Date   

Re: SAL AF-1/2 & B-7

Brian Carlson
 

Smokey mountain model works did these in HO and S years back.

Not sure if Jim would consider them again in HO. No, I’m not selling mine.   

Brian J. Carlson 

On Nov 11, 2018, at 6:13 PM, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

R Wilson asked:
"Would it be possible to just take an AAR '37 10'er, replace the roof and ends to get one of these? Is it such that the sides would have to be reduced in height? 
Looking to get a prototypical model of them and want to do it right."

Tim O'Connor replied:
"Aren't they basically PRR X31's with different ends and rivet patterns?
My instinct would be to start with the Bowser and figure out how to replace the ends, and use Archer rivets for the rest."

Not really.  The SAL cars are more akin to the 1932 ARA boxcar design, with different side rivet patterns (double rows, plus an odd 5-panel to the left of the door/4-panel right of the door pattern for the single door PRR cars) and tabbed side sills.  You'd have to redo the sides and underframe if you start from the Bowser model, which actually would be almost as much work as starting with the old MDC model, which has an incorrect roof profile and a caricature of the Pullman carbuilders' ends.  Still, it's a doable kitbash if you can come up with the ends; just not as straightforward of one as you'd think.  

Sadly, the best approach would be to pony up for a Sunshine kit for the automobile cars (assuming that the original poster is working in HO scale).  No real help for the single door cars except for the suggested kitbashes.


Ben Hom   


Re: SAL AF-1/2 & B-7

Benjamin Hom
 

R Wilson asked:
"Would it be possible to just take an AAR '37 10'er, replace the roof and ends to get one of these? Is it such that the sides would have to be reduced in height? 
Looking to get a prototypical model of them and want to do it right."

Tim O'Connor replied:
"Aren't they basically PRR X31's with different ends and rivet patterns?
My instinct would be to start with the Bowser and figure out how to replace the ends, and use Archer rivets for the rest."

Not really.  The SAL cars are more akin to the 1932 ARA boxcar design, with different side rivet patterns (double rows, plus an odd 5-panel to the left of the door/4-panel right of the door pattern for the single door PRR cars) and tabbed side sills.  You'd have to redo the sides and underframe if you start from the Bowser model, which actually would be almost as much work as starting with the old MDC model, which has an incorrect roof profile and a caricature of the Pullman carbuilders' ends.  Still, it's a doable kitbash if you can come up with the ends; just not as straightforward of one as you'd think.  

Sadly, the best approach would be to pony up for a Sunshine kit for the automobile cars (assuming that the original poster is working in HO scale).  No real help for the single door cars except for the suggested kitbashes.


Ben Hom   


Re: Chalk Marks Question

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

OMG Bob! An Athearn Blue Box Lehigh Valley car complete with claws for the door??? Say it isn't so!

Cordially,, Don Valentine


Re: SAL AF-1/2 & B-7

Tim O'Connor
 


Aren't they basically PRR X31's with different ends and rivet patterns?
My instinct would be to start with the Bowser and figure out how to replace
the ends, and use Archer rivets for the rest.

Tim O'


would it be possible to just take an AAR '37 10'er, replace the roof and ends to get one of these? is it such that the sides would have to be reduced in height? looking to get a prototypical model of them and want to do it right.

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


SAL AF-1/2 & B-7

rwilson1056
 

would it be possible to just take an AAR '37 10'er, replace the roof and ends to get one of these? is it such that the sides would have to be reduced in height?
looking to get a prototypical model of them and want to do it right.


Re: Free Parts for Chicagoland Mini-Kit

Michael Gross
 

Dear All,

The mini-kit parts went quickly.  Thanks for your response.

Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA


Free Parts for Chicagoland Mini-Kit

Michael Gross
 

Dear All,

I attended the 2018 Chicagoland RPM, and received resin parts and decals for this year's mini-kit offering, a Fruit Growers Express truss rod reefer, series 14000 and 20000.  This is a prototype I will not need for my modeling purposes, so I will gladly gift these parts and decals to a modeler who wants to give them a good home.  I will also send a PDF of the instructions.

Note, the modeler will have to provide an HO Accurail wood reef, a Tichy Bettendorf steel under frame (part #3030), 10" queen posts (part #3074), turnbuckles (part #8021), wire or fishing line for the truss rods, brake gear, Kadee 158 whisker couplers, and assorted styrene.

The resin parts are quite nicely done.

If interested, contact me off list at ActorMichaelGross AT gmail DOT com.

Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA


Re: Chalk Marks Question

Bob Chaparro
 

From my research the wax crayons were favored by Federal inspectors for their water resistance. For railroaders chalk was easier to wipe off so that out of date instructions were eliminated. If weather was a problem marks on boxcars would be made under the door track. Truck frames also were marked as an alternative.
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

 


Re: Chalk Marks Question

jczzo126 CocuzzaT
 

In my time on the Reading and Conrail, we used a 'paint stick' which is like a very waxy crayon. I still have one or two some where in my memorabilia. The advantage was, it didn't wash off (EVER!), and could be used in extreme hot or cold.


Re: Chalk Marks Question (Prismacolor Verithin Pencils Available From Blick)

Bob Chaparro
 

On line from Dick Blick Art Materials:

https://www.dickblick.com/products/prismacolor-verithin-pencils/

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Chalk Marks Question

Bob Chaparro
 

In the photo below, markers were used on left side of the boxcar, pencils used on right. The tips on the markers just were not fine enough, although the Sharpie was an "extra fine point". The Pen-touch was a 0.7mm point, about the same size as the Sharpie.

Also, the pencil marks were easy to remove. No so for the markers.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Offered-Rapido pre-war K brake NP DS box cars

Andy Carlson
 

Hi-
I have a 4 pack of Rapido Northern Pacific double sheathed box cars. These are #s 130001-1 through -4,
1) NP 10176
2) NP 11968
3) NP 12999
4) NP 13787

Offered for $149, USPS Priority shipping included. I accept checks and money orders. For a small fee PayPal is accepted. VContact me off-list for details.<midcentury@...>
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: boxcars loaded with cigars

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

Gene Autry was once a railroad telegrapher. He maintained a lifelong interest in railroads, and was responsible for the preservation to at least two steam locomotives. He also had a miniature railroad on his ranch upon which he personally ran an 18" gauge pacific done in SP Daylight colors.

Sorry, no freight car content here.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

On 11/10/18 11:27 AM, Jon Miller wrote:

On 11/10/2018 8:16 AM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
I thought some might be interested in these views showing boxcars loaded with cigars - they would be better images but for the stupid banners that occlude the reporting marks!


    I find this interesting and it gives away my age.

"1988 by actor and businessman Gene Autry as "Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum"

--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Chalk Marks Question

naptownprr
 

d'accord!


Jim Hunter


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Saturday, November 10, 2018 10:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Chalk Marks Question
 

For something like this, I think the "French Gray" pencil color is just right.

Tim O'Connor

------------------------

 That bright white is good for representing paint pens, which are used for marking steel or similar objects more or less permanently.  They probably originated in the fifties / sixties.  They're not good for representing chalk, and I don't think any carmen were ever in the habit of using a paint pen, except perhaps for things like the 'white-lining' or lining out a car number to signify that the car has been stricken off the roster.
 Ron Merrick


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Chalk Marks Question

Tim O'Connor
 


For something like this, I think the "French Gray" pencil color is just right.

Tim O'Connor

------------------------

 That bright white is good for representing paint pens, which are used for marking steel or similar objects more or less permanently.  They probably originated in the fifties / sixties.  They're not good for representing chalk, and I don't think any carmen were ever in the habit of using a paint pen, except perhaps for things like the 'white-lining' or lining out a car number to signify that the car has been stricken off the roster.
 Ron Merrick


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Chalk Marks Question

Tim O'Connor
 

Michael

That's a very nice assortment of chalk marks! Really good weathering on the
truck sideframes too.

Tim


I use Prismacolor Premier pencils for older chalk marks; water slide decals and Clover House dry transfers for newer  markings.  As others have stated, pencils (and most other weathering) adheres better to a "toothy" matte finish.  For an example, of old and new marks, see the Kadee BX-57 photo attached here.

Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA

Attachments:

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Chalk Marks Question

mopacfirst
 

That bright white is good for representing paint pens, which are used for marking steel or similar objects more or less permanently.  They probably originated in the fifties / sixties.  They're not good for representing chalk, and I don't think any carmen were ever in the habit of using a paint pen, except perhaps for things like the 'white-lining' or lining out a car number to signify that the car has been stricken off the roster.

Ron Merrick


Re: Chalk Marks Question

Michael Gross
 

I use Prismacolor Premier pencils for older chalk marks; water slide decals and Clover House dry transfers for newer  markings.  As others have stated, pencils (and most other weathering) adheres better to a "toothy" matte finish.  For an example, of old and new marks, see the Kadee BX-57 photo attached here.

Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA


Re: Chalk Marks Question

Tony Thompson
 

Tim is right about how bright the pens are. I would say WAY too bright and hard to make the stroke thin enuf. 
Tony Thompson 


On Nov 10, 2018, at 7:42 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Tom

An alternative to the pencils would be to use Gelly Roll white pens, which
have a VERY bright, opaque white ink. Many modelers use them to simulate the
bright white markings seen on steel plates. (I think decals for steel plate loads
were also done by Sunshine.)

You can write with the pens onto decal paper, then transfer the ones you like to
your cars.

https://www.amazon.com/Sakura-57457-Gelly-Classic-White/dp/B075VLPL1C

I like the pencils because they are NOT overly bright, but I also have the pens.

Tim O'Connor



 Scott, I get the same result as you trying to use the Prismacolor Premiere.
 Will look for the Verithin kind, but apparently no shops in Denmark carry those.

 On the same note, what kind, brand and model,  do you use to make the individual boards on wood sided cars look lightly
 weathered? Here I have the same problem to some extent. Kind regards
 Tom Larsen Holte, Denmark


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Chalk Marks Question

Tim O'Connor
 

Tom

An alternative to the pencils would be to use Gelly Roll white pens, which
have a VERY bright, opaque white ink. Many modelers use them to simulate the
bright white markings seen on steel plates. (I think decals for steel plate loads
were also done by Sunshine.)

You can write with the pens onto decal paper, then transfer the ones you like to
your cars.

https://www.amazon.com/Sakura-57457-Gelly-Classic-White/dp/B075VLPL1C

I like the pencils because they are NOT overly bright, but I also have the pens.

Tim O'Connor



 Scott, I get the same result as you trying to use the Prismacolor Premiere.
 Will look for the Verithin kind, but apparently no shops in Denmark carry those.

 On the same note, what kind, brand and model,  do you use to make the individual boards on wood sided cars look lightly
 weathered? Here I have the same problem to some extent. Kind regards
 Tom Larsen Holte, Denmark


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

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