Date   

Re: Using Krystal Klear for Windows or as an Adhesive

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

Testors makes a similar product called "Clear Parts Cement and Window Maker". It is much runnier than KK, and I gave up on making caboose cupola windows with it. I was able to use it as an adhesive to hold styrene "glass" in place. It comes in an applicator bottle, in theory making it much easier to apply than KK.

Neither Microscale nor Testors tell us what is in their bottles, and I was unable to find any information online about their products. They appear to be similar to polyvinal acetate or what our English friends refer to as PVA. We know PVA as white carpenters' glue, or Elmer's Glue-All. PVA generally dries brittle, while the Microscale and Testors products stay rubbery for years, so there has to be some difference.

Is canopy glue the same sort of product?

Some of you have mentioned acrylic floor waxes such as Future. Can this be used for making windows? Minwax makes a product called "Polycrylic", which is a water-based substitute for polyethylene varnishes. It appears to be similar to a very thick floor wax, and might have applications for models ( maybe you could thin it with water and shoot it with an airbrush). I sometimes use this on crested arrows because it will not dissolve oil-based paints used to make the cresting bands (though it does a great job making a mess water-based inks). I generally use Polycrylic for the first seal coat over oil crests, then switch to polyeurethane for the second and third seal coats.

Some of you have a chemical background. Any comments?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 1/11/17 12:16 AM, James Cocuzza jczzo126@... [STMFC] wrote:

 
I have used KK for quite some time. My railroad is in a basement garage, and over the years, some KK windows have shrunk or cracked. The good news is that you can usually wet it or cut it out with an X-acto knife and do it all over. I have several 35 to 40 year cabooses I did this with. However, I have had problems occasionally with Dullcote, or Glosscote, I think, ruining the window, making it sag. I should switch to Future. KK is excellent for attaching sheet styrene windows, because it doesn't fog and dries clear. Again, I have some 20+ year old Walthers passenger cars kits did this to, all the glass is still in. I also used it to put MV lenses or jewels in marker lights, much easier to work with for these little parts.

On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 12:41 PM, jimbetz jimbetz@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi,

When using KK for windows ...

KK does not normally dry in less than 4 to as much as 24
hours. It will usually skin over in about an hour. I normally
set the model aside for 12 to 24 hours.
After you close the space up with the toothpick draw the
toothpick out very slowly - do other windows on the same
side of the model - and set it down with the window side UP.
This will create a window that is all one thickness.
The thickness of the window frame determines the
thickness of the KK window. If you are doing a blue box
Athearn caboose they will be "coke bottle thick" - and
you will have to apply KK more than once in order to
get it to have a flat appearance. You can add more KK
layers on top of layers that aren't fully dry ... but if they
haven't at least fully skinned over you will have to wait
before applying a following layer. Multiple layers can
take 2 or more -days- to dry fully.
KK wants to/will almost always form a fillet at any
corner ... it will not lay flat against an edge that is 90
degrees from the face. This can/will create a 'wrong'
look. An additional layer that fills the space will
correct this - be careful about not getting too much
across the window face because it can also have a
curl down at the edges which looks just as 'wrong'.
Using KK for windows on painted brass models is
surprisingly easy/effective. The walls of brass
models are thin and it only takes one time to get
a window that looks darn good.
KK will never look as transparent/flat as using
some clear plastic (acetate or styrene) or actual.
And it won't have that mirror like aspect to the
surface that reflects the surroundings. But it
still can be used very effectively ... and most guys
won't notice that you didn't use the good stuff.

Using KK as an adhesive ...

KK makes an -excellent- adhesive and for certain
applications it is unsurpassed. Yes, it has a -very-
slow drying time ... but that can be an asset as well
as an issue.
You have to 'support' the two parts in such a way
that they don't move while the KK dries and sometimes
that is difficult.
Because it forms a fillet - KK is much stronger for
joining parts that need it. Such as gluing the cab
shades on an HO diesel.
Because KK dries -clear- you can use it on painted
models. Often, especially if you use care in how
much KK you use, any 'extra' amount of KK will be
invisible ... or at most form a clear puddle that
resembles "ice".
KK accepts all types of paint (they all stick to it).
Be doubly certain it is fully dry before you paint
over it. I use 48 hours as my rule of thumb for
how long after applying KK that I will paint it.
KK can form an adhoc "bracket" ... for instance
you can apply it up and over the edges of a lead
weight and when it is dry it will hold the lead in
place 'for ever'.

KK does not get soft due to humidity - but if you
apply a drop of water on it and set it aside for at
least an hour (some times as long as 2 or even 4)
it will soften and the two parts previously glued
to each other can be separated. With enough
time and reapplication of KK its former presence
on a part(s) can be undetectable.

I believe that KK is "some form of white glue". I
don't know what Microscale adds to it. I don't
really care. I consider it to be "worth it".
Yes, you can add some water to a bottle of KK
and recover its previous consistency if you left
it open by accident. How much? I just guess.
(Start small and add more if not enough?)

No, KK is not my "go to" product for windows or as an
adhesive ... it is "one of the options that I consider".
I do find I use it "once in every week when I'm doing
any modeling on 4 or more days of that week" ... YMMV.
- Jim B.






Re: Monon #37 w/Archer Surface Details Update

riverman_vt@...
 

   That is beautiful work, Bill, but leaves one big question in my mind. What are you 
going to do about the grossly high ribs of the roof seams. Dick S. tried to convince
me to purchase the C&BT line from him some years ago but the cost of retooling 
the roofs to get rid of that issue, added to what he wanted for the tooling, was
enough to put me off. He swore up and down that he and another fellow has salvaged
a piece of a freight car roof and taken the rib height measurements from that piece 
but the piece was never seen when his measurements were questioned. To me it is
the only serious problem with the line.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Monon #37 w/Archer Surface Details Update

Richard Townsend
 

Tony,
 
Could you explain a little more about why you say the Archer panel lines aren't appropriate?
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC
Sent: Tue, Jan 10, 2017 5:14 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Monon #37 w/Archer Surface Details Update

 
Bill Welch wrote:

Here is the C&BT Car Shops body as 1947 Built Monon #37 in Badger’s “Stynylrez” Acrylic Polyurethane primer and the scratch built ladders attached. The photos show the Athearn rivet detail I added to the ends. As a reminder the Weld Lines are Archer’s Aircraft Panels Lines. The rivets on the ends of the roof and very ends of the side are Archer Rivets. The primer was applied at about 20-PSI w/my Badger 105 and .75mm needle/tip combo.

    The car looks very nice, Bill. The Archer panel lines are really not very appropriate if you look up close, as your photos permit us to do, but on any layout they would do the job you intend, namely to suggest separate panels. I like the result!

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Using Krystal Klear for Windows or as an Adhesive

jczzo126 CocuzzaT
 

I have used KK for quite some time. My railroad is in a basement garage, and over the years, some KK windows have shrunk or cracked. The good news is that you can usually wet it or cut it out with an X-acto knife and do it all over. I have several 35 to 40 year cabooses I did this with. However, I have had problems occasionally with Dullcote, or Glosscote, I think, ruining the window, making it sag. I should switch to Future. KK is excellent for attaching sheet styrene windows, because it doesn't fog and dries clear. Again, I have some 20+ year old Walthers passenger cars kits did this to, all the glass is still in. I also used it to put MV lenses or jewels in marker lights, much easier to work with for these little parts.

On Mon, Jan 9, 2017 at 12:41 PM, jimbetz jimbetz@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi,

When using KK for windows ...

KK does not normally dry in less than 4 to as much as 24
hours. It will usually skin over in about an hour. I normally
set the model aside for 12 to 24 hours.
After you close the space up with the toothpick draw the
toothpick out very slowly - do other windows on the same
side of the model - and set it down with the window side UP.
This will create a window that is all one thickness.
The thickness of the window frame determines the
thickness of the KK window. If you are doing a blue box
Athearn caboose they will be "coke bottle thick" - and
you will have to apply KK more than once in order to
get it to have a flat appearance. You can add more KK
layers on top of layers that aren't fully dry ... but if they
haven't at least fully skinned over you will have to wait
before applying a following layer. Multiple layers can
take 2 or more -days- to dry fully.
KK wants to/will almost always form a fillet at any
corner ... it will not lay flat against an edge that is 90
degrees from the face. This can/will create a 'wrong'
look. An additional layer that fills the space will
correct this - be careful about not getting too much
across the window face because it can also have a
curl down at the edges which looks just as 'wrong'.
Using KK for windows on painted brass models is
surprisingly easy/effective. The walls of brass
models are thin and it only takes one time to get
a window that looks darn good.
KK will never look as transparent/flat as using
some clear plastic (acetate or styrene) or actual.
And it won't have that mirror like aspect to the
surface that reflects the surroundings. But it
still can be used very effectively ... and most guys
won't notice that you didn't use the good stuff.

Using KK as an adhesive ...

KK makes an -excellent- adhesive and for certain
applications it is unsurpassed. Yes, it has a -very-
slow drying time ... but that can be an asset as well
as an issue.
You have to 'support' the two parts in such a way
that they don't move while the KK dries and sometimes
that is difficult.
Because it forms a fillet - KK is much stronger for
joining parts that need it. Such as gluing the cab
shades on an HO diesel.
Because KK dries -clear- you can use it on painted
models. Often, especially if you use care in how
much KK you use, any 'extra' amount of KK will be
invisible ... or at most form a clear puddle that
resembles "ice".
KK accepts all types of paint (they all stick to it).
Be doubly certain it is fully dry before you paint
over it. I use 48 hours as my rule of thumb for
how long after applying KK that I will paint it.
KK can form an adhoc "bracket" ... for instance
you can apply it up and over the edges of a lead
weight and when it is dry it will hold the lead in
place 'for ever'.

KK does not get soft due to humidity - but if you
apply a drop of water on it and set it aside for at
least an hour (some times as long as 2 or even 4)
it will soften and the two parts previously glued
to each other can be separated. With enough
time and reapplication of KK its former presence
on a part(s) can be undetectable.

I believe that KK is "some form of white glue". I
don't know what Microscale adds to it. I don't
really care. I consider it to be "worth it".
Yes, you can add some water to a bottle of KK
and recover its previous consistency if you left
it open by accident. How much? I just guess.
(Start small and add more if not enough?)

No, KK is not my "go to" product for windows or as an
adhesive ... it is "one of the options that I consider".
I do find I use it "once in every week when I'm doing
any modeling on 4 or more days of that week" ... YMMV.
- Jim B.



Re: Monon #37 w/Archer Surface Details Update

Tony Thompson
 

Bill Welch wrote:

Here is the C&BT Car Shops body as 1947 Built Monon #37 in Badger’s “Stynylrez” Acrylic Polyurethane primer and the scratch built ladders attached. The photos show the Athearn rivet detail I added to the ends. As a reminder the Weld Lines are Archer’s Aircraft Panels Lines. The rivets on the ends of the roof and very ends of the side are Archer Rivets. The primer was applied at about 20-PSI w/my Badger 105 and .75mm needle/tip combo.

    The car looks very nice, Bill. The Archer panel lines are really not very appropriate if you look up close, as your photos permit us to do, but on any layout they would do the job you intend, namely to suggest separate panels. I like the result!

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Monon #37 w/Archer Surface Details Update

Andy Carlson
 

Todd's suggestion reminds me of a somewhat similar technique for fine model building.

Back when I was first making riveted Z-bars for single sheathed box cars, I used the classic method of riveting a sheet of 0.010" styrene. After embossing the rivets, I would trim the rivet portion of the sheet to about 0.055" inch wide and the length desired, posistioning the rivets close to one edge. Applying this riveted strip to where a Z-bar was required, plus a follow up of a 0.020" X 0.020" evergreen strip hugging the edge furtherest from the rivet line gave the classic riveted Z-bar which technique is still being used to this date.

I experimented on a 52' CN gondola which used z-bars over steel sides, a somewhat rare use of Z-bars as stamped steel posts are far more common in these instances.

Using the principle Todd mentioned, a steady pressure #11 blade pulled down the steel side at the location where the riveted line would be found left a "furrow", much like a farmer's plowed field. I followed up with passing a flat chisel blade's backside and drawn backwards, knocking only ONE raised "furrow" (the one which would be facing towards the rivets) leaving the other furrow intact. Next a trip to the rivet embosser and running a length of rivets close to the surviving furrow. The application of the 0.020 X 0.030 evergreen strip completed the "Z-bar. Now the raised furrow emulated the edge of the flat portion of the steel Z-bar, but with a closer to 3/8" scale edge. I do believe that Frank Hodina also used this technique for at least one Sunshine car sometime later, which goes to show interesting techniques arrive independently many times over.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



From: "sullivant41@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 4:12 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Monon #37 w/Archer Surface Details Update

 
Nice work, Bill.  Nothing like close-up photos to put a model under the microscope!

The Archer weld lines are a bit wavy, which you have recognized in previous posts.  Many years ago, Jim Eager taught me an alternate way of doing weld lines when I was reworking the sides of a Robins Rails 50ft PS-1 model (the only 50ft PS-1 on the market at the time).  Jim used a No. 11 Xacto blade to score each weld line on the car side, then went over each weld line with the back of a No. 17 blade.  The secret is that the No. 11 blade creates a shallow groove with small ridges of plastic on both sides of the groove.  The No. 17 blade flattens these ridges and closes them over the groove, resulting in a 'weld' line.  The key to success is knowing how much pressure to apply to each of the blade movements.  Experimenting on a scrap plastic boxcar body before working on your super detailed model is recommended.

Todd Sullivan



Re: Monon #37 w/Archer Surface Details Update

Todd Sullivan
 

Nice work, Bill.  Nothing like close-up photos to put a model under the microscope!

The Archer weld lines are a bit wavy, which you have recognized in previous posts.  Many years ago, Jim Eager taught me an alternate way of doing weld lines when I was reworking the sides of a Robins Rails 50ft PS-1 model (the only 50ft PS-1 on the market at the time).  Jim used a No. 11 Xacto blade to score each weld line on the car side, then went over each weld line with the back of a No. 17 blade.  The secret is that the No. 11 blade creates a shallow groove with small ridges of plastic on both sides of the groove.  The No. 17 blade flattens these ridges and closes them over the groove, resulting in a 'weld' line.  The key to success is knowing how much pressure to apply to each of the blade movements.  Experimenting on a scrap plastic boxcar body before working on your super detailed model is recommended.

Todd Sullivan


Monon #37 w/Archer Surface Details Update

Bill Welch
 

Before CCB's Prototype Rails I posted a link with photos showing how I have used Archer Surface Detail decals to model a welded boxcar. This is an update.


Here is the C&BT Car Shops body as 1947 Built Monon #37 in Badger’s “Stynylrez” Acrylic Polyurethane primer and the scratch built ladders attached. The photos show the Athearn rivet detail I added to the ends. As a reminder the Weld Lines are Archer’s Aircraft Panels Lines. The rivets on the ends of the roof and very ends of the side are Archer Rivets. The primer was applied at about 20-PSI w/my Badger 105 and .75mm needle/tip combo.

 

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/t749sxg6p0l4qky/AACUf702qurvzxn3W_FZ7xdLa?dl=0


Bill Welch


Re: UTLX X-3 Photos

golden1014
 

Hi Dave,

When I saw the car I was convinced it was the Tichy car in 1:1, but Frank Hodina told me it was an X-3.  I posted every photo that I took.  

I was curious about the trucks too.  I need to do more research.  I suppose most old cars didn't survive in as-built condition through the 60s and 70s so they are all hybrids of some sort.  An exception is the CofG HS flat car--it is in spectacular as built condition, rust, corrosion and all.  

FYI there is also a B&LE 1937-type car there too, painted for PRR.  Very curious.

John Golden
Albersbach, Germany




Brian Carlson Can you contact me

Paul Catapano
 

 
Paul Catapano
World War One Centenary


Re: Clever Airbrush Accessory

Douglas Harding
 

Bill I understand, I find the trigger pad to enhance my experience. If the Triple Coated is better…

 

I missed THE Beach as well. But finances and some long awaited surgery done this morning kept me from traveling. Besides is was zero yesterday morning here in Iowa, who would want to miss that?

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Elden, they’re too wide to be laths.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 04, 2017 7:50 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [EXTERNAL] Re: [STMFC] More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site





Mark;

My first thought was that they were lathe boards for application of plaster to walls in homes of that era. Just a guess, but I saw a lot that looked like that back when I worked on houses.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 03, 2017 5:14 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [STMFC] More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site



Thanks for sharing. There sure is a lot of lumber around that single XL.

Interesting scene the boards look to be about 4-5 long any ideas on their use?


Mark P Stamm
Mark at Euphoriatt dot Com

Sent from my mobile device

On Jan 3, 2017, at 3:51 PM, rwitt_2000@... <mailto:rwitt_2000@...> [STMFC] <STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC@...> > wrote:





A PRR 27501 class XL

Bob Witt

Blockedhttp://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-01-03-17/X1203.jpg














[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Clever Airbrush Accessory

Bill Welch
 

I agree Doug. However I replaced my 155 w/Badger's Trigger w/their new Triple Coated slicker trigger (#50-019HR). It has a larger finger grip and the trigger pad is too small.

We really missed you at THE Beach!

Bill Welch


Re: Clever Airbrush Accessory

Douglas Harding
 

It reminds me of the trigger pad sold by Badger Airbrush Co. I’ve had one on my Badger Anthem 155 for years. It is a soft, sticky, black rubber pad with small ribs that slips over the metal trigger. I find that with it my finger is less likely to slip, esp when wet, giving me greater control with the dual action airbrush. It is part 51-087, sells for about $3.10.

 

This link for Badger parts is via Badger’s website: http://webairbrushes.com/

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: More Photos from the Erie Lackawanna web site

Dave Nelson
 

Shiplap!

Jo Jo Gaines' favorite wood.

But IIRC that wood in the photo looked to be about 4 feet long. I rather think crates was the intended result.

Dave Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 04, 2017 4:50 AM
Mark;

My first thought was that they were lathe boards for application of plaster to walls in homes of that era. Just a guess, but I saw a lot that looked like that back when I worked on houses.

Elden Gatwood


Re: Clever Airbrush Accessory

Bill Welch
 

Actually Charley, he states in the first 30 seconds what the purpose is.

Bill Welch


Re: Clever Airbrush Accessory

Charles
 

So has anybody actually used it? The guy in the "review" video didn't. How is it supposed to make airbrushing better? Again, the guy in the review didn't say what its purpose was (or maybe he did — I skipped through some it when he was talking a lot and not saying anything). To me, this looks like just something unneccessary, like those dopey trigger things that fit onto a spray can to make it seem like a spray gun.

Charley Hepperle



From: "fgexbill@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, January 9, 2017 10:06 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Clever Airbrush Accessory

 
Here is the link to clever accessory:TriggerStix
Bill Welch



Re: UTLX X-3 Photos

Fred_Swa@...
 

On the Steam Era Freight Cars sight Steve Hile posted photos of an X-3 
I believe they were in relation to the Virtual Moder's Yahoo Group's build of Sunshine's X-3.  On that group there is quite a bit of information on building the model and the prototype. https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/virtualmodelers/conversations/messageshttps://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/virtualmodelers/conversations/messages
The tankcar was the first build on this site.

 

Fred Swanson

 




---In STMFC@..., <sartherdj@...> wrote :

John,  

Nice photos. Thanks for sharing them.  It is always nice to see photos of prototype equipment details taken by modelers for building a scale model.  Will the model you build be in HO scale or O-Scale P:48?

Later,  Dave Sarther   Tucson, AZ


-----Original Message-----
From: John Golden golden1014@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: stmfc <stmfc@...>
Sent: Mon, Jan 9, 2017 4:51 am
Subject: [STMFC] UTLX X-3 Photos

 
Gents,
 
FWIW, I have a bunch of X-3 photos on my blog at https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/2016/11/10/utlx-x-3/ including photos of the brake gear installation.  This car is "preserved" at the Dennison, Ohio, railroad museum.
 
John

John Golden
Albersbach, DE

https://railroadprototypemodeler.wordpress.com/


Clever Airbrush Accessory

Bill Welch
 

Here is the link to clever accessory:TriggerStix

Bill Welch


Using Krystal Klear for Windows or as an Adhesive

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

When using KK for windows ...

KK does not normally dry in less than 4 to as much as 24
hours. It will usually skin over in about an hour. I normally
set the model aside for 12 to 24 hours.
After you close the space up with the toothpick draw the
toothpick out very slowly - do other windows on the same
side of the model - and set it down with the window side UP.
This will create a window that is all one thickness.
The thickness of the window frame determines the
thickness of the KK window. If you are doing a blue box
Athearn caboose they will be "coke bottle thick" - and
you will have to apply KK more than once in order to
get it to have a flat appearance. You can add more KK
layers on top of layers that aren't fully dry ... but if they
haven't at least fully skinned over you will have to wait
before applying a following layer. Multiple layers can
take 2 or more -days- to dry fully.
KK wants to/will almost always form a fillet at any
corner ... it will not lay flat against an edge that is 90
degrees from the face. This can/will create a 'wrong'
look. An additional layer that fills the space will
correct this - be careful about not getting too much
across the window face because it can also have a
curl down at the edges which looks just as 'wrong'.
Using KK for windows on painted brass models is
surprisingly easy/effective. The walls of brass
models are thin and it only takes one time to get
a window that looks darn good.
KK will never look as transparent/flat as using
some clear plastic (acetate or styrene) or actual.
And it won't have that mirror like aspect to the
surface that reflects the surroundings. But it
still can be used very effectively ... and most guys
won't notice that you didn't use the good stuff.

Using KK as an adhesive ...

KK makes an -excellent- adhesive and for certain
applications it is unsurpassed. Yes, it has a -very-
slow drying time ... but that can be an asset as well
as an issue.
You have to 'support' the two parts in such a way
that they don't move while the KK dries and sometimes
that is difficult.
Because it forms a fillet - KK is much stronger for
joining parts that need it. Such as gluing the cab
shades on an HO diesel.
Because KK dries -clear- you can use it on painted
models. Often, especially if you use care in how
much KK you use, any 'extra' amount of KK will be
invisible ... or at most form a clear puddle that
resembles "ice".
KK accepts all types of paint (they all stick to it).
Be doubly certain it is fully dry before you paint
over it. I use 48 hours as my rule of thumb for
how long after applying KK that I will paint it.
KK can form an adhoc "bracket" ... for instance
you can apply it up and over the edges of a lead
weight and when it is dry it will hold the lead in
place 'for ever'.

KK does not get soft due to humidity - but if you
apply a drop of water on it and set it aside for at
least an hour (some times as long as 2 or even 4)
it will soften and the two parts previously glued
to each other can be separated. With enough
time and reapplication of KK its former presence
on a part(s) can be undetectable.

I believe that KK is "some form of white glue". I
don't know what Microscale adds to it. I don't
really care. I consider it to be "worth it".
Yes, you can add some water to a bottle of KK
and recover its previous consistency if you left
it open by accident. How much? I just guess.
(Start small and add more if not enough?)

No, KK is not my "go to" product for windows or as an
adhesive ... it is "one of the options that I consider".
I do find I use it "once in every week when I'm doing
any modeling on 4 or more days of that week" ... YMMV.
- Jim B.

51741 - 51760 of 198607