Date   

Re: ERDX 11000 series

Seth Lakin
 

Bud, there is one photo of a logoed ERDX reefer in the collection of the New York Central System Historical Society online photo archive. 

https://nycshs.omeka.net/items/show/97438

Plus another at I have a other photo of a logoed car in my files that I got from a website that appears to now be off line. 

The NYCSHS also has many builders photos of non logoed cars along with mechanical drawings of the cars. 


Seth Lakin
Michigan City, IN
Director, Modelers Committee Chairman 
New York Central System Historical Society 


Re: History of the Forklift

Eric Hansmann
 

On 08/28/2022 11:15 AM CDT Dennis Storzek wrote:
Got to be careful with the terminology. If that figure included "powered industrial trucks" of all types, it also includes the tractors designed to tow trains of carts as used by the post office and express companies. One common brand of fork lift trucks during the fifties was Tow Motor, which should give some hint as to the origins of the product line.
==================
 
These tractors are noted in John A. Droege's "Freight Terminals & Trains" was first published in 1912 and again in 1925. Chapter Twelve, the Mechanical Handling of Merchandise Freight, includes references to electric freight trucks used within large freight terminals. I've frequently consulted this book for freight operations details.

The NMRA reprinted the 1925 edition in 1998. New copies are available through the NMRA Store. A number of used versions are available through booksellers.

The 1912 edition is available to read and/or download through Open Library. Chapter Twelve starts on page 327.
https://openlibrary.org/books/OL6546206M/Freight_terminals_and_trains
 
I did not see a specific reference to fork lift trucks.
 

Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


AMB laserkit

ed_mines
 

I found this caboose offered for sale on E bay. It is listed as Ambroid but I know it isn't. I think it was made by AMB laserkit & sold by someone else.

Look at the window on the left. It's tilted a little. Aren't the windows on AMB cabooses cut out when you get the kit?


Re: What’s the difference between the Intermountain and Kadee PS-1 besides price and details

Clark Propst
 

Ed did a fantastic clinic on PS-1s at the Collinsville ILL. meet a few years back. Was hoping to see a RP Cyc on this subject, but hasn’t materialized yet.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: History of the Forklift

Ken Adams
 

Actually if you look at the following article on pallets in Packaging Revolution website, it details the change to pallets for military supplies during WW 2 as the impetus for industry to adopt this method of shipping. Also during WW 2 and after there was a shortage of civilian labor, particularly low cost labor,  to manually load and unload box cars and refrigerator cars (house cars) which drove a lot of changes in materials handling. I the depression era unskilled manual labor was cheap and very plentiful. But by the late 1930's labor costs were rising as the US began to emerge from the depression. 

On a modeling note I have a pair of Accurail plug door reefers awaiting modification to early 1950's PFE R-40-26's following Jason Hill's blogs on his conversions.  But they will be for static depictions of overhead traffic on my tiny layout with no customers who load or unload reefers. 
--
Ken Adams
Covid Variants may come and go but I choose to still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: What’s the difference between the Intermountain and Kadee PS-1 besides price and details

Charlie Duckworth
 

Thanks, Ed Hawkins walked me through the differences on the phone yesterday as I’ve got the 1948 version coming. 
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: History of the Forklift

Andy Miller
 

As far as I know, the fork lift was one of the great developments of WWII.   After the war it was considered THE way to load and unload boxcars.  Refers could use it also but had a serious problem.  With the exception of SFRD, all reefers had 4 foot, hinged leaf, doors. The sliding doors of boxcars would not seal the car for insulation!  (SFRDs door were 5’)  Very few fork lifts would fit through a 4’ (or 5’)door.   The doors could not be made wider because reefers (and box cars) were frequently loaded on parallel tracks, the outer cars being accesses by going through the inner cars.  This worked well with the sliding doors of box cars, but meant that reefers hinged doors could be no more that 2.5 feet wide if they were to be opened when parked next to cars on the adjacent tracks.  The solution was the plug door reefer!  And after WWII the plug door, iced, reefer became more and more common.  Unfortunately, for the longest time, they had been almost non-existent in HO.  I had kitbashed several for my fleet, thus (as always) inspiring a manufacturer, Accurail, to finally make one.

 

Regards,

Andy  Miller

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ray Breyer via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, August 27, 2022 7:24 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io; main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] History of the Forklift

 

Careful with this: the combination of forklifts AND pallets is a post-1930 "thing", meaning that pre-Depression modelers shouldn't really have either.

 

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL

 

 

 

On Saturday, August 27, 2022 at 06:04:24 PM CDT, Ken Adams <smadanek44g@...> wrote:

 

 

They're older than you might think.

https://packagingrevolution.net/history-of-the-fork-truck/
--
Ken Adams
Covid Variants may come and go but I choose to still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: History of the Forklift

Tony Thompson
 

I have read that the real enlargement of palletizing freight was in World War II, where it turned out to be a great way to prepare overseas military cargo, and after the war became far more widely adopted. But I’m no expert on this topic.

Tony Thompson
tony@...


Re: History of the Forklift

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, Aug 28, 2022 at 07:55 AM, A&Y Dave in MD wrote:
1000 industrial lift trucks of all types in 1926 across the hundreds of thousands of stations/depots according to the naval history paper in the link. Less than 1 in a hundred railroad depots IF they were randomly distributed. The military or merchant marine might have them at docks and forts.
Got to be careful with the terminology. If that figure included "powered industrial trucks" of all types, it also includes the tractors designed to tow trains of carts as used by the post office and express companies. One common brand of fork lift trucks during the fifties was Tow Motor, which should give some hint as to the origins of the product line.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Replacement Steps for Intermountain R-40-23 cars

Pierre Oliver
 

Or
Order more than one item
Or
Combine orders with friends 

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com


On Aug 28, 2022, at 11:26 AM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



But -- $12 minimum postage to the USA... so unless you see Pierre at a train show...



On 8/22/2022 9:37 PM, gary laakso wrote:
Yarmouth Model Works has a set for these cars with a lower price.

Gary Laakso
Northwest of Mike Brock


On Aug 22, 2022, at 4:19 PM, Paul Koehler <koehlers@...> wrote:

All:

 

Recently Tony and I have discussed replacement Stirrup steps for the Intermountain R-40-23 cars. Attached is a photo of a sprue with one of the steps still attached. The sprues will have six steps attached. I am having these castings re-cast. Anyone who would like to get in on the order reply offline to me, koehlers at earthlink.net. The sprues will cost $7.00 each plus postage. The deadline to order will be September 12th.

 

Paul C. Koehler

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: What’s the difference between the Intermountain and Kadee PS-1 besides price and details

O Fenton Wells
 

That's a good catch Tim, I had forgotten about that from Kadee.
Thanks
Fenton

On Sun, Aug 28, 2022 at 11:43 AM Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
Charlie

KADEE now makes the 1948 version of the PS-1 with the early roof and ends. That's where you may want to start !


On 8/26/2022 1:47 PM, Charlie Duckworth via groups.io wrote:
I’m looking at building the Seaboard AF-4 DD PS-1.  The PP I found recommends using the IM PS-1. Is there any reason why the Kadee PS-1 can’t be used?
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: What’s the difference between the Intermountain and Kadee PS-1 besides price and details

Tim O'Connor
 

Charlie

KADEE now makes the 1948 version of the PS-1 with the early roof and ends. That's where you may want to start !


On 8/26/2022 1:47 PM, Charlie Duckworth via groups.io wrote:

I’m looking at building the Seaboard AF-4 DD PS-1.  The PP I found recommends using the IM PS-1. Is there any reason why the Kadee PS-1 can’t be used?
--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Soo double door box car

Tim O'Connor
 


Plus a Rock Island USRA rebuild.

It looks like the automobile fell off the bridge onto the train car first, and then bounced into the street.
It looks to be in pretty good shape for that kind of a fall  :-)


On 8/24/2022 11:21 AM, ed_mines via groups.io wrote:

Found this picture with a Soo double door box car on e bay

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Replacement Steps for Intermountain R-40-23 cars

Tim O'Connor
 


But -- $12 minimum postage to the USA... so unless you see Pierre at a train show...



On 8/22/2022 9:37 PM, gary laakso wrote:

Yarmouth Model Works has a set for these cars with a lower price.

Gary Laakso
Northwest of Mike Brock


On Aug 22, 2022, at 4:19 PM, Paul Koehler <koehlers@...> wrote:

All:

 

Recently Tony and I have discussed replacement Stirrup steps for the Intermountain R-40-23 cars. Attached is a photo of a sprue with one of the steps still attached. The sprues will have six steps attached. I am having these castings re-cast. Anyone who would like to get in on the order reply offline to me, koehlers at earthlink.net. The sprues will cost $7.00 each plus postage. The deadline to order will be September 12th.

 

Paul C. Koehler

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: History of the Forklift

Bill Parks
 

On Sun, Aug 28, 2022 at 08:55 AM, A&Y Dave in MD wrote:
I would expect them to be regularly visible during or after WWII
I would say instead that "they became more visible during or after WWII".  

What would need to be looked at (and is beyond the scope of this group - more appropriate for the Ry-Ops-IndustrialSIG group) would be when did specific industries shift to using pallets.  I doubt it was an overnight event that impacted every industry, instead was probably spread over the decade (and maybe even into the 60s).  As one of the other articles related to the link in the OP states, pallets were originally used more for internal shipments, as shippers weren't always aware if the consignees could handle pallets, and also the desire of getting the pallets sipped back to them for reuse.

As an example, fresh produce was still being shipped in ice bunker reefers, which generally had 4 1/2 foot wide doors, and were loaded/unloaded manually with hand carts. So a forklift a packing house would be out of place.

However, frozen foods, which took off during the 50s was shipped in mechanical reefers with wider doors (and some ice bunker reefers built with heavier insulation and wider sliding plug doors) was shipped using pallets (same can be said of canned and other preprocessed foods that would use bunkerless reefers or insulated boxcars).

As an aside, the other thing that happened during this period was the shift away from crates to cardboard boxes as the primary way of packing goods.
 
--
Bill Parks
Cumming, GA
Modelling the Seaboard Airline in Central Florida


ERDX 11000 series

Bud Rindfleisch
 

Gents, 
    I'm looking for photos or one photo, of the Eastern States Dispatch 11000 series insulated boxes "with" the circular logo. These cars are lettered ERDX and are the taller of the two series being an inside height of 10'0". I know these existed as I'd seen them in a video of the Nickel Plate running alongside the lower height 10000 series cars, all had the large circular logos. The only photo I have shows the cars without the logo and "refrigerated" lettering but they're not reefers.
     Bud Rindfleisch


Re: History of the Forklift

A&Y Dave in MD
 

Exactly. One could argue there have been computers since the 19th century, but they weren’t visible in society until after WWII and not commonly visible until 1970s or 1980s.

1000 industrial lift trucks of all types in 1926 across the hundreds of thousands of stations/depots according to the naval history paper in the link. Less than 1 in a hundred railroad depots IF they were randomly distributed. The military or merchant marine might have them at docks and forts. They would also be located

The Great Depression would slow down adoption due to less capital and so many laborers available looking for work. Those who like unique items might model them but I would expect them to be regularly visible during or after WWII.

Dave
--
____________________________
David Bott, modeling the A&Y in '34


Re: History of the Forklift

Jack Mullen
 

On Sat, Aug 27, 2022 at 04:31 PM, Todd Sullivan wrote:
I was corrected to always call them 'fork trucks', not 'forklifts'.
Fork truck, fork lift truck, forklift, lift truck - all are commonly used terms for pretty much the same thing. If Alstom had safety rules referring to "fork trucks", that might be a good reason to insist that that term be used. Otherwise it seems pretty much tomato/tomahto.
FWIW, OSHA refers to "powered industrial trucks", a more generic term, but the required training-certification seems to be universally known as "forklift certification" in industry.

Jack Mullen, who operated them before certification was a thing.


Re: QUESTION ON BRAKE STEP

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Hi Earl:

I would like to obtain four of the brake steps in HO.  Shipping cost is not a factor.

Please provide a price and the preferred means of payment.

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Earl Tuson <etuson@...>
Date: 8/26/22 1:28 PM (GMT-10:00)
To: RealSTMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] QUESTION ON BRAKE STEP

> While researching potential improvements on some Frisco cars I came
> across a reference to a Wass - Morton brake step.  I was able to obtain
> the attached photo.I can't quite determine if the step is perforated or
> if this has button bumps.

The Kass brake step appears to have used the same pattern as the
passenger step boxes also produced by the company. I discovered that
Jeff English had one of the latter in his cellar when I visited this
year, and I measured it then. I made a CAD file for a brake step based
on this, as I was working on a RI 40' Fowler car that also featured this
appliance. I can print them out in any scale, but shipping them might be
cost prohibitive based on just one tiny part.

Earl Tuson






Re: Photo: Railroad yard at U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Duquesne, PA (1956)

gtws00
 

Ken, I have been using Albion Brass wire. It comes in metric and I buy .4mm which is .016
Here is a link to a source that sells here in the states> Many other special shapes and micro tubing.
ALBBW04 Albion Alloys Brass Rod - 0.4mm (10pcs) - Sprue Brothers Models LLC

George Toman

3661 - 3680 of 198607