Date   

Re: Crane Underside Detail

Michael Aufderheide
 

Matt,

 

Thanks for the great link.  Great photos, but very few freight cars.  Even the wrecks are passenger trains!  The photographer must have been a Passenger Car List guy.  Here is what I found searching for "railroad":

 

N&W gon:

http://www.miamiconservancy.org/resources/ConstructionPhotos-WM.asp?ID=2926

 

NYC gon:

http://www.miamiconservancy.org/resources/ConstructionPhotos-WM.asp?ID=3526

 

Side dump gondolas:

http://www.miamiconservancy.org/resources/ConstructionPhotos-WM.asp?ID=4077

Mike Aufderheide


Crane Underside Detail

 

I think this is appropriate for this list.

This photo is part of a 4K + photo collection documenting the flood control work in the Miami River Valley in southwest Ohio.

http://www.miamiconservancy.org/resources/ConstructionPhotos-WM.asp?ID=3024

Photo is dated 12/17/1918

Contextual photos are at these links:
http://www.miamiconservancy.org/resources/ConstructionPhotos-WM.asp?ID=3022
http://www.miamiconservancy.org/resources/ConstructionPhotos-WM.asp?ID=3023

Many more can be found from this launch page:
http://www.miamiconservancy.org/resources/index.asp

As can be expected, most cover river and dam related topics, but with the odd rail-related photo (steam and some traction) and great period context photos. If you’re a fan of steam powered shovels and drag lines, you’ll also find the site interesting.

Matt Goodman
Columbus OH


ADMIN: Re: Re: Very sorry guys

Mikebrock
 


Boom!! The sound you read is what is known as a "shot across the bow". Meaning a warning. We all probably sympathize with Oliver's situation and there are no doubt many other undesirable situations that we are confronted with these days but, like the guy long ago who felt compelled to warn the STMFC of hurricanes, the STMFC is not the place to discuss politics...as is stated in the group's rules. So, whether we agree with certain gvt rules, procedures, laws, ect., the STMFC remains NOT the place to discuss them. Fortunately there are many other places on the internet to do just that.
 
Thanks,
Mike Brock
STMFC Owner 


Re: Very sorry guys

Dave Nelson
 

I almost replied the other day…

 

Perhaps they were afraid there was a 1:87.1 scaled Al Qaida terrorist riding the  rods of that NP boxcar ( BTW; your note prompted me to look at your web pages… a very nice looking model).

 

Sigh

They can stop a few bits of resin at the border – how important is that?! -- while there are tens of millions of people here who overstay their VISA (or come having none at all) – all the while others are denied entry and/or residency who, by their skills, should be most welcome to come and stay.  Certain priorities seem bent.

 

Quite sorry to learn you were turned back for lack of a penny label on the box.

 

Dave Nelson

Who remembers the special help we got from Canada in 1979?

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]

Subject: [STMFC] Re: Very sorry guys

 

We have to deal with that sort of crap all the time.

Sorry for your inconvience.

Ed Mines


Re: Very sorry guys

ed_mines
 

We have to deal with that sort of crap all the time.


Sorry for your inconvience.


Ed Mines


Re: One Last X29 Question

Benjamin Hom
 

David Bott asked:
"My focus is on the Southern Railway (and shortline Atlantic & Yadkin) in the Piedmont region of North Carolina in 1934. "Captn" Snow the conductor did me a service in identifying X29's by number that appeared in this area/era through his log books. My question would be: we're any, most, or all of the early '24-25 cars or the later '28 cars converted to AB brakes by 1934?"
No. Do the math. 26,000+ cars across both 1924-25 and 1928-30 were built. Even if the Pennsy decided to do wholesale retrofitting of the X29 fleet starting in 1932, it's highly unlikely that they would have completed even a small fraction of the fleet inn two years, especially given the far-flung travels of general service boxcars. It's far more likely the cars received AB brakes during major shopping - since virtually every car required side sill repairs, AB brake retrofits probably happened at the same time.




Ben Hom


Re: One Last X29 Question

David
 

No, K brakes were legal in interchange until 1953, and many K brake cars weren't converted until after World War 2.

David Thompson


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: One Last X29 Question (I promise. Well, maybe...) (UNCLASSIFIED)

A&Y Dave in MD
 

On Jan 22, 2015, at 2:01 PM, 'Hunter, James R.' jhunter@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
I know how you feel. I wonder if anyone reads my editorials.  But I did read your X29 articles and took your information into account when building my last couple of RC X29s.
Jim Hunter

From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2015 1:30 PM 

Amen, Ben! Sometimes I think no one read any of those articles we wrote.

Elden Gatwood


Given the ubiquity of the X29 and the questions it raises, did the historical society ever consider making this article series free to download as a low res pdf as a way of getting people interested in the Pennsylvania RR, the historical society, and more esoteric topics? Not saying they should, just wondering.

I am often months or years behind in following up on questions or modeling topics. It's hard to remember to visit all the society webs and download the latest for free before it becomes pay-for-CD. I missed a few of the early ACL-SAL Modeler, and just expanded my focus beyond southeastern railroads, such as NYC, PRR, Santa Fe, SP, UP, etc. Given my many projects to do: building, maintaining, researching, etc., the info that is easiest to obtain at the cheapest cost becomes the basis of many modeling decisions. If I read everything of interest first, I would have few models, no layout, and a very different hobby. As it is, I read this and eight other email lists daily, I am subscribed to five or six others with weekly compilations, and some I visit only to search occasionally. I read MRH message boards weekly. I read several subscribed historical society magazines, two or three free modeling publications, as well as visit five or six blogs regularly. I also read and reread the shelves of railroad history books I have purchased and I decipher original prototype materials I collect. I belong to two modular clubs (and maintain the website for one) and several informal train groups. And that's just railroad stuff. I'm almost a Distinguished Toastmaster, having given over 60 speeches, I'm an avid Virginia Tech sports fan, and I have two pre-teen daughters with dance, band, and Girl Scouts. I read a science fiction or American history book a week, and play turn-based electronic war games with some old friends. Oh yes, and I have a job, plus power-of-attorney for my parents due to their health.  It's all about low hanging fruit.

This is not to say that the decisions I make and my activities are typical or that they should be the basis of how information should be made available. It is just an exposition of how I conduct research and thus why I have not read all I should, especially when it is first published or made freely available.

Sent from Dave Bott's iPad



Re: One Last X29 Question

A&Y Dave in MD
 

My focus is on the Southern Railway (and shortline Atlantic & Yadkin) in the Piedmont region of North Carolina in 1934. "Captn" Snow the conductor did me a service in identifying X29's by number that appeared in this area/era through his log books. My question would be: we're any, most, or all of the early '24-25 cars or the later '28 cars converted to AB brakes by 1934?

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott's iPad

On Jan 22, 2015, at 6:03 PM, Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Arved Grass wrote:
"AAR mandated AB brakes in 1933, so I'm quite sure about the 1934 cars being built with AB brakes. Were the 1932 cars built with K brakes? I doubt it. Handwriting was on the wall by then. I believe I've seen that the 1932 cars were built with AB brakes."

You're overthinking this. ALL of the Dreadnaught end cars were built with AB brakes. PRR built at least one X29 with AB brakes in 1930. The builder's photo of the car shows it with an "EXPERIMENTAL AB BRAKE" stencil.

Ben Hom


General Steel Castings

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

I'm compiling a production list of these cars. I'm looking for month-years built. I think I've pretty much exhausted railroad diagram books and similar archival materials, so evidence off of photos would be more useful. There are lots of small orders. The completed list will be available for free on line.
 
Thanks,
Eric N.


Mark your calendar for RPM-East

Eric Hansmann
 

RPM-East is set to roll in two months! It’s time to make your plans to rekindle your modeling efforts after a long, cold winter! We will meet again in Greensburg, PA, just east of Pittsburgh, on March 27 & 28. Here is what we are planning.

  • two days of prototype and model presentations
  • a large display room to share your modeling efforts and learn new techniques
  • a variety of vendors selling goods for prototype modeling
  • Thursday evening operating sessions on local model railroads
  • an informal Saturday buffet 
  • Sunday model railroad layouts to visit 

Registration is only $38, with an additional buffet cost of $28.


There is a special hotel room rate of $105 per night, plus taxes.


Registration forms, hotel information, and more details can be found at the RPM-East website:

RPM-East Railroad Prototype Modeler Seminar


We are now using PayPal for registrations directly from the website!


A wide variety of rail-related subjects will be presented. Twenty speakers are set for RPM-East, with more to come! Additional details will be posted soon to the website. A tentative presentation schedule will be available a couple of weeks before the event.


Take action and register now for RPM-East!


Eric Hansmann

RPM-East Publicity and Web Guy


Very sorry guys

Pierre Oliver
 

I will not be at the Amherst Railway Society Train SHow this weekend.
I was refused entry into the US because my products aren't labeled with "Product of Canada"
If you were hoping to do some shopping with me, contact me via email and we'll try and take care of your wish list.
Can't begin to tell you how angry I am right now.

--
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com


Re: Car Weights

Tony Thompson
 

       For years, I used simple steel strip, one inch wide and 1/8-inch thick, which fits inside an HO house car. Gets you up to NMRA weight right now. But it only works if your truck screws and coupler box screws do NOT intrude inside the car.
        Most hardware stores carry steel strip like this.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





mend plates for car weights

ed_mines
 

I see these are still being sold on e bay at what I consider to be a reasonable price (<$7 delivered, enough for 25 cars)..


Two of these plates will fit in a 40 ft. HO car.


Ed Mines


Re: Reporting marks on u-frame/center sill

Edward
 

Not just the center sill of the underframe got reporting marks applied, so did the transoms (bolsters) off each truck applied to a car. In addition, equipment trust plates were sometimes attached to the frame as well as the body of a freight car.

The reason was for identification of such parts in the event of a serious wreck, even if the rest of the car was totally destroyed - something  especially possible with wood bodies on steel frames. Also for body-on-frame tank cars, where a tank could become separated from its frame in a very bad wreck as it was basically just held in place with several steel bands.

Report marks on the trucks were also important if a truck had to be rebuilt or replaced off line due to damage from derailment or a wreck.

Ed Bommer


Accurail/WFEX reefer

Joseph
 

Having converted a few of the Accurail HO wood side reefers into BREX and FGEX reefers, I am wondering if a WFEX conversion is also possible from this starting point.

TIA,
Joe Binish



Re: Reporting marks on u-frame/center sill

Tim O'Connor
 

It probably began shortly after the first underframe theft!

At 1/23/2015 09:21 AM Friday, you wrote:

When did railroads start painting reporting marks on the underframe/center sills of freight cars?
Staffan Ehnbom

Dunno about a definitive date, but pre-WWI narrows it down. There's a LS&MS boxcar frame in North East, PA that still has its frame reporting marks, and the LS&MS "went away" in 1912.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


Re: Seaboard Air Line 8050-8099 1,958 cu. ft. Covered Hoppers

golden1014
 

Hi Ed,

My first thought was they were shaker plates, but since you said they appeared to not be damaged that rules that theory out.

I'll contact a few old SAL-heads and see if they can help.

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL


Re: Reporting marks on u-frame/center sill

Ray Breyer
 

When did railroads start painting reporting marks on the underframe/center sills of freight cars?
Staffan Ehnbom


Dunno about a definitive date, but pre-WWI narrows it down. There's a LS&MS boxcar frame in North East, PA that still has its frame reporting marks, and the LS&MS "went away" in 1912.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


Re: Seaboard Air Line 8050-8099 1,958 cu. ft. Covered Hoppers

David
 

I have assumed, without any evidence whatsoever, that they were stiffening braces to compensate for thinner gauge steel sides.

David Thompson

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