www.pullmanproject.com/Phillipsburg.jpg

The line of cars at the left is no doubt bound for or just in from the Alpha cement plant at Martin's Creek, PA, a few miles north of Easton. The PRR crossed the Delaware to reach it, while the DL&W served it from Bangor to the north, and the LNE came up from the south. Fascinating place.

Tom Madden
Tom,

Thanks for the post - the white tower near the right edge of your photo was likely just behind the photographer of the photo that started this. Interesting equipment in your photo - a Russel snow plow, I think a derrick (hard to make out).

A railfan site claimed the PRR had a hump yard here - I am not convinced and can not find any indication of that anywhere.

Dave Evans


Re: Foreign Road Stock Cars

Douglas Harding
 

Thanks Tim, just got home and found an email from Randy asking for help. I
was able to identify his website was built using FrontPage, which as you
say, is a problem. I have contacted him offline, but I have no idea how to
correct the problem. Do you? If so contact Randy.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Steam era freight yards, take II

pullmanboss <tcmadden@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

I am amazed at the size of PRR's operation here. As a Jersey boy myself, all
I ever saw in this area seemed much in decline. But besides the LV, this is
the main conduit for PRR-L&HR traffic through the Maybrook gateway. I'd guess
that the L&HR traffic was a higher volume than LV interchange here, for PRR.

Easton-Phillipsburg would be a fascinating place for a steam era layout - PRR,
CNJ, LV, L&HR and DL&W. All of them in packed into an area of less than 10 sq
miles.
On Veterans Day 1960 I took a series of three shots of the PRR Phillipsburg facilities from across the river just south of Easton. A couple of years ago I assembled them into a panoramic view of questionable quality - at least, as best as I could. When taking the photos I neglected to overlap the left and center ones:

http://www.pullmanproject.com/Phillipsburg.jpg

The line of cars at the left is no doubt bound for or just in from the Alpha cement plant at Martin's Creek, PA, a few miles north of Easton. The PRR crossed the Delaware to reach it, while the DL&W served it from Bangor to the north, and the LNE came up from the south. Fascinating place.

Tom Madden


Re: Intermountain SP T&NO B-50-26 roof

Tim O'Connor
 

T&NO B-50-25 series 54850-55199 had wide seam doors, but
T&NO series 55200-55699 had Superior doors.

As everyone here should know, any box car built for a US railroad
from 1944 onwards had steel running boards (until after the era of
STMFC interest).

The first use of the diagonal panel roof was 1948. Since these cars
were built 1946-1947, you know that IM has made a mistake if they used
an RP roof.

Ed Hawkins noted the first use of the diagonal panel roof was on
a series of GN 10' 12 panel box cars -- just like the IM kit!

Tim O'Connor

Everything I know and every document I can access says the IM
T&NO version is wrong. Moreover, all of the Class B-50-25 cars, having
been built during and after 1946, were built with a steel running
board (Morton or Apex). Photos show that this was the case even for
the earliest cars in the class, built in July 1946. The IM cars also
need a wide-seam door, available from Southwest models, the same
distinctive door as on the B-50-24 Overnight cars.

Tony Thompson


Re: Intermountain SP T&NO B-50-26 roof

Ed Hawkins
 

On Mar 31, 2011, at 8:48 PM, WaltGCox@... wrote:

I am looking for some wide seam doors and tried to Google" Southwest
models" but the closest hit was for a 737 wrapped in a decal of a
(female)
model. Would anyone have their website or more of the company name?
Walt,
Southwest Scale Productions at http://www.southwestscale.com/
Ed Hawkins


Re: Steam era freight yards, take II

Jim Wolf
 

P'burg is correct from my track chart from 1963. It shows about the same number of yard tracks (about 12) in the foreground, and it appears that the "bowl" or class yard is behind the photographer.

Jim Wolf
Belen, NM

--- In STMFC@..., "Dave Evans" <devans1@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@> wrote:

Bruce

That was my first thought too, but the terrain seems wrong for L&NE
or LV. The lack of any tall surrounding hills plus the river, gives
me the impression of somewhere along the Susquehanna, or the Delaware
south of the Water Gap -- way south -- but I couln't think of any
yards just like this along the Delaware. Actually my very first idea
was Wilkes-Barre PA where the valley of the Susquehanna opens out.

I hope someone can identify the location!

Tim O'Connor



I doubt that any of these tracks belong to the PRR (although I could
be wrong). If the location is NJ, then it must be somewhere in the
north/west parts of Joisey, due to the hills. Location could also be
in northeast PA.

The 2 offset 2-bay hoppers in the nearest string of cars - Lehigh and
New England?

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
Guys,

You were getting warm. This is the PRR's Phillipsburg, NJ yard on the Bel-Del. The yard is on the east shore of the Delaware River, although at this location the river bank along the tracks is facing due south. The Bel-Del mainline is at the far right, intermixed with the loaded yard tracks. This was the PRR's interchange point with the Lehigh Valley (over the photographers left shoulder - I think all visible track is PRR). I am not near my books, but according to a PA railfan web site, there was a hump yard here, and the hump would be just over and behind the photographers left shoulder, with a tower just behind the photographer on the same side of the tracks. The empty yard tracks to the left center would be the bowl. Further over the photographers shoulder would be a PRR roundhouse, a smaller yard, and then the interchange with the LV.

Pictures from Penn Pilot pretty much confirm the geometry, although the 1939 Penn Pilot does not suggest quite as many yard tracks, while the 50's Penn Pilot photo shows quite a bit. Was this one of the PRR's WWII expansion projects? Locally the terrain is pretty much a flat plateau about 100-150 feet above river level, and this matches the view one gets in Google Earth.

The main line itself still exists, and based on Google Earth, the bridge across the creek in the distance looks to be unchanged. The yard and engine facilities look to be long gone.

I would love to get a hi-res image of this for, dare I say, a WWII fleet balance count... ;-)

Dave Evans


Re: Steam era freight yards, take II

Tim O'Connor
 

Dave Evans wrote

This is the PRR's Phillipsburg, NJ yard on the Bel-Del .... there was a
hump yard here, and the hump would be just over and behind the photographers
left shoulder.... Further over the photographers shoulder would be.. the
interchange with the LV.

Cool!

I am amazed at the size of PRR's operation here. As a Jersey boy myself, all
I ever saw in this area seemed much in decline. But besides the LV, this is
the main conduit for PRR-L&HR traffic through the Maybrook gateway. I'd guess
that the L&HR traffic was a higher volume than LV interchange here, for PRR.

Easton-Phillipsburg would be a fascinating place for a steam era layout - PRR,
CNJ, LV, L&HR and DL&W. All of them in packed into an area of less than 10 sq
miles.

All signs of it seem erased in Google Earth, but there was once a direct link
from the lower (south) end of the PRR that went under the LV and CNJ lines to
the DL&W line.

Tim O'


Re: Intermountain SP T&NO B-50-26 roof

Jim Hayes
 

Try Andy Carlson midcentury@...
<midcentury@...>
Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com


On Thu, Mar 31, 2011 at 6:48 PM, <WaltGCox@...> wrote:



Sorry about that last post. I had just hit the reply button when our cocker

spaniel landed in my lap causing me to hit the send button. The result is
history.

I am looking for some wide seam doors and tried to Google" Southwest
models" but the closest hit was for a 737 wrapped in a decal of a (female)
model. Would anyone have their website or more of the company name?

TIA Walt

In a message dated 3/31/2011 8:15:48 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
_thompson@... (mailto:thompson@...) writes:

The IM cars also need a wide-seam door, available from Southwest models,
the same
distinctive door as on the B-50-24 Overnight cars.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Intermountain SP T&NO B-50-26 roof

WaltGCox@...
 

Sorry about that last post. I had just hit the reply button when our cocker
spaniel landed in my lap causing me to hit the send button. The result is
history.

I am looking for some wide seam doors and tried to Google" Southwest
models" but the closest hit was for a 737 wrapped in a decal of a (female)
model. Would anyone have their website or more of the company name?

TIA Walt

In a message dated 3/31/2011 8:15:48 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
_thompson@... (mailto:thompson@...) writes:

The IM cars also need a wide-seam door, available from Southwest models,
the same
distinctive door as on the B-50-24 Overnight cars.


Re: Intermountain SP T&NO B-50-26 roof

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Paul Lyons wrote:
Mike is asking about the 26's, not the 25's. You still need a Southwest door, but not the wide seam one.
You're right. I was emphasizing that the -25s, preceding the -26s, all had steel running boards, so a -26 with wood running board is definitely bogus. My comment on the wide-seam door only applies to the 1946 -25s. The 1947 -25s and all -26s had a different door, as you say.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

98381 - 98400 of 197023