Date   

Digital Calipers

JP Barger
 

Caliper and would-be caliper users,

A half dozen years ago, when we were nearer to starting the use of digital
calipers after using dial versions for several years, I was enamored enough
to buy a couple of them. They were overproduced for a couple of years, at
least, and consequently in that period, it was a buyers' market. Digitals
could be purchased in 4, 6 and 8 inch versions under $30. All were
originally battery-powered.

It wasn't long until I was greatly annoyed when it seemed that the battery
was always dead when I wanted to use it. Keeping good batteries on hand
isn't easy either because new ones lose power just as ones in use, except
maybe slower. Like a lot of you, I have lots of other things to do, travels
to make, etc., and consequently, can't be at my workbench consistently. So,
it seemed like often, when I got back to my modelling affairs, I found
myself confronted with a battery problem.

One day, I came across a solar powered digital caliper!! For sale!! All in
one unit, no wires, no separate power unit, all nicely integrated, no
different in appearance or application. So, I grabbed it. I probably said
'Whoopee' at that moment.

Since that day, my mood has been lighter. (Or, it could be old age getting
closer!) The caliper has worked perfectly ever since it and I entered into
matrimony. The solar cell works just as well in the winter as when the sun
is high. It even works in a room with only an incandescent bulb for light,
or fluorescent.

The caliper I have is a Mitutoyo CD-S8"-CP, serial no. 0000422, Code number
500-492, 8" length.

Soon after I began to use the self-powered caliper, I enjoyed it so much
that I wanted another to use at work. Do you think I could find one? It
looked to me like Mitutoyo stopped making them. That may not be the truth,
but something got in the way. We who use spare time to model could use a lot
of these 'Magic Bunny plus' calipers. Time--the thing most of have so little
of--would be saved, not just in changing batteries, but in chasing after
them. Spirits would lighten; discourse on this list might even shift more
towards the humorous side; darkness would disappear to be replaced by sunny
comments. Textbooks on personality will describe that watershed moment in
2011 when modellers, at least, drastically changed from outright moodiness
to behavioral role models.

I, myself, may be somewhat delayed in joining the new sunnier modelling
group because I still haven't found my second solar-powered digital caliper.
Can any of you tool demons help? What happened to Mitutoyo? Where am I not
looking to find my new little machine, which will put me in CALIPER BIGAMY?

The would-be sunnier modeller,

JP


Re: HPAX

naptownprr
 

Thanks, that's what others have told me.

Quoting Douglas Harding <doug.harding@...>:

Jim, if you are looking for the 37' car used by Hunter, the Branchline car
is not the answer. Instead look for the Red Caboose Mather car.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org







Re: Union RR gondola from F&C (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

CJ;

I do not know how A&S acquired these gons, and I also cannot find any photos
of them, but I did see a gon that looked exactly like these cars on the A&S a
long time ago, and then more recently, and indeed, my 1963 ORER has 20 cars
in series 340 to 359, and lists the very same dimensions - 50'6" IL, 70-ton,
3' IH, 1439 cu ft.

It is also very hard to get data on the dynamics of how all these RRs shared,
leased and/or sold cars to one another. Assembling data from numerous ORERs
might be one way, but I have also been mining data provided by others that
own original RR records, to get an idea on what cars the A&S, B&LE (where
they lasted a very long time), EJ&E (who had none that I can find), Lake
Terminal (who had 200 cars in the early 50's, and they DID travel),
McKeesport Connecting (100 cars that also traveled far and wide), and Union
RR (1000 cars, dropping to 609 by 1952, with some going to other roads),
swapped, leased and sold their cars.

It took a lot of persuasion to get this car done, but it was really needed.
BTW, the one-piece body kit is coming, with interior detail.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of cj
riley
Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2011 8:12 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Union RR gondola from F&C (UNCLASSIFIED)



Elden, Wasn't Aliquippa Southern J&L's railroad.

CJ

--- On Tue, 4/26/11, Gatwood, Elden SAW <elden.j.gatwood@...
<mailto:elden.j.gatwood%40usace.army.mil> > wrote:
, Aliquippa Southern, and McKeesport

Connecting RR, all USS-owned at time of purchase. They were seen all over

the place, often carrying loads of structural steel or particularly for the

McK Con, loads of tube.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Re: HPAX

Douglas Harding
 

Jim, if you are looking for the 37' car used by Hunter, the Branchline car
is not the answer. Instead look for the Red Caboose Mather car.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Mather Paint was HPAX

thomas christensen
 

Group,

 See page 71 of the Refrigerator Car Color Guide by Gene Green. There is a photo
of RPRX 645 with aluminum/silver ends and roof dated 5/1954. The repack and
reweight data is for 4/54. On the same page is RPRX 635 which appears to have
orange sides, ends, and roof. It has dates of 12/53. Also on page 68 is MORX
9904 in all yellow with dates of 4/56.

Tom Christensen



________________________________
From: Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wed, April 27, 2011 2:35:45 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] HPAX

 
On Apr 27, 2011, at 10:54 AM, Hunter, James R. wrote:

 However, I remain skeptical about the aluminum-painted ends. They would be
extremely unusual for a steam-era reefer, so I'd like to see an end photo. I
 don't want to take a kit maker's word for it that the ends and roof
were aluminum.

Jim, there is photographic evidence that Mather painted at least some
refrigerator car roofs aluminum briefly in the late 1930s, as did
several other reefer operators (e.g., Fruit Growers Express).
However, that practice was dropped during World War II and never
revived. Mather apparently found, as others did, that once the
aluminum roofs got dirty - which they did very rapidly in those days
- their heat reflectivity was so reduced that it wasn't worth the
cost of the aluminum paint. From the early '40s on, Mather reefers
had mineral red roofs. As for the ends, there is zero photographic
evidence that Mather ever painted them aluminum; it appears that they
were always mineral red. One other note on color; J.P. describes the
Megow sides as orange, but in fact. on the prototype cars, they were
what model RR paint manufacturers term reefer yellow, a rich yellow
with perhaps some slight overtones of orange, but definitely yellow,
not orange (and definitely more yellow than the orangey color used on
PFE and SFRD cars). Lettering was black on all Mather cars and AFAIK
the only cars that got color logos were the Rath cars in the 1950s.
Hunter, Hy-Grade, Morrell, Agar, and other reefers leased from Mather
did not have logos, only the lessee's name in black.

With regard to decals, there may be a Mather reefer decal set in the
works. If it materializes, I'm sure it will be announced on this
list, so watch this space. As for modeling the 42' Mather reefers,
Sunshine issued resin kits early in its history for those cars with
both composite and steel ends and lettering for several different
owners. They were in the #15 series. They may turn up from time on
time on the second hand market.

Richard Hendrickson






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


PRR G24 brake equipment locations

Eric Mumper
 

Group,

I am currently working on a Sunshine PRR G24 resheathed with steel sides for a 1954 era layout which means it would have AB brakes. Looking at the pictures in TKM and the Sunshine PDS it looks like the reservoir should be under the center panel. The typical USRA gon would also have the K brake cylinder in the center panel which when converted to AB brakes would probably be put in the same location. What I cannot see is where the AB valve should be located. I cannot locate my copy of Mainline Modeler from 2/2001 for Mont's article on kitbashing the rebuild.

If anybody has a brake diagram or knows where the AB valve should be, please let me know. Thanks. (The Sunshine kit has locators for the brake components, but the reservoir is not in the right location and these have been known to be suspect.)

Eric Mumper


Re: The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2011

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Rich Orr wrote:
If you open the pdf file, you will find the spring edition is number 76. The link on the website has the wrong number.
Thank you, Rich. I know it's that way because I downloaded it before I noticed the typo on the web page. Presumably it'll be corrected one day <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2011

SUVCWORR@...
 

Tony,

If you open the pdf file, you will find the spring edition is number 76. The link on the website has the wrong number.

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wed, Apr 27, 2011 11:49 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2011


Ben Hom wrote:

The Spring 2011 issue of The Keystone Modeler is online at
http://www.prrths.com/newprr_files/newPRRKeystoneModeler.htm


Is there a reason that the website shows both the Autumn 2010

and Spring 2011 issues as No. 75?



Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...

Publishers of books on railroad history







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Re: HPAX

naptownprr
 

Richard,

Thank you for the additional information. I guess I've never seen the photos of cars with alumnium roofs, but in my time period such roofs would have been repainted. I hope some other less expensive possibility shows up for modeling those reefers, because Sunshine on the secondary market would likely be very expensive. I wonder if the Branchline reefers would work for the 37' cars.

I appreciate your helping me understand much more about something that caught my interest just because of my last name.

Jim

Quoting Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>:

On Apr 27, 2011, at 10:54 AM, Hunter, James R. wrote:

Very interesting and long story, JP. My research has led me to
believe
that the Hunter Packing plant was located in East St. Louis, just as
Richard told me. I have a copy of that B/W photo from Bob's Photos
dated 1942; perhaps it should be dated later. However, I remain
skeptical about the aluminum-painted ends. They would be extremely
unusual for a steam-era reefer, so I'd like to see an end photo. I
don't want to take a kit maker's word for it that the ends and roof
were aluminum.
Jim, there is photographic evidence that Mather painted at least some
refrigerator car roofs aluminum briefly in the late 1930s, as did
several other reefer operators (e.g., Fruit Growers Express).
However, that practice was dropped during World War II and never
revived. Mather apparently found, as others did, that once the
aluminum roofs got dirty - which they did very rapidly in those days
- their heat reflectivity was so reduced that it wasn't worth the
cost of the aluminum paint. From the early '40s on, Mather reefers
had mineral red roofs. As for the ends, there is zero photographic
evidence that Mather ever painted them aluminum; it appears that they
were always mineral red. One other note on color; J.P. describes the
Megow sides as orange, but in fact. on the prototype cars, they were
what model RR paint manufacturers term reefer yellow, a rich yellow
with perhaps some slight overtones of orange, but definitely yellow,
not orange (and definitely more yellow than the orangey color used on
PFE and SFRD cars). Lettering was black on all Mather cars and AFAIK
the only cars that got color logos were the Rath cars in the 1950s.
Hunter, Hy-Grade, Morrell, Agar, and other reefers leased from Mather
did not have logos, only the lessee's name in black.

With regard to decals, there may be a Mather reefer decal set in the
works. If it materializes, I'm sure it will be announced on this
list, so watch this space. As for modeling the 42' Mather reefers,
Sunshine issued resin kits early in its history for those cars with
both composite and steel ends and lettering for several different
owners. They were in the #15 series. They may turn up from time on
time on the second hand market.

Richard Hendrickson





Re: The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2011 (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Tony;

That was a very courteous response, and sorry for joking a little.

As annoying as some PRR fans can be (and we are), the folks at TKM are doing
a superb job, and the latest issue is really good reading.

Take care,

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Anthony Thompson
Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2011 1:41 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2011



Gatwood, Elden wrote:
Does this mean (gasp), that Tony reads TKM!?!?
Of course. It's a superb production. I've been impressed with the quality of
both content and production, and the breadth of material, from the beginning.
It's a high standard for other societies to try and emulate.

For those with little humor...I am kidding. EVERYONE is a Pennsy fan.
Well, no, Elden, I can't count myself really a FAN of the Pennsy, but it's an
endlessly interesting railroad, and certainly it remains true, as was said
many years ago, anyone who's serious about freight cars IS a Pennsy modeler.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
<mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.com>
Publishers of books on railroad history





Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Re: HPAX

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 27, 2011, at 10:54 AM, Hunter, James R. wrote:

Very interesting and long story, JP. My research has led me to
believe
that the Hunter Packing plant was located in East St. Louis, just as
Richard told me. I have a copy of that B/W photo from Bob's Photos
dated 1942; perhaps it should be dated later. However, I remain
skeptical about the aluminum-painted ends. They would be extremely
unusual for a steam-era reefer, so I'd like to see an end photo. I
don't want to take a kit maker's word for it that the ends and roof
were aluminum.
Jim, there is photographic evidence that Mather painted at least some
refrigerator car roofs aluminum briefly in the late 1930s, as did
several other reefer operators (e.g., Fruit Growers Express).
However, that practice was dropped during World War II and never
revived. Mather apparently found, as others did, that once the
aluminum roofs got dirty - which they did very rapidly in those days
- their heat reflectivity was so reduced that it wasn't worth the
cost of the aluminum paint. From the early '40s on, Mather reefers
had mineral red roofs. As for the ends, there is zero photographic
evidence that Mather ever painted them aluminum; it appears that they
were always mineral red. One other note on color; J.P. describes the
Megow sides as orange, but in fact. on the prototype cars, they were
what model RR paint manufacturers term reefer yellow, a rich yellow
with perhaps some slight overtones of orange, but definitely yellow,
not orange (and definitely more yellow than the orangey color used on
PFE and SFRD cars). Lettering was black on all Mather cars and AFAIK
the only cars that got color logos were the Rath cars in the 1950s.
Hunter, Hy-Grade, Morrell, Agar, and other reefers leased from Mather
did not have logos, only the lessee's name in black.

With regard to decals, there may be a Mather reefer decal set in the
works. If it materializes, I'm sure it will be announced on this
list, so watch this space. As for modeling the 42' Mather reefers,
Sunshine issued resin kits early in its history for those cars with
both composite and steel ends and lettering for several different
owners. They were in the #15 series. They may turn up from time on
time on the second hand market.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: HPAX

naptownprr
 

Very interesting and long story, JP. My research has led me to believe that the Hunter Packing plant was located in East St. Louis, just as Richard told me. I have a copy of that B/W photo from Bob's Photos dated 1942; perhaps it should be dated later. However, I remain skeptical about the aluminum-painted ends. They would be extremely unusual for a steam-era reefer, so I'd like to see an end photo. I don't want to take a kit maker's word for it that the ends and roof were aluminum.

I also want to know what any of the guys out there are going to use for their 42' wood reefers.

Jim

Quoting JP Barger <bargerjp@...>:

Hello again so soon on the same subject, HPAX (Hunter Packing). While the
email I wrote yesterday may have been a bit long for those people with
limited time (or patience) to absorb, there's more.

To begin, Megow, proprietor F. W. Megow, didn't get involved in the HO model
train car kit business until 1939.

Its first 20 kits, numbers Q1-Q20 of 1939, all refrigerator cars, were all
nominally around 40' in length, all cars of the late 1930's. The kits
featured a 2 piece solid internal block, but with 2 different woods! The
bottom half was pine; the top half balsa. The idea was apparently to lower
the center of gravity of the cars. But the design didn't work well in
practice. First, the wood wasn't cut with enough precision to allow the two
pieces to be glued together to produce smooth and square surfaces. Moreover
not many modellers had enough experience to deal with this problem, nor
perhaps high enough standards to want completely plane sides. Also, there
were few modellers who could glue the two pieces perfectly square with each
other. All we had for glue was powdered casein: it wasn't up to the job. It
was literally impossible to get a desirable result, anyhow, because almost
all of the top and bottom blocks were sawed to slightly different widths.
But suppose that some smart modeller of 1939 knew enough to sand the sides
of the glued pair of blocks carefully to create 2 plane sides parallel to
each other. By the way, there weren't any sandpapers in 1939 of optimum grit
to do this task. I'm leading you down the garden path, because even if you
made a perfect rectangular solid on day one, it wouldn't stay that way over
time. Mother Nature always gets in the act. In this case, with different
coefficients of expansion especially in the direction 90 degrees to the wood
grain, one piece of wood would get narrower in the winter and wider in the
summer, relative to the other. Two separate coefficients are involved: both
temperature and moisture (humidity)are in play. Thus, without exception, all
of the Megow refrigerator kits put together according to the Megow
instructions, even to this day, have a noticeable ridge or groove running
horizontally in the middle of the card sides, about where you would see the
upset steel ridge, which appears on the sides of steel cars of the 40's &
50's.Think the Walthers 40' refrigerator car model.A horizontal ridge in the
middle of a wood-sided car?

When I first met the Megow refrigerator car models, I was just 12 years old.
The kit boxes were black, end opening, flimsy; the kits cost just 25 cents
apiece. The black ink on the boxes was reverse printed to allow the
unprinted card surface to represent the box lettering. It's tough today to
find these kits in decent original boxes. Once in a great while, you see one
going by. If your principal interest is accurate modelling, these kits are
way too crude for you. But if you have any interest in collecting early HO
cars, these are part of the Adam and Eve beginnings of HO freight car model
development.

To answer more questions asked on this site, Jeff Sankus wanted to know
about the color of the lettering on the Hunter cars. If Megow's models are
right, the prototype sides had black letters and numbers exclusively on
orange sides. That's the color of all the side lettering on all 20 different
Megow refrigerator cars, except for the UP shield on the PFE model. The ends
of the Megow models were crude, not prepainted, and therefore had no car
numbers. Not much help there. I don't have any photographs showing end views
of the Hunter cars. I would assume that since the ends were painted
aluminum, at least in the thirties, they had 3 inch black reporting marks
with periods after the upper case letters. These cars lasted into the
fifties, so there's good reason to suspect that in a later repainted version
they changed to a freight car red roof and ends, with the end lettering
switching to white. Perhaps the prototype cars went all the way to where
Mather took out the periods, as PFE and others did. The 1942? photos don't
contradict the idea of orange sides with black side lettering.

I suspect I may not be correct about the Mather/PPCX cars later becoming the
42' HPAX cars , because today I looked in my Jul '41 ORER to find the same
cars still leased to PPCX. Who can sort out the HPAX 42' cars? I find them
very early and also in the fifties. Different cars, probably. Were they all
Mather leased, and did the steel framing show on the bottom of the sides on
these cars also?

Another question Jeff Sankus asked: I, like Richard H. don't know of any
decals for Hunter cars. One of our more enterprising decal makers might be
interested in filling this void. I'd like at least half a dozen sets.

One more comment: I usually reread my memos to check them for typos and to
try to determine if the readers have a decent chance to understand some of
the arcane things I write. In this case, the checking came one morning later
because I had to give up last night in favor of eating dinner. When I got
out the Bob's Photo Hunter 1056 & 1065 prints again this morning, I was
startled to see that the two cars have different ends. But the real surprise
was to see that on 1065, the ends had been modernized with improved
dreadnought steel ends, two piece 3/3 jobs. Thus the 1942 picture date I
have been mentioning is a fiction. Clearly, the picture has to be later than
1945. The amount of weathering on the 1065 suggests 1946, or later. Further,
the ends seem to be a light color, suggesting that the original aluminum
color was again used after the rebuilding of the ends. I can't accurately
determine the rework date, but I might be seeing a 5 in it.

The 1056 car seems to have retained its wood ends. Shadows notwithstanding,
the ends seem also to have been repainted to freight car red, or perhaps
black. It seems to have a 1942 rework date.

I have a question: Where was Hunter Packing, and also Peyton Packing?

Please keep us up to date if you know of, or can supply, decals for Hunter,
or have end photos of these attractive cars.

Thanks, guys,

JP


Re: HPAX

Jeff Sankus
 

All;
Hunter Packing Co. was located in St.Louis, Ill. This company closed it's
doors in 1983.
Jeff Sankus

On Wed, Apr 27, 2011 at 11:45 AM, JP Barger <bargerjp@...> wrote:



Hello again so soon on the same subject, HPAX (Hunter Packing). While the
email I wrote yesterday may have been a bit long for those people with
limited time (or patience) to absorb, there's more.

To begin, Megow, proprietor F. W. Megow, didn't get involved in the HO
model
train car kit business until 1939.

Its first 20 kits, numbers Q1-Q20 of 1939, all refrigerator cars, were all
nominally around 40' in length, all cars of the late 1930's. The kits
featured a 2 piece solid internal block, but with 2 different woods! The
bottom half was pine; the top half balsa. The idea was apparently to lower
the center of gravity of the cars. But the design didn't work well in
practice. First, the wood wasn't cut with enough precision to allow the two
pieces to be glued together to produce smooth and square surfaces. Moreover
not many modellers had enough experience to deal with this problem, nor
perhaps high enough standards to want completely plane sides. Also, there
were few modellers who could glue the two pieces perfectly square with each
other. All we had for glue was powdered casein: it wasn't up to the job. It
was literally impossible to get a desirable result, anyhow, because almost
all of the top and bottom blocks were sawed to slightly different widths.
But suppose that some smart modeller of 1939 knew enough to sand the sides
of the glued pair of blocks carefully to create 2 plane sides parallel to
each other. By the way, there weren't any sandpapers in 1939 of optimum
grit
to do this task. I'm leading you down the garden path, because even if you
made a perfect rectangular solid on day one, it wouldn't stay that way over
time. Mother Nature always gets in the act. In this case, with different
coefficients of expansion especially in the direction 90 degrees to the
wood
grain, one piece of wood would get narrower in the winter and wider in the
summer, relative to the other. Two separate coefficients are involved: both
temperature and moisture (humidity)are in play. Thus, without exception,
all
of the Megow refrigerator kits put together according to the Megow
instructions, even to this day, have a noticeable ridge or groove running
horizontally in the middle of the card sides, about where you would see the
upset steel ridge, which appears on the sides of steel cars of the 40's &
50's.Think the Walthers 40' refrigerator car model.A horizontal ridge in
the
middle of a wood-sided car?

When I first met the Megow refrigerator car models, I was just 12 years
old.
The kit boxes were black, end opening, flimsy; the kits cost just 25 cents
apiece. The black ink on the boxes was reverse printed to allow the
unprinted card surface to represent the box lettering. It's tough today to
find these kits in decent original boxes. Once in a great while, you see
one
going by. If your principal interest is accurate modelling, these kits are
way too crude for you. But if you have any interest in collecting early HO
cars, these are part of the Adam and Eve beginnings of HO freight car model
development.

To answer more questions asked on this site, Jeff Sankus wanted to know
about the color of the lettering on the Hunter cars. If Megow's models are
right, the prototype sides had black letters and numbers exclusively on
orange sides. That's the color of all the side lettering on all 20
different
Megow refrigerator cars, except for the UP shield on the PFE model. The
ends
of the Megow models were crude, not prepainted, and therefore had no car
numbers. Not much help there. I don't have any photographs showing end
views
of the Hunter cars. I would assume that since the ends were painted
aluminum, at least in the thirties, they had 3 inch black reporting marks
with periods after the upper case letters. These cars lasted into the
fifties, so there's good reason to suspect that in a later repainted
version
they changed to a freight car red roof and ends, with the end lettering
switching to white. Perhaps the prototype cars went all the way to where
Mather took out the periods, as PFE and others did. The 1942? photos don't
contradict the idea of orange sides with black side lettering.

I suspect I may not be correct about the Mather/PPCX cars later becoming
the
42' HPAX cars , because today I looked in my Jul '41 ORER to find the same
cars still leased to PPCX. Who can sort out the HPAX 42' cars? I find them
very early and also in the fifties. Different cars, probably. Were they all
Mather leased, and did the steel framing show on the bottom of the sides on
these cars also?

Another question Jeff Sankus asked: I, like Richard H. don't know of any
decals for Hunter cars. One of our more enterprising decal makers might be
interested in filling this void. I'd like at least half a dozen sets.

One more comment: I usually reread my memos to check them for typos and to
try to determine if the readers have a decent chance to understand some of
the arcane things I write. In this case, the checking came one morning
later
because I had to give up last night in favor of eating dinner. When I got
out the Bob's Photo Hunter 1056 & 1065 prints again this morning, I was
startled to see that the two cars have different ends. But the real
surprise
was to see that on 1065, the ends had been modernized with improved
dreadnought steel ends, two piece 3/3 jobs. Thus the 1942 picture date I
have been mentioning is a fiction. Clearly, the picture has to be later
than
1945. The amount of weathering on the 1065 suggests 1946, or later.
Further,
the ends seem to be a light color, suggesting that the original aluminum
color was again used after the rebuilding of the ends. I can't accurately
determine the rework date, but I might be seeing a 5 in it.

The 1056 car seems to have retained its wood ends. Shadows notwithstanding,
the ends seem also to have been repainted to freight car red, or perhaps
black. It seems to have a 1942 rework date.

I have a question: Where was Hunter Packing, and also Peyton Packing?

Please keep us up to date if you know of, or can supply, decals for Hunter,
or have end photos of these attractive cars.

Thanks, guys,

JP



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: P&LE and PMcK&Y Boxcars 1910 to 1975

David Sieber
 

Larry, many thanks for this post reminding me that I'd wanted to order that triple issue of "The Little Giant" and providing a link to the order form. Your presentation at Naperville was outstanding; I'd taken down the ordering info, but misplaced it. Now I have my order in.
However, I see on the PLERRHS web site that the latest edition of TLG, a double issue on the Youngstown P&LE station, etc., also has "P&LE Boxcars, Additions and Corrections" to the Boxcar issue. Any chance of posting those addenda on the STMFC and other lists, or as appropriate to maintain Society copyright, as an "additional info" link from the PLERRHS website? That would be grestly appreciated by those of us who model other regions, but purchase your super boxcar issue to more accurately model P&LE boxcars in our foreign RR interchange fleets.
Dave Sieber, Reno NV


Re: The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2011

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Gatwood, Elden wrote:
Does this mean (gasp), that Tony reads TKM!?!?
Of course. It's a superb production. I've been impressed with the quality of both content and production, and the breadth of material, from the beginning. It's a high standard for other societies to try and emulate.

For those with little humor...I am kidding. EVERYONE is a Pennsy fan.
Well, no, Elden, I can't count myself really a FAN of the Pennsy, but it's an endlessly interesting railroad, and certainly it remains true, as was said many years ago, anyone who's serious about freight cars IS a Pennsy modeler.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2011 (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Does this mean (gasp), that Tony reads TKM!?!?

Oh, the humanity!

For those with little humor...I am kidding. EVERYONE is a Pennsy fan.


Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Benjamin Hom
Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2011 12:57 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2011



Tony Thompson asked:
"Is there a reason that the website shows both the Autumn 2010 and Spring
2011 issues as No. 75?"

Typo. Spring 2011 should be No. 76.

Ben Hom




Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Re: The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2011

Benjamin Hom
 

Tony Thompson asked:
"Is there a reason that the website shows both the Autumn 2010
and Spring 2011 issues as No. 75?"

Typo.  Spring 2011 should be No. 76.


Ben Hom


Re: The Keystone Modeler, Spring 2011

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Ben Hom wrote:
The Spring 2011 issue of The Keystone Modeler is online at
http://www.prrths.com/newprr_files/newPRRKeystoneModeler.htm
Is there a reason that the website shows both the Autumn 2010 and Spring 2011 issues as No. 75?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


HPAX

JP Barger
 

Hello again so soon on the same subject, HPAX (Hunter Packing). While the
email I wrote yesterday may have been a bit long for those people with
limited time (or patience) to absorb, there's more.

To begin, Megow, proprietor F. W. Megow, didn't get involved in the HO model
train car kit business until 1939.

Its first 20 kits, numbers Q1-Q20 of 1939, all refrigerator cars, were all
nominally around 40' in length, all cars of the late 1930's. The kits
featured a 2 piece solid internal block, but with 2 different woods! The
bottom half was pine; the top half balsa. The idea was apparently to lower
the center of gravity of the cars. But the design didn't work well in
practice. First, the wood wasn't cut with enough precision to allow the two
pieces to be glued together to produce smooth and square surfaces. Moreover
not many modellers had enough experience to deal with this problem, nor
perhaps high enough standards to want completely plane sides. Also, there
were few modellers who could glue the two pieces perfectly square with each
other. All we had for glue was powdered casein: it wasn't up to the job. It
was literally impossible to get a desirable result, anyhow, because almost
all of the top and bottom blocks were sawed to slightly different widths.
But suppose that some smart modeller of 1939 knew enough to sand the sides
of the glued pair of blocks carefully to create 2 plane sides parallel to
each other. By the way, there weren't any sandpapers in 1939 of optimum grit
to do this task. I'm leading you down the garden path, because even if you
made a perfect rectangular solid on day one, it wouldn't stay that way over
time. Mother Nature always gets in the act. In this case, with different
coefficients of expansion especially in the direction 90 degrees to the wood
grain, one piece of wood would get narrower in the winter and wider in the
summer, relative to the other. Two separate coefficients are involved: both
temperature and moisture (humidity)are in play. Thus, without exception, all
of the Megow refrigerator kits put together according to the Megow
instructions, even to this day, have a noticeable ridge or groove running
horizontally in the middle of the card sides, about where you would see the
upset steel ridge, which appears on the sides of steel cars of the 40's &
50's.Think the Walthers 40' refrigerator car model.A horizontal ridge in the
middle of a wood-sided car?

When I first met the Megow refrigerator car models, I was just 12 years old.
The kit boxes were black, end opening, flimsy; the kits cost just 25 cents
apiece. The black ink on the boxes was reverse printed to allow the
unprinted card surface to represent the box lettering. It's tough today to
find these kits in decent original boxes. Once in a great while, you see one
going by. If your principal interest is accurate modelling, these kits are
way too crude for you. But if you have any interest in collecting early HO
cars, these are part of the Adam and Eve beginnings of HO freight car model
development.

To answer more questions asked on this site, Jeff Sankus wanted to know
about the color of the lettering on the Hunter cars. If Megow's models are
right, the prototype sides had black letters and numbers exclusively on
orange sides. That's the color of all the side lettering on all 20 different
Megow refrigerator cars, except for the UP shield on the PFE model. The ends
of the Megow models were crude, not prepainted, and therefore had no car
numbers. Not much help there. I don't have any photographs showing end views
of the Hunter cars. I would assume that since the ends were painted
aluminum, at least in the thirties, they had 3 inch black reporting marks
with periods after the upper case letters. These cars lasted into the
fifties, so there's good reason to suspect that in a later repainted version
they changed to a freight car red roof and ends, with the end lettering
switching to white. Perhaps the prototype cars went all the way to where
Mather took out the periods, as PFE and others did. The 1942? photos don't
contradict the idea of orange sides with black side lettering.

I suspect I may not be correct about the Mather/PPCX cars later becoming the
42' HPAX cars , because today I looked in my Jul '41 ORER to find the same
cars still leased to PPCX. Who can sort out the HPAX 42' cars? I find them
very early and also in the fifties. Different cars, probably. Were they all
Mather leased, and did the steel framing show on the bottom of the sides on
these cars also?

Another question Jeff Sankus asked: I, like Richard H. don't know of any
decals for Hunter cars. One of our more enterprising decal makers might be
interested in filling this void. I'd like at least half a dozen sets.

One more comment: I usually reread my memos to check them for typos and to
try to determine if the readers have a decent chance to understand some of
the arcane things I write. In this case, the checking came one morning later
because I had to give up last night in favor of eating dinner. When I got
out the Bob's Photo Hunter 1056 & 1065 prints again this morning, I was
startled to see that the two cars have different ends. But the real surprise
was to see that on 1065, the ends had been modernized with improved
dreadnought steel ends, two piece 3/3 jobs. Thus the 1942 picture date I
have been mentioning is a fiction. Clearly, the picture has to be later than
1945. The amount of weathering on the 1065 suggests 1946, or later. Further,
the ends seem to be a light color, suggesting that the original aluminum
color was again used after the rebuilding of the ends. I can't accurately
determine the rework date, but I might be seeing a 5 in it.

The 1056 car seems to have retained its wood ends. Shadows notwithstanding,
the ends seem also to have been repainted to freight car red, or perhaps
black. It seems to have a 1942 rework date.

I have a question: Where was Hunter Packing, and also Peyton Packing?

Please keep us up to date if you know of, or can supply, decals for Hunter,
or have end photos of these attractive cars.

Thanks, guys,

JP


Re: Kitbashing

Clark Propst
 

Tim, the RI flat is a different car.

Here's the long version of the story as told by me.

A few years back Frank asked for info on an M&StL flat car. He'd found that several railroads owned similar cars and wanted to make masters. (he wanted one of the roads flats?) At the following Naperville meet Frank told me he made the masters and sent them to Martin along with three of four others. UPS had lost the package!

Time passes - I get an email from Frank stating he'd used two RC flat cars to make the car he was after and would not be re-making the masters. SO, I followed his lead and make my version: See photo section.

Before I knew he wasn't going to re-make the masters I bought the Rock Island flat which was two shorter cars spliced together by the railroad for real. I was trilled to open the instructions and see the car I was waiting for. Turned out Martin pulled his unsual stunt and included instructions for a different model (which will never be made).

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


If I recall correctly, Frank's model was a Rock Island flat with
a big splice plate in the center.

Tim O'Connor

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