Date   

new Resin Car Works kit

Eric Hansmann
 

It’s here!

Resin Car Works is ready to ship their second freight car kit. The latest is a common Illinois Central coal hopper. The model reflects an Enterprise design, 33-foot, offset-side, twin hopper. From 1937 to 1949, 12,000 of these offset-side twin hoppers were manufactured for the Illinois Central by a variety of builders, including the railroad itself.

These are fleet builder kits with cast on grab irons to minimize the time and effort to get these models into service on your railroad. The kits are $36, plus shipping. Trucks and couplers are not included. A United States Army version is also available. More details can be found at the Resin Car Works website.

http://resincarworks.com/kits.htm

 

Eric Hansmann

RCW web guy

 

 


Re: Covered Hoppers - for Cement

Clark Propst
 

Watched some older movies taken of the MN&S yesterday at the ‘retreat’. One train switching a concrete block plant had 2 RI and 1 Missabe CH. The RI probably came from Mason City Iowa and the Missabe from Duluth about equal distances N-S from the Twin Cities.
 
Believe it or not cement required clean cars. So CHs would arrive empty and leave loaded. Not to say cars couldn’t change assignments after thorough cleaning inside.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Price of freight cars these days

al whitecar
 

What I have seen on Ebay is that some people put extremely excessive pricing for "but it now" in lieu of bidding. Most of the time the item sits on Ebay for long period of time. My guess is that these people thinks the market is still at those high prices that has long significantly dropped due to the economy.
Al Whitecar


On Sunday, February 28, 2016 10:09 AM, "'Dave Nelson' Lake_Muskoka@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Almost everything is listed at or above $500.  My hunch is whoever entered the price from some list assumed a $ was a 5.
 
Dave Nelson
 
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2016 12:55 AM
Now I know that Life Like Proto 2000 are good cars but whew!!
I thought this was a typing error but the same seller has a lot of stuff at the same prices.   What am I missing.
 



Re: Cast resin HO Type 30 tanks available again

Charlie Vlk
 

Dennis-

At least it isn’t Horribly Oversized!!!

I understand the motivations of somebody to subject themselves to the trials and tribulations of becoming involved in a “frontier scale” where not much is commercially available….I got into N Scale with a stick of Peco “OOO” flex and a rubber-band powered Lone Star 0-8-0 set from Montgomery Wards back in 1964.   Even though I still am on the lookout for “dimestore” stuff that works for N the scale has progressed to the point where one can moan about the latest diesel doesn’t come in the EXACT phase that one would like to have for their favorite railroad…and will wait for it to (most likely) be released.   I don’t miss the days of trying to cobble up equipment but it was fun at the time having to kitbash.

With 3D CAD and Rapid Prototyping TT seems to be getting a bunch of stuff that would otherwise be impossible to justify using hard tooling.  Hal Joyce would be proud!!

Charlie Vlk



---In STMFC@..., Dennis Storzek wrote :

'Cause it's bigger than Nearsighted scale, and easier to see the detail?

Dennis


Re: Covered Hoppers - for Cement

Edward
 

The movement of bulk cement by rail grew out of highway and other construction work being done in the 1930s. The first cars for this material, which had to be kept dry in transit, were usually open top hoppers fitted with roofs, hatches and specially designed hopper outlets.

B&O converted 25  Class N-13 open hoppers this way in 1932, creating the N-25 class of 50 ton steel cement hopper cars. Further refinements were made in 1933 with one-off N-25 a and N-25b cars, addressing issues related to slope sheet and hopper discharge designs.

Meanwhile, more bulk cement hauling cars were needed. So B&O converted 58 M-24 single sheathed  USRA boxcars into cement hopper/boxcars in 1933. These cars had steel, dual hoppers built inside, with roof hatches and outlet hoppers for each. The lading did not cover the door area. 

They were Class M-24a and M-24b. A model of such a car is in the Photos section, O Scale Freight Cars album. In the 1930s, B&O was involved in a number of system wide grade crossing elimination projects, with overpasses, retaining wall and elevated railroad viaducts, some extending well over a mile in length.

B&O's next effort was a one-off N-31 class 50 ton "Wagon top" cement car in 1935. It was a prototype of sorts for 1940 class N-34 70 ton "Wagon top" covered hoppers for cement service, of which only 200 were built. 
Many of these unique cars were in service to the glass industry and rarely if ever got off B&O rails.  Several were also employed hauling dry materials for the oil drilling industry and could be found at times in Louisiana and Texas.  Others of course carried bulk cement. It was important that cars assigned to a specific industry were kept in that service, to avoid possible contamination of the lading.

In 1941, B&O got 150 70 ton cement cars built by the Greenville Steel Car Co, and in 1946 350 more from American Car & Foundry. More such cars would follow in the WW II years from various  builders, including  Pullman's PS-2  in the mid 1950s.

By this time the 'cement car' designation was dropped in favor of 'covered' hopper, hauling dry bulk materials for many other industries.

Ed Bommer  





B&O fielded a small fleet of cement hoppers rebuilt from class M-24 boxcars in the mid-1930s.
Most worked out of Pittsburgh, carrying cement to various large scale construction projects.

Some B&O projects using these cars were concerned with grade crossing elimination work, having bridges, viaducts and retaining walls built in re-enforced concrete.

Such projects were funded with B&O, state and federal funds and provided work during the Great Depression.
A model of a B&O M-24a cement hopper/boxcar, built from an O scale Chooch USRA double sheathed box car kit, is shown in the Photos Section's O Scale Freight Cars album. They were in service into the post WW II years.

Much better known, but far scarcer are the 70 ton B&O 'wagon top' covered hoppers of the N-34 class, also intended for cement service. Only 200 were built in 1940. Most were in dedicated service for the glass industry and rarely got off B&O lines. Several were in assigned service hauling dry materials for the oil drilling industry and could sometimes be found off-line in Louisiana and Texas. B&O built one 50 ton wagon top covered hopper in 1935, class N-31. It was a prototype of sorts for the later N-34 class.

 


Re: Covered Hoppers - for Cement

Brad Smith
 

Bagged cement was sold at lumber yards for contractors and home improvers.  Like making a side walk or driveway.  Was still sold at the end of the STMF period.
 
In Rhode Island, where I grew up, I saw a lot of LNE cement hoppers, but there were several cement mines on the LNE.  Much cement for the US came from Michigan.  Probably more can be found on the location of cement mines on the Web.
 
The cement hoppers were for large concrete providers.  You know, the guys that use the transit mixers.  In my town, the concrete company was located nowhere near the railroad.  So on the team track, at the freight house, was a special unloading pit and vertical conveyor to load the cement powder into trucks that would take it to the concrete plant, where it was stored.  I have a background shot of this tower somewhere.  The pit under the track would be covered when not unloading cement.
 
Brad Smith


Covered Hoppers - for Cement

Jim Betz
 

Hello my knowledgeable friends,

My knowledge is less than complete about the topic "covered hoppers
in cement service. It seems like every time I learn one part of this
type of service - it only brings up new questions ...

I know that the GN first started experimenting with 70t covered
hoppers for this service very soon after WWII ('46) and then did
fairly large orders of them in '48 and '49.
I also understand that cement service was more of a"regional
thing" than a trans con service - because there were/are cement
plants in almost every region of the country - and cement is a
fairly heavy commodity. And it is often used for big projects such
as the building of a dam, expansion of the interstates, etc. The
results of these facts were that, for the most part, cement
hoppers tended to be in 'captive service' and it was fairly rare
for them to be interchanged to more than one 'other road'.
Most cement hoppers seem to have a 'range' of "about 200 miles
or so" - which probably directly relates to how far it is between
the various cement producing plants.
The end result was that you see/would see "cuts of cars" that
were usually from one parent road. Such as a cut of GN cars
going to/from a particular cement plant ... and also to/from
a particular consignee.
I've studied as many pics as I can and have the following
questions:

1) What was the 'source' (reason) for seeing a few cars
from other roads in the same cuts of cars? Were
these cars likely to be on a 'permanent short/long
term loan' kind of deal where they stayed in the
same service for a few trips (or many)?

2) I have often seen something like an SSW cement hopper
in a cut of mostly SP cars. I'm guessing that SP was
'maximizing the use of their fleet of hoppers' when
that happened. Correct?

3) Were there definite changes in the cement usage that
occurred - during the STMFC era (i.e. this list) - that explain
some of the 'anomalies' I've seen?

4) Were the hoppers ever used to transport other commodities
- such as sand - TO the cement plants or did they go to the
plants empty and leave the plants loaded.

5) How long after the introduction of cement hoppers was it
before they took over - carrying by far the majority of the
bulk cement hauls? I'm guessing that it was at most a
decade because it has to be a superior (less costly) way
to transport bulk cement.

6) Does any one know what the percentage of bagged cement
in box cars was "by the end of the STMFC era"?

If most/all of this is answered by looking stuff up on the web -
PLEASE point me to the site(s). What I have found are sites
that are focused on the -current- cement industry - and a few
web sites that cover "what happened for the building of the
Grand Coulee Dam" and other such major projects ... but only
for individual projects.
What I did not find is a site that covers "the history of the
cement industry" ... and especially that part of it that involves
the use of covered hoppers.
- Jim B.

P.S. I find it interesting that covered hoppers for cement service
(and a few other special commodities) rolled out so -long-
before the grain industry tumbled to using similarly
designed cars. Go figure ...


ADMIN: Threads plus terminating RE: Price of freight cars these days

Mikebrock
 

As the framers of the US Constitution were apparently aware, it is difficult to write a document that will cover all possibilities. Thus, documents are sometimes generated in a general form which then allows interpretation by the ruling authority [ uh...in the case of the STMFC...me ]. Thus, interpreting the following STMFC rules:

"Replies by members to seller messages MUST be OFF GROUP. Criticism of a manufacturer's business
practices is, however, not within the scope of the group."

And further:

"ALL SUBJECTS OTHER THAN THOSE DIRECTLY ASSOCIATED WITH STEAM ERA FREIGHT
CARS ARE PROHIBITED FROM MEMBER MESSAGES. Thus, all
admin, security, or "policing" functions will be conducted only by myself or
my representatives."

So, the thread:

"RE: [STMFC] Price of freight cars these days"

is now terminated.

BTW, given that there have been more "personal" messages recently than usual, let me suggest you use the following test before you send a message. Is the message associated with several members? If so, the group might well benefit from the message so sending it to the group would be useful. If it applies to only one member...as in, "Thanks, Jim", please send it off group.

Mike Brock
STMFC Boss


Re: Price of freight cars these days

Dave Nelson
 

Almost everything is listed at or above $500.  My hunch is whoever entered the price from some list assumed a $ was a 5.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2016 12:55 AM

Now I know that Life Like Proto 2000 are good cars but whew!!

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Proto-2000-HO-50FT-AUTO-BOX-CARS-2-PCS-UNION-PACIFIC-END-DOORS-/231859480927?hash=item35fbe6e95f:g:ZwgAAOSwpDdVEfxB

I thought this was a typing error but the same seller has a lot of stuff at the same prices.   What am I missing.

 


Re: Price of freight cars these days

Mark Drake <markstation01@...>
 

Oh wow, are we done with this yet? 
Mark L. Drake eBay ID member1108


Re: Price of freight cars these days

Brad Smith
 

Looks like I sold my stuff too cheap.
 
Brad


Re: Modelers Retreat

frograbbit602
 

I as Clark P. had a great time at the Modelers Retreat in Minneapolis.  I had a display table in the display room and spent a good deal of time there sharing ideas with others.  Already looking forward to next year.
Lester Breuer



Re: Price of freight cars these days

A&Y Dave in MD
 

Human error, sentimentality, or greed?

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Feb 28, 2016, at 3:55 AM, rob.mclear3@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Now I know that Life Like Proto 2000 are good cars but whew!!


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Proto-2000-HO-50FT-AUTO-BOX-CARS-2-PCS-UNION-PACIFIC-END-DOORS-/231859480927?hash=item35fbe6e95f:g:ZwgAAOSwpDdVEfxB


I thought this was a typing error but the same seller has a lot of stuff at the same prices.   What am I missing.


Rob McLear.

Aussie.



Re: Price of freight cars these days

Charles Peck
 

Perhaps the "free shipping" includes to the International Space Station.
Chuck Peck in FL

On Sun, Feb 28, 2016 at 3:55 AM, rob.mclear3@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Now I know that Life Like Proto 2000 are good cars but whew!!


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Proto-2000-HO-50FT-AUTO-BOX-CARS-2-PCS-UNION-PACIFIC-END-DOORS-/231859480927?hash=item35fbe6e95f:g:ZwgAAOSwpDdVEfxB


I thought this was a typing error but the same seller has a lot of stuff at the same prices.   What am I missing.


Rob McLear.

Aussie.




Re: Price of freight cars these days

paul.doggett2472 <paul.doggett2472@...>
 

Obviously no idea of correct prices.
Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile

"rob.mclear3@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Now I know that Life Like Proto 2000 are good cars but whew!!


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Proto-2000-HO-50FT-AUTO-BOX-CARS-2-PCS-UNION-PACIFIC-END-DOORS-/231859480927?hash=item35fbe6e95f:g:ZwgAAOSwpDdVEfxB


I thought this was a typing error but the same seller has a lot of stuff at the same prices.   What am I missing.


Rob McLear.

Aussie.



Re: Price of freight cars these days

mwbauers
 

Perhaps he's adjusting for the free shipping?

;^)


Mike Bauers


On Feb 28, 2016, at 2:55 AM, "rob.mclear3@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:


I thought this was a typing error but the same seller has a lot of stuff at the same prices.   What am I missing.


Price of freight cars these days

rob.mclear3@...
 

Now I know that Life Like Proto 2000 are good cars but whew!!


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Proto-2000-HO-50FT-AUTO-BOX-CARS-2-PCS-UNION-PACIFIC-END-DOORS-/231859480927?hash=item35fbe6e95f:g:ZwgAAOSwpDdVEfxB


I thought this was a typing error but the same seller has a lot of stuff at the same prices.   What am I missing.


Rob McLear.

Aussie.



Modelers Retreat

Clark Propst
 

 
Spent the day at the “Modelers Retreat” in Minneapolis. Great time!  Clinics as good as any at RPM meets. Two I attended of interest to this group were Aaron Gjermundson’s talk about national box car percentages with focus on the NP and Bob Heninger’s GN box car talk. Now I’ll do my best impersonation if the late Stan Rydarowicz has attended. “They catered lunch. Pulled pork, cole slaw, chips and a cookie for only 5 BUCKS!”
 
I was told next year meet will be on March 7th...I think?...Make plans.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Cast resin HO Type 30 tanks available again

Tom Madden
 

Brian Chapman asked:,
>
> I've been 2D/3D CAD drawing a TT-scale loco and am nearing
> a point where I'll begin CNC cutting and resin casting parts (casting
> for the first time . . . gulp). May I ask what resin you use for your
> rolling stock projects? (I do have a vacuum setup and will heat cure
> under pressure.) Thanks for the help.

This is a conversation that needs to take place off-list. But as a general comment, anyone just getting started in resin casting should practice with the cheapest resin they can find. You'll waste a lot of resin just learning how to work with it. Sort of the same advice given to those learning to use an air brush - practice on old Blue Box shells, not your $600 brass engine or the superdetailed resin kit that took 40 hours to build.

Look for a room-temperature-cure urethane with a mixed viscosity of around 300 cps, a pot life of 4 to 7 minutes, and a (cured) hardness of 72 to 80 Shore D. Quoted demold times are misleading for our purposes - the ones the manufacturers call out are based on masses of material, like 1" cubes. For such a specimen the exothermic heat generated by the curing reaction is nicely contained within the mass and it will "rock up" in a hurry. But our parts tend to be thinner and they don't cure as quickly. My resin is spec'd at 45 to 60 minutes demold time, and that would be fine if I were casting bricks. But I use 4 hours because I don't want sides, doors and ends that look like they were designed by Salvador Dali.

It's a messy business, and the only way to learn is to jump in and try. Once you get the mechanics down you'll be better equipped to make intelligent decisions about better (and more expensive) resins.

Tom Madden


Re: 36-foot box car data files

destorzek@...
 

56081 - 56100 of 196823