Date   

Re: K4 Decals

O Fenton Wells
 

I've bought them but not used them yet.  When I asked the same question the answers I received was that the white is a bit opaque.
Fenton

On Sat, May 30, 2020 at 3:13 PM John Riddell <riddellj@...> wrote:
Has anyone had any experience with decals by K4 Decals ?

https://k4decals.com/

John Riddell



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


K4 Decals

John Riddell
 

Has anyone had any experience with decals by K4 Decals ?

https://k4decals.com/

John Riddell


Re: SHPX 161, a two compartment tank car

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Thanks everyone for the insightful replies!
 
Claus Schlund


Re: ATSF Mineral Brown

Nelson Moyer
 

It may be apocryphal, but I was told that early CB&Q paint shop instructions for mixing mineral red (the Q called it Indian Red) was by the number of handfuls of the red pigment they mined in Wyoming per volume of base paint being mixed. Not precise by any means. At lease the pigment color was relatively consistent, having been mined at one location. The geological name of the crushed rock used escapes me.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Saturday, May 30, 2020 12:23 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] ATSF Mineral Brown

 

Roger Huber wrote:



Unless you're building a model for a builder's photo any combination and variation on a similar of close color ought to be good for our models. Paint, especially back then, had wider color range than what we have today. 

 

       Good point, Roger. I recall the retired PFE Chief Mechanical Officer telling me about the PFE representatives at manufacturing plants, who had to decide, on the basis of color drift panels in their possession, if a paint being applied by a builder was "close enough" to the color drift. They had to use their judgement because there were always variations from any paint company.

 

Tony Thompson

 

 


Re: IM Parts Sprues [was New IM Cars Arrive]

Brian Carlson
 

Guys as was posted earlier this month. No more parts. It’s plain as day on the IM site. 

https://www.intermountain-railway.com/customerservice/csparts.html

Note several undec cars are in stock per the website.  

Brian J. Carlson 

On May 30, 2020, at 1:51 PM, Fred Jansz <fred@...> wrote:

All,

I've ordered direct from IM previously and also last year, by email.
Gave them part type and amount and a couple of weeks later envelope with goodies arrived.
Small parts fee, free shipping.
Excellent service.
Fred Jansz


Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Gondola 348201

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Nice find, Bob!  Thanks for sharing.

 

A G27 in its prime, including “BAD ORDER DO NOT LOAD”!  Gotta love that!

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, May 30, 2020 1:14 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Gondola 348201

 

Photo: PRR Gondola 348201

A 1956 photo from the Temple University Libraries:

Blockedhttps://digital.library.temple.edu/digital/collection/p16002coll26/id/462/rec/2725

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Looks like a load of scrap pipe.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: IM Parts Sprues [was New IM Cars Arrive]

Fred Jansz
 

All,

I've ordered direct from IM previously and also last year, by email.
Gave them part type and amount and a couple of weeks later envelope with goodies arrived.
Small parts fee, free shipping.
Excellent service.
Fred Jansz


Re: ATSF Mineral Brown

Tony Thompson
 

Roger Huber wrote:

Unless you're building a model for a builder's photo any combination and variation on a similar of close color ought to be good for our models. Paint, especially back then, had wider color range than what we have today. 

       Good point, Roger. I recall the retired PFE Chief Mechanical Officer telling me about the PFE representatives at manufacturing plants, who had to decide, on the basis of color drift panels in their possession, if a paint being applied by a builder was "close enough" to the color drift. They had to use their judgement because there were always variations from any paint company.

Tony Thompson




Re: FGEX 11158

Walter
 

Looks like it was just reweighed.

Lenny Ohrnell


Photo: PRR Gondola 348201

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PRR Gondola 348201

A 1956 photo from the Temple University Libraries:

https://digital.library.temple.edu/digital/collection/p16002coll26/id/462/rec/2725

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Looks like a load of scrap pipe.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: LPTC 1445 & Other Poultry Cars

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: LPTC 1445 & Other Poultry Cars

A photo from the U.S. Department of Agriculture:

http://upc-online.org/industry/supersize/poultry_train.jpg

The car name appears to be "Prospect".

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Railway Bull Shippers Group

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Re: Photo: UP "See Though" Boxcar 195220

Bob Chaparro
 

Here is the Southern Pacific car, courtesy of Paul Koehler.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: SHPX 161, a two compartment tank car

Ed Hawkins
 



On May 30, 2020, at 10:33 AM, Douglas Harding <iowacentralrr@...> wrote:

Nice image of SHPX 161, a two compartment tank car.
 
I suspect this car may have been built originally as a three compartment car, based simply on the location of the two domes. Can anyone confirm (or deny) this to be the case?
 

Claus,
The photo is a curious one as the SHPX 161 tank car with 7-7-30 build date (if I have read it correctly) was not an original SHPX car built as such. The highest original number of a SHPX ICC-103 multiple-compartment tank car was 154 (roster of ACF Type 27 multiple-compartment tank cars in RP CYC Volume 10). 

Based on ACF tank car data I’ve compiled, my belief is the car was formerly one of 10 cars built in ACF lot 1152 for Crew-Levick Co. (Cities Service), CLX 2270-2279, build date 7-30, 10,000 gallon, 2-compartment tanks having unequal nominal capacities of 4,000 & 6,000 gallons.

Zooming in on the photo dome capacity stencils, the dome on the right may have “5977" stencils. I cannot make out the left dome with any degree of certainty. 

Per the 1936 tank car tariff book, all 10 CLX cars in 2270-2279 are listed. there were 3 CLX tank cars from the series with the large tank being 5977 gallons. For these 3 cars the small tank gallon capacities were 3956 (CLX 2270), 3959 (CLX 2274), and 3954 (CLX 2278), respectively. The ACF builder photo taken of CLX 2270 shows a build date of 7-7-30. 

The SHPX 161 car originally with KC brakes had been upgraded with AB brakes. This was not an ACF Type 27 tank car. The photo shows the side sills between the bolsters & end sills completely ripped away. The CLX 2270-2279 cars were what ACF denoted as “Type 28 Modified” tank cars that lacked the typical Type 27 rolled channel side sills from bolsters to end sills. The 1/43 ORER specifies 9 compartment cars in SHPX 158-166, whereas the 10 CLX 2270-2279 cars are listed in the 6/36 tariff book and 7/38 ORER. Presumably the change occurred between these dates.

Regards,
Ed Hawkins







Re: T&P boxcar door

Paul Doggett
 

Ben 

Thank you very much.

Paul Doggett     England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 30 May 2020, at 17:33, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:


Paul Doggett asked:
"Do any one know when the T&P changed their 40000 series boxcars from Youngstown doors [to] the Superior type doors...?"

The Hawkins 1937 AAR boxcar spreadsheet (which you need to download or bookmark) cites early 1950s.


Ben Hom


<image0.jpeg>
<image1.jpeg>


Re: T&P boxcar door

Benjamin Hom
 

Paul Doggett asked:
"Do any one know when the T&P changed their 40000 series boxcars from Youngstown doors [to] the Superior type doors...?"

The Hawkins 1937 AAR boxcar spreadsheet (which you need to download or bookmark) cites early 1950s.


Ben Hom



T&P boxcar door

Paul Doggett
 

Hi

Do any one know when the T&P changed their 40000 series boxcars from Youngstown doors the a Superior type doors see photos.
Many thanks
Paul Doggett. England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿


Re: Evangeline Railway

Paul Doggett
 

Jim 

Thank you I will pass this on to my Louisiana friend.
Paul Doggett 


On 30 May 2020, at 16:48, James Yaworsky <jyaworsky@...> wrote:


Here's what Wikepedia has to say, which explains why "Evangeline" is a factor in both Canada's Maritime Provinces, and in the American State  Louisiana:

The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present-day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and northern Maine — parts of an area also known as Acadia.[b] The Expulsion (1755–1764) occurred during the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War)[c] and was part of the British military campaign against New France. The British first deported Acadians to the Thirteen Colonies, and after 1758, transported additional Acadians to Britain and France. In all, of the 14,100 Acadians in the region, approximately 11,500 Acadians were deported.[8][d] A census of 1764 indicates that 2,600 Acadians remained in the colony having eluded capture.[10]

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the British captured Port Royal, the capital of the colony, in a siege. The 1713 Treaty of Utrecht, which concluded the conflict, ceded the colony to Great Britain while allowing the Acadians to keep their lands. Over the next forty-five years, however, the Acadians refused to sign an unconditional oath of allegiance to Britain. During the same period, some also participated in various military operations against the British, and maintained supply lines to the French fortresses of Louisbourg and Fort Beauséjour.[11] As a result, the British sought to eliminate any future military threat posed by the Acadians and to permanently cut the supply lines they provided to Louisbourg by removing them from the area.[12]

Without making distinctions between the Acadians who had been neutral and those who had resisted the occupation of Acadia, the British governor Charles Lawrence and the Nova Scotia Council ordered them to be expelled.[e] In the first wave of the expulsion, Acadians were deported to other British North American colonies. During the second wave, they were deported to Britain and France, and from there a significant number migrated to Spanish Louisiana, where "Acadians" eventually became "Cajuns"


Evangeline is a fictional character in a long (and famous) poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, published in 1847.  She has become a symbol of Acadian (and Cajun) society ever since.   In addition to the railway in Canada, one of VIA Rail's name trains (discontinued a while ago presumably due to budget cuts) was named after "her" as well.

 Jim Yaworsky


Re: IM Parts Sprues [was New IM Cars Arrive]

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Bill,

I was aware IM had recently stopped selling their bagged parts. What I was talking about were unpackaged sprues. These had to be ordered by telephone (or maybe email), and AFAIK were never offered from a catalog or web site. You simply told one of the nice ladies on their order desk that you wanted a dozen ladder, car end, roof or running board sprues from Kit X, and they took care of it for you. It's probably been 10 or more years since I ordered, and I still have pretty good stock of what I need, except I'm running low on PS-1 ends and had a couple more conversions of old Front Range cars I wanted to do. (That's how I did my CNW and IC riveted PS-1s.). Those are the breaks I guess.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Sat, May 30, 2020 at 9:03 AM Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:
In one of their monthly email announcements IM said they would no longer be selling parts.

Bill Welch


FGEX 11158

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi List Members,
 
I like the stenciling that sez “When empty return to Pennsylvania R R Indianapolis IND” on FGEX 11158
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Evangeline Railway

James Yaworsky
 

Here's what Wikepedia has to say, which explains why "Evangeline" is a factor in both Canada's Maritime Provinces, and in the American State  Louisiana:

The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present-day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and northern Maine — parts of an area also known as Acadia.[b] The Expulsion (1755–1764) occurred during the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War)[c] and was part of the British military campaign against New France. The British first deported Acadians to the Thirteen Colonies, and after 1758, transported additional Acadians to Britain and France. In all, of the 14,100 Acadians in the region, approximately 11,500 Acadians were deported.[8][d] A census of 1764 indicates that 2,600 Acadians remained in the colony having eluded capture.[10]

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the British captured Port Royal, the capital of the colony, in a siege. The 1713 Treaty of Utrecht, which concluded the conflict, ceded the colony to Great Britain while allowing the Acadians to keep their lands. Over the next forty-five years, however, the Acadians refused to sign an unconditional oath of allegiance to Britain. During the same period, some also participated in various military operations against the British, and maintained supply lines to the French fortresses of Louisbourg and Fort Beauséjour.[11] As a result, the British sought to eliminate any future military threat posed by the Acadians and to permanently cut the supply lines they provided to Louisbourg by removing them from the area.[12]

Without making distinctions between the Acadians who had been neutral and those who had resisted the occupation of Acadia, the British governor Charles Lawrence and the Nova Scotia Council ordered them to be expelled.[e] In the first wave of the expulsion, Acadians were deported to other British North American colonies. During the second wave, they were deported to Britain and France, and from there a significant number migrated to Spanish Louisiana, where "Acadians" eventually became "Cajuns"


Evangeline is a fictional character in a long (and famous) poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, published in 1847.  She has become a symbol of Acadian (and Cajun) society ever since.   In addition to the railway in Canada, one of VIA Rail's name trains (discontinued a while ago presumably due to budget cuts) was named after "her" as well.

 Jim Yaworsky

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