Date   

Re: Placards - anyone make decals sets for steam era?

Tim O'Connor
 


Microscale 87-975 - I think the artwork, or at least the data, was provided by Richard Hendrickson
I did this car as an explosives load about 25 years ago... for a defunct club


On 4/28/2022 9:31 AM, Charlie Duckworth wrote:

I was looking through some photos yesterday and was wondering if anyone offered steam era placards; a google search shows a hazmat placard set for modern cards but nothing from our era. Here’s just a couple examples.   If anyone gets concerned about a bad paint job or messed up decal just look at the MP SS boxcar and figure it’s prototypical   


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.

Attachments:



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Placards - anyone make decals sets for steam era?

Eric Hansmann
 

Those are cool examples, Charlie. I suspect the crew had fun with the C&O car that has the Explosives placard.

 

I created a set using publishing software. It’s only a partial page as the HO scale versions are pretty small.

 

I used collected placard images scaled down to HO size. I also create my own using text and san-serif fonts. Those turn out better as the lettering is sharper.

 

I also have a few lines for route cards. I keep these simple using numbers and letters. Tony Thompson’s placard and route card blog posts inspired the work. Here’s the link for the placard search results on his blog. You can click on the Sort By Date link after this opens.

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/search?q=placard

 

I added cut lines on both sets of the cards to ease trimming. I’ve printed the file on buff color paper and also onto newsprint and add these to occasional freight cars.

 

I add the remnants of placard and route cards more frequently. I make these from a narrow, six scale inch wide strip of newsprint or buff color paper. I slice angles and slivers of material to place onto a small dot of canopy glue on the car side. Many of my box cars are wood sheathed, so remnants can be all over the place. Here’s a blog post that points out some of these items on prototype cars.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2018/09/14/weathering-ideas/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charlie Duckworth
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2022 8:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Placards - anyone make decals sets for steam era?

 

I was looking through some photos yesterday and was wondering if anyone offered steam era placards; a google search shows a hazmat placard set for modern cards but nothing from our era. Here’s just a couple examples.   If anyone gets concerned about a bad paint job or messed up decal just look at the MP SS boxcar and figure it’s prototypical   

--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: Placards - anyone make decals sets for steam era?

Charlie Duckworth
 

Al
Thanks, I found it 87-975 and ordered a set; there’s still room for an updated set with period placards used.  Microscale’s set seems to use the same font, white backgrounds, etc.  I’ve got several examples of TRRA and MP routing cards I’m digging out and sure other carriers used similar cards. 


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: "double" brake systems

Hudson Leighton
 

I know of a Crane and a Passenger Car with "Double Brake Systems"

They have 2 of everything including the Triple Valves.

Tracing air problems on the Passenger Car was fun, you would be following a
pipe and it would end up at the wrong air system.

-Hudson


Re: Placards - anyone make decals sets for steam era?

al_brown03
 

Microscale have a placard set. I'll look it out when I get home tonight, if someone else doesn't first.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Placards - anyone make decals sets for steam era?

Charlie Duckworth
 

I was looking through some photos yesterday and was wondering if anyone offered steam era placards; a google search shows a hazmat placard set for modern cards but nothing from our era. Here’s just a couple examples.   If anyone gets concerned about a bad paint job or messed up decal just look at the MP SS boxcar and figure it’s prototypical   


--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


"double" brake systems

akerboomk
 

A question on well flats & depressed center flats with "double" brake systems
Examples:
    https://www.bmrrhs.org/flat_5000_series/
    https://www.bmrrhs.org/flat_5100_series/

So depressed center and well flats sometimes had independent brake systems for each end (I assume due to issues trying to run brake rods along the length of the car)
- Brake cylinder was smaller (2 - 7 x12 cylinders instead of one 10x12 or whatever)
- I assume "triple valve" (at least externally) was identical to "normal" car?
- But what about the air tanks - were the 2 tanks the same as "normal" cars, or were they smaller?

Thanks...
--
Ken Akerboom


WTB: Sunshine 92.8 Lehigh & New England 10298-397 2’ 11” IH Composite Gondola

 

Hello Group, looking to buy the following:

 

Sunshine 92.8  Lehigh & New England 10298-397 2’ 11” IH Composite Gondola


Please contact me off list

 

Thanks

Rich Christie

rhcdmc@...


Re: Color Wheels

Philip Dove
 

The atmospheric conditions can also effect the way a colour looks the house around me have are a light burnt orange brick in"normal"sunlight but in winter they appear a lot darker and sometimes if there are low black clouds and the setting sun shining below them the bricks appear a plum or purple to my eyes. Even the surroundings change perception a boxcar red will look brighter against lush green grass. Ideally we would paint every car to reflect the light as it was on the day we, are modelling. Even then we can't get it dead right. 


On Wed, 27 Apr 2022, 18:28 Ken Adams, <smadanek44g@...> wrote:
Charlie,

You do exceptionally well from the examples I have seen lately in painting your freight car projects. I fuss a lot trying to get the 'right BCR' and don't do anywhere close as well.  

Then we must all remember that what we see on monitors and other electronic screens may not resemble the color of an object seen directly with our eyes. Old color photographs from 70 years or more ago do not show consistent colors where they exist. Everything outdoors was also dependent on weather, lighting and time of day.  I certainly cannot accurately remember any of the colors of freight cars I saw when I was 8 years old. Engines yes because they made a major impression on my young mind (SP Daylights and Black Widows), but freight cars not really. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Burn Baby Burn

Dave Nelson
 

A couple weeks ago I went thru the archives looking for some posts about the burning of PRR’s XL boxcars – IIRC about 31,000 cars.  I didn’t find exactly what I was looking for (perhaps it was on the previous list) which was something about pulling a long string of cars into the burn track and torching 50-100 cars at once.

 

Whatever it was it must have been an impressive sight.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Hudson Leighton
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2022 3:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Burn Baby Burn

 

http://research.nprha.org/BRHS/BRHS_467_1_1374.jpg

-Hudson


Re: Photos: Unloading Bulk Cement From Boxcars

Ken Adams
 

On Tue, Apr 26, 2022 at 10:57 AM, Charles Peck wrote:
And no dust mask of course. 
Looks like there is an unused mask hanging around the workers neck.  Hopefully this was just a posed picture.  It is useful for reminding us that bulk cement products were shipped in fully lined box cars before the advent of covered hoppers. 

 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Color Wheels

Ken Adams
 

Charlie,

You do exceptionally well from the examples I have seen lately in painting your freight car projects. I fuss a lot trying to get the 'right BCR' and don't do anywhere close as well.  

Then we must all remember that what we see on monitors and other electronic screens may not resemble the color of an object seen directly with our eyes. Old color photographs from 70 years or more ago do not show consistent colors where they exist. Everything outdoors was also dependent on weather, lighting and time of day.  I certainly cannot accurately remember any of the colors of freight cars I saw when I was 8 years old. Engines yes because they made a major impression on my young mind (SP Daylights and Black Widows), but freight cars not really. 
--
Ken Adams
Omicron BA2.2 may come and go but I still live mostly in splendid Shelter In Place solitude
Location: About half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Color Wheels

Charlie Duckworth
 

After reading that 8%-11% men are color blind I don’t get too hung up about colors or arguments on the ‘right BCR’.  I found out I was green-red color blind when I took my physical for the railroad.  Since I was just summer help the nurse passed me not realizing I’d hang around for 38 more summers.  I do make sure to paint the right hues, if a Rock Island car is brown that’s the Tru-Color I use; same with a BCR if the prototype used a red that’s how I finish the car.  It’s interesting most eye doctors don’t test for color blindness.  

Here’s a web site with more details. https://www.colourblindawareness.org/colour-blindness/types-of-colour-blindness/

--
Charlie Duckworth 
Omaha, Ne.


Re: Rapido X31A

Tim O'Connor
 


Way back when I learned that PRR "DGLE" was just a black & yellow mixture, which she points out in the video
makes "green". And this is also how Pullman Green and other green colors are made, just by varying the proportion
of yellow. I've never bought a color wheel but now I may - a very useful tool !

Tim O'Connor

On 4/27/2022 10:24 AM, Eric Hansmann wrote:

Thanks for sharing your background, Charlie. Your art degree has been a great tool for your modeling!

 

A few years ago, I purchased a color wheel. After reading all the info on both sides of the wheel, I was amazed. I also wish I had bought a color wheel a few decades ago. Here’s a short review on using a color wheel.

https://youtu.be/DfKx7MjSEK0

 

My last art class was about 45 years ago and forgotten. I added the color wheel to my tool box and it’s been instrumental to mix paint for freight car models. At some point, I hope to enroll in an intro to art class at a community college so I can understand more about color, tints, and shades. A color wheel scratches the surface of possibilities.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charlie Duckworth
Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2022 1:48 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Rapido X31A

 

Bill

Thanks for the compliment; a little background is warranted.  I did major in Art in college and minored in history.  Having an art degree meant to my father I needed a ‘real’ income and he got me a job working on a Mopac tie gang in western Kansas as I’d intended to go back and get a masters degree.  I quickly learned what end of a spike maul to use, how to run a tie crane and was the assistant Foreman in a few months as most of the gang was bidding on  gangs closer to home.  The assistant Foreman job was a blast as I took a little Fairmont motorcar to the job site every morning to put out our red and green boards to indicate to the train crews where we were working (they also had a train order indicating the mile poles where we were as well).  Dad mentioned one weekend our IT department was hiring so I moved into management and was transferred to Ft Worth on the T&P (no more school for me).  38 years and 20+ different management positions I retired 10 years ago.  

 

I’d always built models since I was a preteen  (aircraft and armor) and got into model railroading in my late 20’s.  Weathering was just an airbrush technique when I started.  I then started seeing what the armor modelers were doing with filters, pin washes, pencils, etc and started applying the same techniques to my HO freight cars.  To me, what we have as an advantage over the armor modelers is their tanks probably didn’t last over a few campaigns.  Our freight cars lasted for decades meaning we have all kinds of choices with fading of paint, paint loss, rust, etc.  Making for interesting consists or a cut of cars at a siding.   

 

There’s lots of YouTube videos out there on armor weathering that are worth viewing.  But be careful you might end up with a T-34 or Sherman on your workbench! 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Rapido X31A

Eric Hansmann
 

Thanks for sharing your background, Charlie. Your art degree has been a great tool for your modeling!

 

A few years ago, I purchased a color wheel. After reading all the info on both sides of the wheel, I was amazed. I also wish I had bought a color wheel a few decades ago. Here’s a short review on using a color wheel.

https://youtu.be/DfKx7MjSEK0

 

My last art class was about 45 years ago and forgotten. I added the color wheel to my tool box and it’s been instrumental to mix paint for freight car models. At some point, I hope to enroll in an intro to art class at a community college so I can understand more about color, tints, and shades. A color wheel scratches the surface of possibilities.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Charlie Duckworth
Sent: Tuesday, April 26, 2022 1:48 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Rapido X31A

 

Bill

Thanks for the compliment; a little background is warranted.  I did major in Art in college and minored in history.  Having an art degree meant to my father I needed a ‘real’ income and he got me a job working on a Mopac tie gang in western Kansas as I’d intended to go back and get a masters degree.  I quickly learned what end of a spike maul to use, how to run a tie crane and was the assistant Foreman in a few months as most of the gang was bidding on  gangs closer to home.  The assistant Foreman job was a blast as I took a little Fairmont motorcar to the job site every morning to put out our red and green boards to indicate to the train crews where we were working (they also had a train order indicating the mile poles where we were as well).  Dad mentioned one weekend our IT department was hiring so I moved into management and was transferred to Ft Worth on the T&P (no more school for me).  38 years and 20+ different management positions I retired 10 years ago.  

 

I’d always built models since I was a preteen  (aircraft and armor) and got into model railroading in my late 20’s.  Weathering was just an airbrush technique when I started.  I then started seeing what the armor modelers were doing with filters, pin washes, pencils, etc and started applying the same techniques to my HO freight cars.  To me, what we have as an advantage over the armor modelers is their tanks probably didn’t last over a few campaigns.  Our freight cars lasted for decades meaning we have all kinds of choices with fading of paint, paint loss, rust, etc.  Making for interesting consists or a cut of cars at a siding.   

 

There’s lots of YouTube videos out there on armor weathering that are worth viewing.  But be careful you might end up with a T-34 or Sherman on your workbench!  

 


Re: Boxcar Roof Detail – Santa Fe Boxcar 24930 (1917)

Charles
 

I'm the OP. Yes, that is the overhead wire for the electric streetcars.


Re: Rapido X31A

gtws00
 

Great job on the weathering!
George Toman


Re: Boxcar Roof Detail – Santa Fe Boxcar 24930 (1917)

Charles Greene
 

Since this photo comes from the Pacific Electric R.H.S., could that overhead line be the catenary carrying juice for the electric motor-equipped cars? In fact, what looks like it might be the base of a catenary pole appears on the roof of the car on the adjacent track.

-Chuck Greene


Re: NYC automobile and single door boxcars in St Louis.

nyc3001 .
 

The autocar is from Lot 590-B, which had 1,000 members. But there were two other lots, 610-B and 594-B, that were apparently of the same design and also 9'4 IH. 

So that's a total of 2,500 autocars like 197713. There is no model for these in HO afaik.

The boxcar seems to be one of the common Spec 486 cars with 8'7 IH.

-Phil Lee


Re: NYC automobile and single door boxcars in St Louis.

Scott
 

Interesting photo.  I realize they are sun faded some but they are much more Tan color then I expected.

Scott McDonald