Date   

Re: NYC Covered Hoppers

joel norman <mec-bml@...>
 

ERIE Bilt(or re bilt )a class of HT cars with covers for the cement loadings in eastern Penna along with HT cars for the LHR and LNE pre WW-1 and after....
Joel Norman


On Wednesday, June 1, 2016 3:03 PM, "Armand Premo armprem@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I accept your word totally.While going over some wheel reports I discovered this.Then Ben,how about some ERDX reefers? Armand Premo
--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 6/1/16, Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC] wrote:

Subject: Re: [STMFC] NYC Covered Hoppers
To: "STMFC@..." <STMFC@...>
Date: Wednesday, June 1, 2016, 3:43 PM


 









Armand
Premo wrote:
"Other than my typo, what
is odd about it Ben?"

Go back and read my post.  My point is there
just weren't many early NYCS covered hoppers.  311 cars
in the greater NYCS car fleet isn't even a drop in the
bucket.

"Checking
wheel reports I found that Rutland railroaders used
"H" for all hoppers including covered
hoppers."

You have to
do the legwork to break down what that data is telling
you.  Here's the breakdown for NYCS hoppers from those
wheel reports in your collection that I was able to
analyze:

Total NYCS
Hoppers: 229 cars

Breakdown
by road:
B&A  Open Hoppers - 1 
Covered Hoppers - 0
NYC  Open Hoppers -
123  Covered Hoppers - 16
P&LE  Open
Hoppers - 53  Covered Hoppers - 0
PMcK&Y  Open Hoppers - 56  Covered
Hoppers - 0

So, that makes
16 covered hoppers out of 229 hopper cars, or 6.9% of the
total number of NYCS hopper cars.  Unless you have a bunch
of wheel reports of trains with huge numbers of covered
hoppers, I don't see this average changing much.

"Are
there any, many, kits for these cars?"

Here's
the breakdown of the 16 NYC covered hopper cars:

Lot
671-H, built 1939http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-671.jpghttp://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/nyc-880523.jpgNYC
880527, NYC 880628
These
were the first purpose-built NYCS covered hoppers - that was
an error in my previous post.
Lot
680-H, built 1940http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-680.jpghttp://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/nyc-881032.jpg 
NYC 880882, NYC 880920, NYC 881137, NYC
881153
Lot
747-H, built 1946, clearance diagram and photo linked in
previous post  
NYC 881211, NYC 881285,
NYC 881285, NYC 881438, NYC 881524, NYC 881583, NYC 881642,
NYC 881833, NYC 881881
Lot
783-H, built 1949http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-783.jpgNYC
881962
As
for models of these cars, only the lot 747-H cars are
available in kit form in HO scale (Funaro), but at least
they're the most common cars (9 of 16).  The earlier
conversions noted in my previous post can be kitbashed from
your choice of USRA twin model or Westerfield USRA
triple.
Again,
if you've got any meaningful data refuting this
(besides waiving stacks of wheel reports that haven't
been analyzed), I'd be happy to see it.

Ben
Hom









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Re: NYC Covered Hoppers

Armand Premo
 

I accept your word totally.While going over some wheel reports I discovered this.Then Ben,how about some ERDX reefers? Armand Premo
--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 6/1/16, Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [STMFC] NYC Covered Hoppers
To: "STMFC@..." <STMFC@...>
Date: Wednesday, June 1, 2016, 3:43 PM


 









Armand
Premo wrote:
"Other than my typo, what
is odd about it Ben?"

Go back and read my post.  My point is there
just weren't many early NYCS covered hoppers.  311 cars
in the greater NYCS car fleet isn't even a drop in the
bucket.

"Checking
wheel reports I found that Rutland railroaders used
"H" for all hoppers including covered
hoppers."

You have to
do the legwork to break down what that data is telling
you.  Here's the breakdown for NYCS hoppers from those
wheel reports in your collection that I was able to
analyze:

Total NYCS
Hoppers: 229 cars

Breakdown
by road:
B&A  Open Hoppers - 1 
Covered Hoppers - 0
NYC  Open Hoppers -
123  Covered Hoppers - 16
P&LE  Open
Hoppers - 53  Covered Hoppers - 0
PMcK&Y  Open Hoppers - 56  Covered
Hoppers - 0

So, that makes
16 covered hoppers out of 229 hopper cars, or 6.9% of the
total number of NYCS hopper cars.  Unless you have a bunch
of wheel reports of trains with huge numbers of covered
hoppers, I don't see this average changing much.

"Are
there any, many, kits for these cars?"

Here's
the breakdown of the 16 NYC covered hopper cars:

Lot
671-H, built 1939http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-671.jpghttp://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/nyc-880523.jpgNYC
880527, NYC 880628
These
were the first purpose-built NYCS covered hoppers - that was
an error in my previous post.
Lot
680-H, built 1940http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-680.jpghttp://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/nyc-881032.jpg 
NYC 880882, NYC 880920, NYC 881137, NYC
881153
Lot
747-H, built 1946, clearance diagram and photo linked in
previous post  
NYC 881211, NYC 881285,
NYC 881285, NYC 881438, NYC 881524, NYC 881583, NYC 881642,
NYC 881833, NYC 881881
Lot
783-H, built 1949http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-783.jpgNYC
881962
As
for models of these cars, only the lot 747-H cars are
available in kit form in HO scale (Funaro), but at least
they're the most common cars (9 of 16).  The earlier
conversions noted in my previous post can be kitbashed from
your choice of USRA twin model or Westerfield USRA
triple.
Again,
if you've got any meaningful data refuting this
(besides waiving stacks of wheel reports that haven't
been analyzed), I'd be happy to see it.

Ben
Hom









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Re: NYC Covered Hoppers

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Armand,

How early? Ben has sort of  . . . uh . . . covered this. (Ducking for cover!) Or are you thinking post-WWII? Eastern Car Works used to offer an NYC kit, an Enterprise design IIRC. It was quite different from the AC&F-style we are so familiar with. I had one of these, but never built it because I couldn't justify it on my then Sacramento Northern. Mine is long gone, but I bet you could locate a few on eBay.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 6/1/16 12:38 PM, armprem@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

 Conspicious by their absence are models of  earlier NYC covered hoppers.Armand Premo



Re: NYC Covered Hoppers

Benjamin Hom
 

Armand Premo wrote:
"Other than my typo, what is odd about it Ben?"

Go back and read my post.  My point is there just weren't many early NYCS covered hoppers.  311 cars in the greater NYCS car fleet isn't even a drop in the bucket.

"Checking wheel reports I found that Rutland railroaders used "H" for all hoppers including covered hoppers."

You have to do the legwork to break down what that data is telling you.  Here's the breakdown for NYCS hoppers from those wheel reports in your collection that I was able to analyze:

Total NYCS Hoppers: 229 cars

Breakdown by road:
B&A  Open Hoppers - 1  Covered Hoppers - 0
NYC  Open Hoppers - 123  Covered Hoppers - 16
P&LE  Open Hoppers - 53  Covered Hoppers - 0
PMcK&Y  Open Hoppers - 56  Covered Hoppers - 0

So, that makes 16 covered hoppers out of 229 hopper cars, or 6.9% of the total number of NYCS hopper cars.  Unless you have a bunch of wheel reports of trains with huge numbers of covered hoppers, I don't see this average changing much.

"Are there any, many, kits for these cars?"

Here's the breakdown of the 16 NYC covered hopper cars:

Lot 671-H, built 1939
NYC 880527, NYC 880628

These were the first purpose-built NYCS covered hoppers - that was an error in my previous post.

Lot 680-H, built 1940
http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/nyc-881032.jpg 
NYC 880882, NYC 880920, NYC 881137, NYC 881153

Lot 747-H, built 1946, clearance diagram and photo linked in previous post  
NYC 881211, NYC 881285, NYC 881285, NYC 881438, NYC 881524, NYC 881583, NYC 881642, NYC 881833, NYC 881881

Lot 783-H, built 1949
NYC 881962

As for models of these cars, only the lot 747-H cars are available in kit form in HO scale (Funaro), but at least they're the most common cars (9 of 16).  The earlier conversions noted in my previous post can be kitbashed from your choice of USRA twin model or Westerfield USRA triple.

Again, if you've got any meaningful data refuting this (besides waiving stacks of wheel reports that haven't been analyzed), I'd be happy to see it.


Ben Hom


Re: NYC Covered Hoppers

Armand Premo
 

Other than my typo,what is odd about it Ben?Checking wheel reports I found that Rutland railroders used "H" for all hoppers including covered hoppers.Are there any,many,kits for these cars? Armand Premo--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 6/1/16, Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [STMFC] NYC Covered Hoppers
To: "STMFC@..." <STMFC@...>
Date: Wednesday, June 1, 2016, 2:34 PM


 









Armand
Premo wrote:
"Conspicuous by their
absence are models of earlier NYC covered
hoppers."

This is an
odd statement - of all the common NYCS freight car
models needed by transition-era modelers, early covered
hoppers don't crack the top ten.

I'm not sure why you're singling out
the NYC as the same statement applies to any other North
American railroad.  Very few early covered hoppers were
purpose built as covered hoppers, but were converted from
open hopper cars for specialized service.  In the case of
the NYCS, the earliest covered hoppers were converted
from 6 Lot 411-H (MCRR 11200-11699) USRA twin hoppers in
1929 (MCRR 11222, 11240, 11247, 11262, 11335, 11375, 11409,
11465, 11495), followed by 65 Lot 407-H (P&LE
52000-52988) USRA twin hoppers to Lot 635-H
(P&LE 7000-7064) in 1935.http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-635.jpg
The
final conversions before NYCS were 240 USRA triple hoppers
from five different lots to Lot 720-H (NYC 882000-882239) bauxite
service cars in 1942.http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-720.jpg
The
first purpose built NYCS covered hoppers were built in 1946
(Lot 747-H, NYC 881200-881949, 2000 cars) and are
available in HO scale from Funaro.http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-747.jpghttp://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/nyc-881598.jpghttp://www.fandckits.com/HOFreight/6610.html
Sorry
- having trouble losing sleep over the lack of models of 311
cars.

Ben Hom










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Re: NYC Covered Hoppers

Benjamin Hom
 

Armand Premo wrote:
"Conspicuous by their absence are models of earlier NYC covered hoppers."

This is an odd statement - of all the common NYCS freight car models needed by transition-era modelers, early covered hoppers don't crack the top ten.

I'm not sure why you're singling out the NYC as the same statement applies to any other North American railroad.  Very few early covered hoppers were purpose built as covered hoppers, but were converted from open hopper cars for specialized service.  In the case of the NYCS, the earliest covered hoppers were converted from 6 Lot 411-H (MCRR 11200-11699) USRA twin hoppers in 1929 (MCRR 11222, 11240, 11247, 11262, 11335, 11375, 11409, 11465, 11495), followed by 65 Lot 407-H (P&LE 52000-52988) USRA twin hoppers to Lot 635-H (P&LE 7000-7064) in 1935.

The final conversions before NYCS were 240 USRA triple hoppers from five different lots to Lot 720-H (NYC 882000-882239) bauxite service cars in 1942.

The first purpose built NYCS covered hoppers were built in 1946 (Lot 747-H, NYC 881200-881949, 2000 cars) and are available in HO scale from Funaro.

Sorry - having trouble losing sleep over the lack of models of 311 cars.


Ben Hom


Re: MAIN and MTX info at the National Archives

John Barry
 

Jim,

Do you really want the boxes I searched?  I'd think you'd rather have the ones that bore fruit.  Although there are lots of varieties of fruit in that forest of information.  I will post a proper citation once I consolidate my information.  I did get a cart of stuff that was totally non-relevant when I used UD Entry 2 instead of Entry 2.  Two very different record series with overlapping container numbers.  

In a different part of the files, I located the staff work records that led to the adoption of a combined Government Bill of Lading-Government Waybill form in 1943, complete with examples of the form produced and used starting that year.  I think those of us wishing to use more realistic paper work to route our model STMFC would be interested.  That will be a future blog post too.
 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736



From: "bi291@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, June 1, 2016 9:37 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: MAIN and MTX info at the National Archives

 
John; a very interesting posting.  What years were you searching for your MAIN info?  Can you pass on the box numbers within RG 336 that you searched ?
Thanks.  (I plan to visit in the near future looking for MAIN info now that I'm aware it exists!)
Jim Murrie



Re: plastic solvent cements - again

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 5/31/2016 11:17 PM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] wrote:
simple acrylic stand for holding nail polish bottles at an angle

    Six dollars on ebay and $10 on Amazon.  I just ordered the ebay one.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


NYC Covered Hoppers

Armand Premo
 

 Conspicious by their absence are models of  earlier NYC covered hoppers.Armand Premo


Re: MAIN and MTX info at the National Archives

Paul Krueger
 

We have a box of documents that has quite a bit of material about MAIN trains operating on the MILW Coast Division during the demobilzation period following the end of WWII. Some of the documents show the routing to offline destinations and generalized consist information.

Contact me off list if you would like us to dig into it for you. We are not always fast, but we are free.

Paul

Paul Krueger
Secretary
Cascade Rail Foundation
"Remembering the Milwaukee Road in Washington"
www.milwelectric.org


Re: MAIN and MTX info at the National Archives

james murrie
 

John; a very interesting posting.  What years were you searching for your MAIN info?  Can you pass on the box numbers within RG 336 that you searched ?
Thanks.  (I plan to visit in the near future looking for MAIN info now that I'm aware it exists!)
Jim Murrie


Re: Freight Commodity Statistics

earlyrail
 

What does "NOS" stand for in some of the summary table titles?
____
Mark Mathu

Not otherwise Specified

Howard Garner


Re: Freight Commodity Statistics

Mark Mathu
 

What does "NOS" stand for in some of the summary table titles?
____
Mark Mathu


---In STMFC@..., <cnw1045@...> wrote :

Good evening all,


I created a new folder in the files area for transcribed ICC freight commodity statistics.  The ICC published these statistics yearly based on information filed by each Class 1 Carrier.  For each year, for each Class 1 Carrier, the number of tons of freight originated on line and terminated on line, originated on line and interchanged with other carriers, originated off line and terminated on line, and originated off line and interchanged with other carriers are listed.  I am simply typing these numbers into individual Excel spreadsheets (one for each commodity class) and thought this would be a good place to archive this data for interested researchers (although numerous, these files are very small compared to the total amount of file space).  


40' PS-1 model roundup

Mark Mathu
 

I'm working on a short piece for my RR historical society on the GBW's 40'
PS-1 boxcar fleet. I'd like to at least touch on some of the available
commercial model choices in various scales at the end of the article. Being
an HO scale modeler, I have and am familiar with the Intermountain / Kadee /
Accurail / Walthers versions of these cars, but there are others and other
scales which I am less familiar with. Can anyone -- or multiple people --
give a brief (1 - 3 sentences) review in general terms of their thoughts on
how well these models match the 40' PS-1 prototypes? I'd appreciate
comments on specific production eras the models are most appropriate for,
and any shortcomings the model may have -- height, width, just poor tooling.
No need to be concerned about how well they match specific GBW car series, I
can combine the comments with past messages on the [STMFC] list and sort
that out.

Obviously if a modeler is a nit-picker they'd research more detail than the
simple info I'd be laying out. But I'd like to at least touch on some of
the model available for a casual modeler who wants to put a GBW PS-1 on the
layout, and explain why (or why not) a specific model would be a good choice
for certain car series. Their predominant car was GBW 700-899 built 1950
with 6' Superior doors, but they also had smaller numbers of some
later-production 9' door cars and even some second hand early-production
cars. I have Ed Kaminski's book on PS freight cars.


Here's the 40' PS-1 scale models I've identified:


HO Kadee - to me it's the gold standard. 1950+ body style. They seem to
get everything right for specific models. (They are now available in kits,
and they are producing a modernized 50' PS-1 so hopefully they'll apply that
to the 40' PS-1 at some point in the future. )


HO Intermountain - also pretty good. 1954+ body style with wide bolster
tabs. Available in 6', 7', 8' doors (oh how I wish they had 9' doors!).


HO Accurail - pre 1950 car body. The bolster tabs indicate a 1954+ body
style, and the eight foot door of the model wasn't produced until 1951.


HO Front Range / McKean -


HO Walthers Mainline - pre 1950 car body. The see-through running board on
this car is really good (I was quite surprised for a RTR car with cast-on
details), even the cast-on grab irons and ladders are pretty nice. The left
side car step is an odd shape.


HO AHM / Model Power / Con-Cor - probably the best thing on this model was
the diamond-panel PS door.


HO Cannonball Car Shops / Kurtz Kraft -


O Weaver -


O Atlas -


O MTH -


N Atlas - It sounds like they set a new standard for N scale boxcars when
they released this in 2013.


N Train-Miniature - Seems like it doesn't compare to the Atlas model, but
since this has been around for decades they are literally thousands of these
rolling on model layouts right now.


Others? Did anyone produce a modernized version of a 40' PS-1 with cut-down
ladders?

__________
Mark Mathu
Whitefish Bay, Wis.


Re: plastic solvent cements - again

thecitrusbelt@...
 

In a tool clinic years ago I was introduced to a simple acrylic stand for holding nail polish bottles at an angle. The clinician recommended this for round solvent bottles so I manned-up and walked into a beauty supply store and bought one. It is perfect for Plastruct bottles and I have used mine for years.

 

I could not find a similar stand illustrated on the Internet but I did find something that might be even better. Here is a link to an image of the stand:

 

http://www.bookofjoe.com/images/2008/07/08/huyuy_2.jpg

 

It has an adjustable neck and arm.

 

Here is a link to the source:

 

https://www.thehunt.com/finds/kmBxkb-bookofjoe--third-hand-nail-polish-bottle-holder?child_note=kxSxWe

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: plastic solvent cements - again

midrly
 

I can and have knocked over the old square Testor's bottles.  

The solution for me was to cut a 4" square of 1/4 acrylic, gluing a 2" long piece of 1 1/2" ABS pipe to it vertically in the centre.  The round Testor's bottle drops right in, as do Floquil, etc. bottles.

Even I have trouble knocking this over now.

Steve Lucas 


Re: plastic solvent cements - again

frograbbit602
 

Bill Welch wrote:
' AMEN, AMEN, AMEN"
'Anyone have any of the old square squat jars they want to pass on?"

No, too valuable, even if bottle brushes attached to cap have dissolved due to age. My empties now contain items such as MEK, MEK goop, and Zip Kicker.
Lester Breuer


Micro Engineering HO Code 55 Flextrack Now Available

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

I realize this isn’t strictly about freight cars (OK, freight car run on track, right?), but I just found out that Micro Engineering has fixed the molds and is just now starting to deliver HO code 55 flextrack. It’s been out of production for six years, so there is probably pent-up demand, and I’d advise ordering what you need ASAP. I just placed an order directly with Micro Engineering, but Walthers and other dealers will be getting inventory soon. It’s available in both weathered and unweathered six packs.

 

Nelson Moyer


Plastic solvent cements - try Tamiya

Jim King
 

I use Tamiya Extra Thin Cement.  Green cap in a square glass bottle, available at Hobbytown USA.  It stays liquid longer than lacquer thinner which is what I’ve used for several years.

 

Jim King

(828) 777-5619

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

 


Working with Future floor finish

Eric Hansmann
 

Have you been wondering about using Future floor wax as a gloss coat on your models? The Resin Car Works blog has a feature that may answer some of your questions about this product. Check it out.

http://blog.resincarworks.com/working-with-future/

 

Eric Hansmann

RCW web guy

 

55881 - 55900 of 198561