Date   

Re: Interior bracing in resin steam era freight car models

jon miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 5/10/2014 9:12 AM, Charlie Duckworth omahaduck@... [STMFC] wrote:
been stealing my son's Legos for years to make the flat boxcar kits easier to build

    Sounds like a great idea however I never considered it as I always thought the corners were not 90 degrees.  I'm guessing from the number of people using this idea that they are 90 degrees!

-- 

Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Masking issue with Tru-Color paint - looking for some suggestion

Dave Lawler
 

I agree with Richard Hendrickson, sandblast everything; resin, styrene, brass, cast white metal, except maybe wood!
Get rid of the shine. A matte finish accepts and holds any type of paint very well.
I’ve also used Tru-Color paint for years (when it was still Accu-Paint) with great results.
I have a home made sandblaster that I cobbled up about 35 years ago. It’s one of my most used tools.
Dave Lawler



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Re: Interior bracing in resin steam era freight car models

Charlie Duckworth
 

Walt
I've been stealing my son's Legos for years to make the flat boxcar kits easier to build and I always use acc gap filling glue. It makes for a very strong kit once the sides and ends are glued. You just need to make sure to clearance for the roof and the floor and weight so the Lego may need to be cut down.

Charlie Duckworth


Re: Masking issue with Tru-Color paint - looking for some suggestion

Clark Propst
 

I’ve used several different ‘cleaners’, but like Charlie I seldom mask freight cars. After the first couple I tried I learned to paint the body, roof, end, and underframe assemblies separately before assembling the whole car..
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Home Made Booth

wlhoss@...
 

Thanks Jack, I'd appreciate it.
 
Bill Hoss
 
 
 

In a message dated 5/10/2014 10:45:21 A.M. Central Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
Bill...

I never saw Richard's article but I built a sand blasting booth using a plastic storage bin and wrote it up for an article in RMC a couple years ago. I can send you a copy in a few days when we are back home.

Jack


Re: Home Made Booth

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Bill...

I never saw Richard's article but I built a sand blasting booth using a plastic storage bin and wrote it up for an article in RMC a couple years ago. I can send you a copy in a few days when we are back home.

Jack


On May 10, 2014, at 8:34 AM, "wlhoss@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Richard,
 
Could you be a little more specific.  I've had no luck finding the article, but I'm not that proficient in doing searches either.
 
Bill Hoss
 
 
 
 
In a message dated 5/9/2014 7:50:54 P.M. Central Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
Charlie, sandblasting is definitely the way to go.  I routinely grit blast every resin or styrene model before I paint it.  Light grit blasting does not remove detail and leaves a surface that any kind of paint will adhere to like grim death.  One of the modeling tools I would not be without is my grit blaster and homemade booth.  A long time ago I described the booth in a Railmodel Journal article which you can easily download from the internet.

Richard Hendrickson


Interior bracing in resin steam era freight car models

Walter Cox
 

I've been following the Tru Color paint thread and found the lego idea interesting. I'm  on the verge of finally starting to assemble my collection of resin cars and had planned to use short lengths of plastic angle strip to increase the surface area of the glue joint. Legos would speed things up but I was also wondering if good old Walthers goo  might be the best glue to handle any difference in the expansion rates of the two materials. Does anyone have any experience using goo for this purpose with or without using  cyanoacrilate on the resin to resin joints?
Walt


Home Made Booth

wlhoss@...
 

Richard,
 
Could you be a little more specific.  I've had no luck finding the article, but I'm not that proficient in doing searches either.
 
Bill Hoss
 
 
 
 

In a message dated 5/9/2014 7:50:54 P.M. Central Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
Charlie, sandblasting is definitely the way to go.  I routinely grit blast every resin or styrene model before I paint it.  Light grit blasting does not remove detail and leaves a surface that any kind of paint will adhere to like grim death.  One of the modeling tools I would not be without is my grit blaster and homemade booth.  A long time ago I described the booth in a Railmodel Journal article which you can easily download from the internet.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: General American tank car parts from Tangent Scale Models

al_brown03
 

Many thanks to David Lehlbach, Jack Mullen, and Tom Birkett for their help with this project. I'll post pictures if and when I manage to take decent ones: John Allen I'm not.

(Teaser: a bleed rod is as easy as a cut lever.)

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Masking issue with Tru-Color paint - looking for some suggestions.

Charlie Duckworth
 

Tim (any others who made suggestions)..
Am going to grit blast the entite carbody down to the bare resin, I started this kit while we still lived in St. Louis and that was over 10 years ago so am not sure what I used for a primer or how I cleaned off the resin.  So its time to start over with the whole process.  This car was built before I started using Legos in the corners so the interior is braced with the old Walthers wood floor stock to straighten the sides so I have to be careful and not let any water into the interior.  

Tim - Who' primer do you use?  I have some Floquil in a spray can and I bought Tru-Color's gray primer but am open to any suggestions.

Bill Herbert, who built this model a couple of years ago also suggested cutting the Tamiya tape into  smaller widths so there's less tape on the surface of the model.  

So here's the steps I plan next
- blast the carbody with grit
- clean with Comet
- primer
- spray the Tru-Color Eagle gray
- wait acouple of days before masking
- mask using smaller stripes of Tamiya tape
- say two Hail Marys
- spray the Eagle Blue
- pull up the tape and hopefully be decalling 

I could chicken out and paint this car BCR with the Route of the Eagles on it but an Eagle Merchandise cars is a 'must have'  any Mopac prototype modeler so am staying the course on this one.

Charlie Duckworth




Re: Masking issue with Tru-Color paint - looking for some suggestions.

Greg Martin
 

Charlie,
 
If you don't want to strip the paint entirely you can do the next best thing and wet sand the area where the paint pulled off.  I would start with a light sanding of 400 them 600 then if need be 1200 and focus on feathering the area making sure you get all the loose paint.
 
Touch up the strips using a 3M Post Um Sticky notes acting like masking tape as it adheres lighter and should not pull the paint afterwards, but no guarantee...
 
Greg Martin  
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 5/9/2014 5:19:51 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:

Anyone have any suggestion as to what might be the best means to tackle this?   


Thanks,

Charlie Duckworth


Interesting Load Ideas

NicholasF
 

Moving the Field Museum:

Moving The Field Museum (1920)

 

This is perhaps the most interesting of the possibilities:


Moving the Fighting African Elephants


Take Care

-Nick Fry



Re: Masking issue with Tru-Color paint - looking for some suggestions.

bobjonesmodels@...
 

Hi , I use SHOUT laundry detergent and a run through a dishwasher cycle on resin . The SHOUT has no oils in it and seems to remove release agents very w ell . Haven't used this paint yet , but it seems to be a lacquer . Bob Jones


On May 9, 2014, at 8:23 PM, "'Aley, Jeff A' Jeff.A.Aley@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Did you throroughly remove any mold-release compound from the resin before painting?  If not, perhaps that is the source of your problems.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, May 09, 2014 5:20 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Masking issue with Tru-Color paint - looking for some suggestions.

 

 

Need some help and suggestions..

 

I have a Sunshine Models Mopac Eagle Merchandise boxcar that I just painted the Eagle gray on.  I then masked the gray with Tamiya masking tape to spray the Eagle Blue.  My stripe on the right side of the door was a little low so I pulled up the tape to reposition it and found the paint lifted off in several areas down to the resin side.   I've sprayed Tru-Color on several freight cars and found the paint to be very easy to use but these were all single color boxcar or stockcars so am at a loss on what to do.  Their web site says "the paint masks easily" on plastic but doesn't mention resin.  

 

One option is a friend here has a sand blaster to be used on models that I can borrow, am thinking I need to blast off all the old paint and this will give the resin surface some 'tooth' for the Tru-Color to better adhere to.   The other option would be to respray the car with a model primer and then respray the Eagle Gray.  

 

Anyone have any suggestion as to what might be the best means to tackle this?   

 

Thanks,

Charlie Duckworth


Re: Masking issue with Tru-Color paint - looking for some suggestions.

Tom Vanwormer
 

Clark,
Did you clean off the mold release on the resin kit?  I use a 9 to 1 mixture of EZ Clean to water in my ultrasonic cleaner and have no problems with adherence on resin.
Tom VanWormer
Monument CO

cepropst@q.com [STMFC] wrote:

 

I’ve had trouble with any brand of paint sticking to resin when masked. I don’t know of a better prep than you did other than blasting with some medium.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Masking issue with Tru-Color paint - looking for some suggestions.

Tim O'Connor
 

Charlie did you use a primer? Tru-Color, Accupaint and Star all adhere to
styrene (I think) because they all include MEK. There's basically nothing in
their formulas that sticks particularly well to resin, so I always prime.

Tim O'Connor

Need some help and suggestions..

I have a Sunshine Models Mopac Eagle Merchandise boxcar that I just painted the Eagle gray on. I then masked the gray with Tamiya masking tape to spray the Eagle Blue. My stripe on the right side of the door was a little low so I pulled up the tape to reposition it and found the paint lifted off in several areas down to the resin side. I've sprayed Tru-Color on several freight cars and found the paint to be very easy to use but these were all single color boxcar or stockcars so am at a loss on what to do. Their web site says "the paint masks easily" on plastic but doesn't mention resin.

One option is a friend here has a sand blaster to be used on models that I can borrow, am thinking I need to blast off all the old paint and this will give the resin surface some 'tooth' for the Tru-Color to better adhere to. The other option would be to respray the car with a model primer and then respray the Eagle Gray.

Anyone have any suggestion as to what might be the best means to tackle this?

Thanks,
Charlie Duckworth


Re: Masking issue with Tru-Color paint - looking for some suggestions.

Charlie Duckworth
 

Richard and Clark
Thanks for the suggestion on sandblasting using grit.

Charlie Duckworth


Re: Masking issue with Tru-Color paint - looking for some suggestions.

Clark Propst
 

I’ve had trouble with any brand of paint sticking to resin when masked. I don’t know of a better prep than you did other than blasting with some medium.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Masking issue with Tru-Color paint - looking for some suggestions.

Richard Hendrickson
 

On May 9, 2014, at 5:19 PM, omahaduck@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Need some help and suggestions..

I have a Sunshine Models Mopac Eagle Merchandise boxcar that I just painted the Eagle gray on.  I then masked the gray with Tamiya masking tape to spray the Eagle Blue.  My stripe on the right side of the door was a little low so I pulled up the tape to reposition it and found the paint lifted off in several areas down to the resin side.   I've sprayed Tru-Color on several freight cars and found the paint to be very easy to use but these were all single color boxcar or stockcars so am at a loss on what to do.  Their web site says "the paint masks easily" on plastic but doesn't mention resin.  

One option is a friend here has a sand blaster to be used on models that I can borrow, am thinking I need to blast off all the old paint and this will give the resin surface some 'tooth' for the Tru-Color to better adhere to.   The other option would be to respray the car with a model primer and then respray the Eagle Gray.  

Anyone have any suggestion as to what might be the best means to tackle this?   

Thanks,

Charlie Duckworth

Charlie, sandblasting is definitely the way to go.  I routinely grit blast every resin or styrene model before I paint it.  Light grit blasting does not remove detail and leaves a surface that any kind of paint will adhere to like grim death.  One of the modeling tools I would not be without is my grit blaster and homemade booth.  A long time ago I described the booth in a Railmodel Journal article which you can easily download from the internet.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Masking issue with Tru-Color paint - looking for some suggestions.

clipper841@att.net <clipper841@...>
 

CHARLIE:
just a heads up, most resin manufacturers, suggest using comet, it's
lanolin free, where as other cleansers and soaps, are not, check
our cleanser's label for content
mel perry

On May 9, 2014, at 5:30 PM, omahaduck@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

I scrub the sides with a tooth brush and Dutch Cleanser before painting so woul have to think the mold release was gone.


Charlie Duckworth



Re: Masking issue with Tru-Color paint - looking for some suggestions.

Charlie Duckworth
 

I scrub the sides with a tooth brush and Dutch Cleanser before painting so woul have to think the mold release was gone.

Charlie Duckworth

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