Date   

Re: RPM Collinsville

Clark Propst
 

I’ll echo Charlie’s remarks word for word.  Of course, we had to nudge Mike Scribbe about another ChicagoLand meet  ;  )) 
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: A few reefers unloading produce in Chicago

Doug Paasch
 

Scott, i think the cabover truck is not?  Looks to me like a regular truck with a van parked beyond it facing the camera.  Is that what you were looking at?  Or did I miss seeing the truck you are referring to?

    Doug Paasch


On Sun, Jul 31, 2022, 2:24 AM Scott <repairman87@...> wrote:
Really neat photo.  Like the cab over truck in the back ground.  Team tracks sure provide an opportunity for interesting cars.

Scott McDonald 


RPM Collinsville

Charlie Duckworth
 

I to managed to pick a couple kits from the F&C booth and was pleasantly surprised with the quality of the one piece bodies, bought Chad Boaz’s M-58 parts set for a 50’ B&O kit bash and Fenton showed me his wonderful built of the car.  I’d swore off buying any 50’ cars but it looks like a fun built and K4 makes the decal set. I had to visit Pierre a couple times to stock up on his detail parts.   I hadn’t  been to RPM in four years so it was good to catch up with old friends (Clark) and meet face to face with those I’d only contacted through the .io group (Bill Pardee and Fenton Wells).  The room was larger and the display tables were more spread out and I believe more tables were available. One attendee thought there was 900+ models on display.   Bill Stauss, who I worked with on the Mopac in 1977-78, found me at the MPHS table. I hadn’t see him since he’d quit and went to work for a shortline and Amtrak.  Am sure he was thinking ‘Charlie’s certainly changed the last 45 years!’  Bill written several Morning Sun books on CNW and Milwaukee passenger trains.   Steve Hile was taking photos so I assume we’ll see some images in the next week or so of the models.   
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: A few reefers unloading produce in Chicago

Robert G P
 

Thats late 40s or the earliest of the 50s id say.


On Sun, Jul 31, 2022 at 6:47 AM Robert G P via groups.io <bobgp5109=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Yes, really enjoyed this. Anyone who has any - post em! 

On Sun, Jul 31, 2022 at 5:34 AM Philip Dove <philipdove22@...> wrote:
As the others say a really interesting photo, can anyone deduce the year from liveries and truck types, please. 


Re: A few reefers unloading produce in Chicago

Robert G P
 

Yes, really enjoyed this. Anyone who has any - post em! 


On Sun, Jul 31, 2022 at 5:34 AM Philip Dove <philipdove22@...> wrote:
As the others say a really interesting photo, can anyone deduce the year from liveries and truck types, please. 


Re: A few reefers unloading produce in Chicago

Philip Dove
 

As the others say a really interesting photo, can anyone deduce the year from liveries and truck types, please. 


Re: A few reefers unloading produce in Chicago

Scott
 

Really neat photo.  Like the cab over truck in the back ground.  Team tracks sure provide an opportunity for interesting cars.

Scott McDonald 


Re: Photo: Erie Depressed Center Flat Car 99032

Bob Chaparro
 

Yes, you are right. NYC. 
Bob


Preserved cars in northwestern PA

Dave Boss
 

Harlinburg Pa has a small collection of PRR passenger cars, it used to also be a museum as well. It is at Pa RT19& PA RT108. PA RT108 exits right off I 79
DAVE


On Saturday, July 30, 2022, Robert G P <bobgp5109@...> wrote:
> Thank you guys a lot! Very handy information!
>
> -Bob
> On Sat, Jul 30, 2022 at 3:46 PM Schleigh Mike via groups.io <mike_schleigh=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>>
>> Hi Bob!
>> Titusville (Oil Creek & Titusville) has a three-compartment Standard Tank Car Shell Tanker we have mentioned in the past.  Lake Shore Railway at North East (just east of Erie on US 20) has an AC&F built X-3 as well as a number of freight and passenger cars.  Not to mention quite a collection of GE locos and a nifty fireless Heisler.  Lots of freight trains on the old NYC and NKP main lines right at the station museum.
>> Regards from Grove City (right along your route) in Penna----Mike Schleigh
>> On Saturday, July 30, 2022, 11:44:45 AM EDT, Robert G P <bobgp5109@...> wrote:
>>
>> Hello all,
>>
>> I will be in Pittsburgh and Northwestern PA and the most eastern point of OH this weekend and am curious if there are any accessible preserved/stored/derelict transition era cars of any type known to be in the region along (and not far from) the I-79 corridor north of Pittsburgh? Or in the vicinity of Pittsburgh? Even as far East as Erie?
>> Will also be watching trains in Pitts as well. 
>> Thanks a lot! 
>> -Bob
>
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Re: Preserved cars in northwestern PA

Robert G P
 

Thank you guys a lot! Very handy information!


-Bob

On Sat, Jul 30, 2022 at 3:46 PM Schleigh Mike via groups.io <mike_schleigh=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Bob!

Titusville (Oil Creek & Titusville) has a three-compartment Standard Tank Car Shell Tanker we have mentioned in the past.  Lake Shore Railway at North East (just east of Erie on US 20) has an AC&F built X-3 as well as a number of freight and passenger cars.  Not to mention quite a collection of GE locos and a nifty fireless Heisler.  Lots of freight trains on the old NYC and NKP main lines right at the station museum.

Regards from Grove City (right along your route) in Penna----Mike Schleigh

On Saturday, July 30, 2022, 11:44:45 AM EDT, Robert G P <bobgp5109@...> wrote:


Hello all,

I will be in Pittsburgh and Northwestern PA and the most eastern point of OH this weekend and am curious if there are any accessible preserved/stored/derelict transition era cars of any type known to be in the region along (and not far from) the I-79 corridor north of Pittsburgh? Or in the vicinity of Pittsburgh? Even as far East as Erie?

Will also be watching trains in Pitts as well. 

Thanks a lot! 
-Bob


Re: Bobber 2 Axle caboose late usage

Hudson Leighton
 


Re: Bobber 2 Axle caboose late usage

np328
 

Robert,

    On the old STMFC Yahoo list I wrote about what might have been the origin of the demise of bobber cabooses.

      As I recall finding, there was a bobber caboose in Washington State on a stopped train that was run into by a following train. The caboose was reduced to “kindling” however one of the crew was trapped in the wreckage. There was a lit coal stove in the caboose wreckage that soon spread its fire to the wood of the splintered caboose and the cries of a trapped crew member trapped in spite of the efforts of others to free him. (1912-1914 +/-)

     Newspaper clippings found in my railroad's files told of the shrieking of the victim being burnt alive clearly being heard by onlookers who could not clear timbers fast enough due to the intensity of the spreading blaze as the above was happening, and the horrific account was carried nationally. This same newspaper report and the nationwide public response to it were listed by further letters in the railroad file as the basis of the “24 foot” caboose rule. (Recall also that in this date frame railroad switchmen would still be familiar with link and pin coupling and a railroad man was at that time known by his missing fingers.)  

The letters relate that the 24-foot length was chosen so that two trucks were required. However, steel underframes were not required. Only that buffing forces of a certain threshold were met. Letters between the officers and the mechanical forces lament that the size of wood truss required to meet this this were as costly as steel underframes and would require major rebuilds of the caboose to install them and the railroad might as well install steel underframes at shopping intervals. The steel initially would cost marginally more however lower shopping costs to install them offset that to some degree. 

Now here is where it gets varied.

    Each state the NP ran through established their laws governing the cabooses and these rules did vary from state to state. Minnesota and Washington had the most comprehensive laws, followed by Montana (of which the pusher districts of the Rocky Mountains might have had some influence.) Oregon, North Dakota and Idaho lagged behind the others.

    In the case of the NP, they first put steel sills on cabooses used in mainline pusher districts. Pusher districts can and did exist outside of mountainous regions. This is true on any railroad climbing out of the Great Lakes basin, or the Mississippi River basins. North Dakota had several pusher districts.

This eliminated to some degree old bobbers. Others simply went away because of age.

    By the 1920s, the NP also standardized that all mainline and major branchlines should have steel sills. And all of that did take time so other cabooses did soldier on in use meanwhile. Letters in this file relate to government officials that progress was being made and in that the officials should find comfort in that. Letters from union officials relay about some conductors reporting being assigned boxcars as offices so the truth is somewhere in between.   

      Across the US, the response by other states was also varied, however it did seem to follow red state/blue state politics of those time frames and at that I’ll leave it there.

As last comments, I had seen in this same file noted above (actually more than an inch or so thick) that some older cabooses were sold off to minor logging railroads, so they could have had lives well beyond the timeframe you ask about. Cabooses are non-interchange equipment in this lists time frame, and as such I found NP cabooses that were retired, arch bar trucks and wood frames intact, after this lists end date since they are not subject to interchange rules.  All in yard service and quite close to a car shop it should be noted.     

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  James Dick - Roseville, MN


Re: A few reefers unloading produce in Chicago

O Fenton Wells
 

Great photo thanks for sharing 
Fenton 


On Jul 30, 2022, at 6:49 PM, Charlie Duckworth via groups.io <Worth51@...> wrote:


Three Sunshine Cars Left - For Sale

Tom Lawler
 

I have three cars that remain from the group I sold earlier this week. As follows:

2 - Sunshine 70.5 Western Maryland 52’ Gon, Wood Floor, Duryea underframe
1 - Sunshine 67.12 W&LE/NKP 40’ Fixed End Gon, Steel Floor

60/each. Take 1, take all 3. To help get rid of the last three I will pay the postage. Please respond off list if you are interested.

Tom


A few reefers unloading produce in Chicago

Charlie Duckworth
 


Re: Preserved cars in northwestern PA

Schleigh Mike
 

Hi Bob!

Titusville (Oil Creek & Titusville) has a three-compartment Standard Tank Car Shell Tanker we have mentioned in the past.  Lake Shore Railway at North East (just east of Erie on US 20) has an AC&F built X-3 as well as a number of freight and passenger cars.  Not to mention quite a collection of GE locos and a nifty fireless Heisler.  Lots of freight trains on the old NYC and NKP main lines right at the station museum.

Regards from Grove City (right along your route) in Penna----Mike Schleigh

On Saturday, July 30, 2022, 11:44:45 AM EDT, Robert G P <bobgp5109@...> wrote:


Hello all,

I will be in Pittsburgh and Northwestern PA and the most eastern point of OH this weekend and am curious if there are any accessible preserved/stored/derelict transition era cars of any type known to be in the region along (and not far from) the I-79 corridor north of Pittsburgh? Or in the vicinity of Pittsburgh? Even as far East as Erie?

Will also be watching trains in Pitts as well. 

Thanks a lot! 
-Bob


Re: Preserved cars in northwestern PA

StephenK
 

Don't forget the railroad museum in Conneaut, Ohio.  Conneaut is just over the PA border 

 https://nrhs.com/chapters/ohio/conneaut/?utm_source=Ashtabula-County-Visitors-Bureau&utm_medium=ACVB-Listing&utm_campaign=ACVB-Website

Steve Kay


Re: Bobber 2 Axle caboose late usage

Bruce Smith
 

Bob,

I am most familiar with this subject as it relates to the PRR, in no small part due to Bob Johnson's outstanding PRR Cabin Car book. 

The downfall of the 4-wheel bobber can be directly correlated with the "caboose laws" of the early nineteen teens. These laws, originating in many Mid-Atlantic states, were written by each state in collaboration with the railroad brotherhoods, and therefore, while they were often very similar, the laws did vary. Typically, they required such features as a minimum length (often 24'), a steel underframe, minimum strength, minimum number and size of bunks, minimum platform size, etc...  Some specified 4-wheel trucks, which was an obvious shot at bobbers. Some of these laws only applied to trips over a certain length, giving a loophole for some bobbers. 

The PRR had hundreds of old, wood underframe cars which were replaced by steel N5 cabins on Lines East, and were rebuilt into woo N6A/N6B cabins on Lines West. The PRR also had hundreds of brand new steel underframe ND bobbers, and in several states, these cabins continued in service into the late 1950s. Typical service for these cars was transfer service, locals, and yard service. 

So yes, it is perfectly reasonable to have a bobber in service, at least in some locations, during the 1940s and 1950s, however, it should have a steel underframe and other modern crew accoutrements.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Robert G P <bobgp5109@...>
Sent: Saturday, July 30, 2022 11:28 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] Bobber 2 Axle caboose late usage
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.
Wonder about accounts of late (late 40's to mid 50's) usage of the shor 4 wheel bobber cabooses? 

I dont expect road service to be in the min (local maybe) but know they still were used as yard pilots/platforms in some instances in the late 40's. 

We have a very detailed one on our club layout which generates smiles/frowns equally! Ive personally recommended tossing it out the door into the gravel but a member has had it since the '60s! -So with my vote it stays...

We use it to switch in the yard just for fun. 

-Thanks
Bob


Re: Bobber 2 Axle caboose late usage

Nelson Moyer
 

The earliest bobber retirement I know of was B&O in 1913. The CB&Q retired their two classes of bobbers in the late 1930s. I don’t know of any bobbers in use after that.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert G P
Sent: Saturday, July 30, 2022 11:28 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Bobber 2 Axle caboose late usage

 

Wonder about accounts of late (late 40's to mid 50's) usage of the shor 4 wheel bobber cabooses? 

 

I dont expect road service to be in the min (local maybe) but know they still were used as yard pilots/platforms in some instances in the late 40's. 

 

We have a very detailed one on our club layout which generates smiles/frowns equally! Ive personally recommended tossing it out the door into the gravel but a member has had it since the '60s! -So with my vote it stays...

 

We use it to switch in the yard just for fun. 

 

-Thanks

Bob


Bobber 2 Axle caboose late usage

Robert G P
 

Wonder about accounts of late (late 40's to mid 50's) usage of the shor 4 wheel bobber cabooses? 

I dont expect road service to be in the min (local maybe) but know they still were used as yard pilots/platforms in some instances in the late 40's. 

We have a very detailed one on our club layout which generates smiles/frowns equally! Ive personally recommended tossing it out the door into the gravel but a member has had it since the '60s! -So with my vote it stays...

We use it to switch in the yard just for fun. 

-Thanks
Bob

2741 - 2760 of 197080