Date   

Despatch Ends

wm501jra
 

At one time Branchline offered Despatch ends for the plug door car. Does any one know how accurate and what era they would have been. Is there another source for a 1950 version for a 10-6 car? Anybody been in touch with Atlas regarding the Branchline parts?

Thanks,
Jeff Adams


Re: CB&Q tank car

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 15, 2011, at 10:41 PM, Rupert & Maureen wrote:

Gary & Brian

Thanks for the suggestions. The Burlington didn't have any
Bettendorf tank cars, but it did purchase Standard Steel cars sometime
in 1918. These cars were class TM-5, #151000-151124 (some later
231000-231124 and 230800-230924) 12,500 gallon with an outside
length of 43' 5 1/4".

I notice that there is no ladder and platform below the expansion
dome, unlike the photos I have found of the TM-5. If these were
Standard Steel cars, would the ladder and platform have been on
both sides or only one?
Rupert, you can trust Brian that the car was built by Bettendorf;
it's a dead ringer for the photo in Bettendorf's 1907 catalog.
Possibly inherited from another RR that was acquired by the CB&Q.
Definitely not a 1918 SSC car. It may not be in the Q's records of
cars in revenue service because it went to MW service at the time it
was acquired. Possibly there was no ladder and platform to the dome
on either side; many early 20th century tank cars lacked them entirely.


Richard Hendrickson


Re: TC boxcar nomenclature correction

Tim O'Connor
 

thanks Bill. that made sense, after I looked up "bulb angle" :-)

Tim O'

Some of the sections that tabs are made from are bulb angle, unequal
angle or channel. The flange (short side of the "L") is cut square while
the web or the surface we see is cut at an angle. Tabs made of channel
have two flanges cut square and the web cut at an angle between those two
square cut flanges resulting in the steps we see. Tabs made from angles
have only one square cut flange and it is up against the side sill and
very hard to see in photos. The side we see is simply cut at an angle, no
step.

I hope this makes some sort of sense, I always have trouble describing
something without using my hands....

Later,
Bill Kelly

Isn't that "step" just where the tab is bent into an "L" shape,
i.e. aren't we looking at the bottom of the "L" edge-on? If so,
maybe the "stepless" tabs were trimmed differently, so when they
were folded (bent into an L) the taper appears to be continuous.

Tim O'Connor


Re: FYI Atlas branchline Boxcar Kits

rwitt_2000
 

Jerry Albin wrote:

FYI http://www.atlasrr.com/HOFreight/hobranchlineboxcars.htm
=================

The listing appears to include most of the former Branchline Blueprint
kits as well as the Yard Master 1937 AAR boxcar.

Bob Witt


Re: What is the number series for a 1933 PRR X29 with dreadnaught ends?

Charlie Duckworth
 

Thanks for the input on the X29 boxcar numbers (car is now soaking in stripper)

Charlie Duckworth


EMD FT demo units

jerryglow2
 

http://www.bowser-trains.com/New_Products/New%2007-11-09%20FT%20Diesels/691-23415.jpg


Although I normally don't do locomotives, I recently did a set for an
S-scale customer and can offer it in any scale.


--
Jerry Glow
The Villages FL
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/decals.html


Re: CB&Q tank car

Thomas Birkett
 

Were some of these in revenue service, or all in Company Material service?
Tom
Bartlesville, OK

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Rupert & Maureen
Sent: Saturday, April 16, 2011 12:42 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: CB&Q tank car




Gary & Brian

Thanks for the suggestions. The Burlington didn't have any Bettendorf tank
cars, but it did purchase Standard Steel cars sometime
in 1918. These cars were class TM-5, #151000-151124 (some later
231000-231124 and 230800-230924) 12,500 gallon with an outside
length of 43' 5 1/4".

I notice that there is no ladder and platform below the expansion dome,
unlike the photos I have found of the TM-5. If these were
Standard Steel cars, would the ladder and platform have been on both sides
or only one?

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "gary
laakso" <vasa0vasa@...> wrote:

It appears to be a Standard Tank Car Company product due to the placement
of the straps in the center of the car inbetween
the dome and the end of the car. The tool to confirm this would be a
picture of the bolsters which do not show in this picture.
Pressed Steel Car Company made a large number of tank cars for Great
Northern in 1911, so it could be from that builder also.

gary laakso
vasa0vasa@...


----- Original Message -----
From: Rupert & Maureen
To: STMFC List
Sent: 4/14/2011 4:09:22 AM
Subject: [STMFC] CB&Q tank car



I have posted a photo showing a CB&Q tank car oiling tracks west of
Chicago to keep down the dust. The photo has been copied from
the Railway Age Gazette of September 1911.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/2022239872/pic/list

A horizontal perforated pipe has been attached to the bottom outlet of
the car to distribute the oil "which is heated by steam
from the engine", but with baffles to prevent it being sprayed on the
rail, and the flow rate is controlled by a lever attached
to the outlet valve.

Can anyone give me some clues about the car?

Thanks

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ


Re: CB&Q tank car

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

Gary & Brian

Thanks for the suggestions. The Burlington didn't have any Bettendorf tank cars, but it did purchase Standard Steel cars sometime in 1918. These cars were class TM-5, #151000-151124 (some later 231000-231124 and 230800-230924) 12,500 gallon with an outside length of 43' 5 1/4".

I notice that there is no ladder and platform below the expansion dome, unlike the photos I have found of the TM-5. If these were Standard Steel cars, would the ladder and platform have been on both sides or only one?

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "gary laakso" <vasa0vasa@...> wrote:

It appears to be a Standard Tank Car Company product due to the placement of the straps in the center of the car inbetween the dome and the end of the car. The tool to confirm this would be a picture of the bolsters which do not show in this picture. Pressed Steel Car Company made a large number of tank cars for Great Northern in 1911, so it could be from that builder also.

gary laakso
vasa0vasa@...


----- Original Message -----
From: Rupert & Maureen
To: STMFC List
Sent: 4/14/2011 4:09:22 AM
Subject: [STMFC] CB&Q tank car



I have posted a photo showing a CB&Q tank car oiling tracks west of Chicago to keep down the dust. The photo has been copied from the Railway Age Gazette of September 1911.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/2022239872/pic/list

A horizontal perforated pipe has been attached to the bottom outlet of the car to distribute the oil "which is heated by steam from the engine", but with baffles to prevent it being sprayed on the rail, and the flow rate is controlled by a lever attached to the outlet valve.

Can anyone give me some clues about the car?

Thanks

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ


National Type B/B-1 (was Re: Kadee Trucks)

brianleppert@att.net
 

Every car in the photos have National B-1 trucks, except I can't say for sure of #9427--the photo isn't that good.

Thanks, Al.

Again, the feature I look for is that funny bolster end. If the bottom is parallel to the top, it's a B-1. If the bottom angles up to the top, then a Type B. The Type B shows a lot more of the spring.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "al_brown03" <abrown@...> wrote:
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "brianleppert@" <brianleppert@> wrote:

MONON 9383, 40' single door box (1937 AAR)---? never seen a photo
Mont Switzer states (MM 12/91 p 58) that CIL 9150-9499 had National Type B-1 trucks. Some published photos:

CIL 9294 and 9157: MRG 9-10/84 p 11
CIL 9179: MM 12/91 p 60
CIL 9271: MM 12/95 p 41
CIL 9427: MM 9/01 p 53
CIL 9225 and 9283: MM 11/05 p 59

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


National Type B/B-1 (was Re: Kadee Trucks)

al_brown03
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "brianleppert@..." <brianleppert@...> wrote:




I've added truck types below.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV
< snip>

MONON 9383, 40' single door box (1937 AAR)---? never seen a photo
Mont Switzer states (MM 12/91 p 58) that CIL 9150-9499 had National Type B-1 trucks. Some published photos:

CIL 9294 and 9157: MRG 9-10/84 p 11
CIL 9179: MM 12/91 p 60
CIL 9271: MM 12/95 p 41
CIL 9427: MM 9/01 p 53
CIL 9225 and 9283: MM 11/05 p 59

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Kadee Trucks and New Atlas Wheelsets

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

David,
You are talking about the situation I had in mind. Not holding cars on an intentional grade but rather someplace where we didn't get the track quite right.

Using the bristle to spot a car accurately is a good idea. Hadn't even considered that possibility. Thanks for a good idea.

Gene Green


You don't need to raise & lower the nylon line, they'll bend well enough.
I've taken some light test fishing line (the only reason I've been in a
sporting goods store for years) and put a small bit into a tie, just taller
than axle height. One will hold a couple of cars nicely, although these
are not steep grades. They're also really hard to see, so they're
definitely not intrusive.

The main place I have them is at a freight house, so I have them set at the
right place for each door.


--
david d zuhn Saint Paul Bridge & Terminal Ry.
zoo @ stpaulterminal.org


Re: Kadee Trucks and New Atlas Wheelsets

david zuhn
 


I know about putting a twin-coil switch machine under the track to raise
and lower a nylon hairbrush bristle to keep a car in place. Are there other
methods?
You don't need to raise & lower the nylon line, they'll bend well enough.
I've taken some light test fishing line (the only reason I've been in a
sporting goods store for years) and put a small bit into a tie, just taller
than axle height. One will hold a couple of cars nicely, although these
are not steep grades. They're also really hard to see, so they're
definitely not intrusive.

The main place I have them is at a freight house, so I have them set at the
right place for each door.


--
david d zuhn Saint Paul Bridge & Terminal Ry.
zoo @ stpaulterminal.org


National Type B/B-1 (was Re: Kadee Trucks)

brianleppert@att.net
 

I've added truck types below.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, cobrapsl@... wrote:


Tim,
Which are they--B, or B-1?
Paul Lyons

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Add:

GN 15400, 40' double door box (postwar AAR)---Type B
FW&D 8346, 40' single door box (1940 AAR)---B-1
FW&D 8427, 40' single door box (1940 AAR) B-1
MONON 9383, 40' single door box (1937 AAR)---? never seen a photo
GTW 591399, 50' double door box, end doors (1940 AAR)---Type B
CB&Q 21000-21299, 50' single door box (1940 AAR) Type B
CB&Q 48500-48599, 50' double door box, end doors (1940 AAR)---Type B
ERIE 95000-95099, 40' double door box (1940 AAR)---B-1


Re: CB&Q tank car

brianleppert@att.net
 

Definitely built by Bettendorf Axle Company. It matches illustrations of similar cars in my 1907 Bettendorf catalog.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "gary laakso" <vasa0vasa@...> wrote:

It appears to be a Standard Tank Car Company product due to the placement of the straps in the center of the car inbetween the dome and the end of the car. The tool to confirm this would be a picture of the bolsters which do not show in this picture. Pressed Steel Car Company made a large number of tank cars for Great Northern in 1911, so it could be from that builder also.

gary laakso
vasa0vasa@...


----- Original Message -----
From: Rupert & Maureen
To: STMFC List
Sent: 4/14/2011 4:09:22 AM
Subject: [STMFC] CB&Q tank car



I have posted a photo showing a CB&Q tank car oiling tracks west of Chicago to keep down the dust. The photo has been copied from the Railway Age Gazette of September 1911.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/2022239872/pic/list

A horizontal perforated pipe has been attached to the bottom outlet of the car to distribute the oil "which is heated by steam from the engine", but with baffles to prevent it being sprayed on the rail, and the flow rate is controlled by a lever attached to the outlet valve.

Can anyone give me some clues about the car?

Thanks

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: CB&Q tank car

gary laakso
 

It appears to be a Standard Tank Car Company product due to the placement of the straps in the center of the car inbetween the dome and the end of the car. The tool to confirm this would be a picture of the bolsters which do not show in this picture. Pressed Steel Car Company made a large number of tank cars for Great Northern in 1911, so it could be from that builder also.

gary laakso
vasa0vasa@earthlink.net

----- Original Message -----
From: Rupert & Maureen
To: STMFC List
Sent: 4/14/2011 4:09:22 AM
Subject: [STMFC] CB&Q tank car



I have posted a photo showing a CB&Q tank car oiling tracks west of Chicago to keep down the dust. The photo has been copied from the Railway Age Gazette of September 1911.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/2022239872/pic/list

A horizontal perforated pipe has been attached to the bottom outlet of the car to distribute the oil "which is heated by steam from the engine", but with baffles to prevent it being sprayed on the rail, and the flow rate is controlled by a lever attached to the outlet valve.

Can anyone give me some clues about the car?

Thanks

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Kadee Trucks

docdenny34 <danspach@...>
 

Tim, I cannot disagree with your own results and/nor your reasoning. However, perhaps i did not make clear that in my own experience over the years, the "theoretical" (your term) results recorded from the rolltester seem to broadly track observable real-time rollability under the car on the layout. This is not always, of course, but it is enough for me to use the recorded data as a reliable guide without the routine of additionally testing the results under a car.

The one oz. test load is not ideal, but most of the time it seems to be enough; and of course, it is simply additive to whatever the weight of the truck cum wheels might be- relatively little fora Tahoe or Accurail truck, relatively more for Kadee with their metal-bearing plastic frames. I don't routinely weight my cars to exact NMRA standards, but when challenged, the cars actually weigh out pretty close- mostl very slightly on the light side. No problems.

As for the Lindberg trucks, placing weight on them did, and does make them roll by themselves even on a flat surface. However, they also will -by themselves- roll uphill after replacement by Reboxx wheels- with or without weight.

Denny

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Denny, a 1 oz load is about 1/2 the typical load of a freight
car. There are also rolling dynamics involved. And under load,
the shape of the bearing and journal, and the materials, makes
a big difference. Kato ASF A-3 trucks for example roll incredibly
well without a load, but as the load increases, the performance
is affected -- it's almost a straight-line correlation.

I roll test every car that I put together, or make ready for
operation. It takes a little time, maybe 20 minutes, to identify
the proper truck design for that model and then find a model truck
and wheelset combination that gives good results. It's makes no
difference to me how well a truck rolls "in theory".

For example, remember those old Lindbergh trucks? Those things
rolled like crazy, we thought they were miraculous in the 1960's.
Oh wait, until you put a car on them. Then your results may vary.

Tim O'Connor




Tim O'C inquires about the effect of weight on truck rolling test data.

I do not routinely test truck rollability with/without weights, although I do so on occasion. My reason for not doing so is that I use the test data to conveniently guide my choices of wheel sets going forward (not excluding leaving OEM alone!) without having to parse out with testing anew with each install the usual small inherent differences resulting from both variable weighting, but also rollability differences caused by the common variability between nominally-identical trucks. Sometimes the weight improves rollability, occasionally in dramatic fashion; while at other times, the same weight can all but stop a truck dead in its tracks. Most of the time, in real time, it makes no difference.

As to the new Kadee trucks, I did indeed test the Barber S3 with and without weight. The weight (a 1-oz. lead block balanced on the truck bolster) caused the rollability to improve, but ever so slightly- remaining still in the midst of the Acceptable/Good field. This was why it was not mentioned.

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


Re: Kadee Trucks and New Atlas Wheelsets

Tim O'Connor
 

Sheesh, Gene, just set the handbrake!

Aren't free rolling trucks somewhat of a two-edged sword?

Wouldn't any track where a freight car might be parked have to be perfectly level in order to avoid having the car roll away?

I know about putting a twin-coil switch machine under the track to raise and lower a nylon hairbrush bristle to keep a car in place. Are there other methods?

Gene Green


Re: Kadee Trucks and New Atlas Wheelsets

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

Aren't free rolling trucks somewhat of a two-edged sword?

Wouldn't any track where a freight car might be parked have to be perfectly level in order to avoid having the car roll away?

I know about putting a twin-coil switch machine under the track to raise and lower a nylon hairbrush bristle to keep a car in place. Are there other methods?

Gene Green


Re: Necessary Freight cars

Andy Harman
 

On Fri, 15 Apr 2011 12:28:04 -0700 (PDT), Benjamin Hom wrote

At least they still can be used as fodder for the Sunshine Alternate Standard
mini-kit!
Is this by any chance still available?

Andy


Re: Kadee Trucks and New Atlas Wheelsets

Andy Harman
 

On Fri, 15 Apr 2011 14:17:47 -0400, Ian Cranstone wrote

Front Range also played with rotating bearing trucks back in the 1980s (as I
recall). They were included with their centre-beam flatcars, and rolled like
bricks.
Somehow that seems very appropriate.

Andy

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