Date   

Re: Fork Lifts as Freight Car Movers ...

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Further to Jim's out-of-era post, one day about 15 years ago, I was on my
way to work which involved driving past a lumber wholesaler. There was a
BRAND NEW box car there, so new the paint was still aromatic, and it had
just been spotted by the local. I thought I'd go back at lunch and take a
good photo. When I went back there was a long, deep "scratch" (more of a
dent) from the nitwit fork truck guy having opened the door "the easy way."


At least this is a post about a freight car, even if in this list's rules it
doesn't exist yet.

Schuyler

Hi all,

Fork lifts were/are often used to move cars.
I have even seen a fork lift operator shoving a car on a siding using the
points of the fork!
(I was going West out of Yakima in 1988 or so, the car was at a lumber yard
and was loaded - door open/etc.)
And I've seen the "evidence" of doing so as a hole in the end of car,
easily explained long 'dents' in the car side where the fork was pushed
against a rib in the car and it slipped over it, car doors hanging
loose/almost falling off with 'fork use evidence' (dents), etc.

"What can be thought of will be attempted" ... Jim


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Yahoo Groups Links


Fork Lifts as Freight Car Movers ...

Jim Betz
 

Hi all,

Fork lifts were/are often used to move cars.
I have even seen a fork lift operator shoving
a car on a siding using the points of the fork!
(I was going West out of Yakima in 1988 or so,
the car was at a lumber yard and was loaded -
door open/etc.)
And I've seen the "evidence" of doing so
as a hole in the end of car, easily explained
long 'dents' in the car side where the fork
was pushed against a rib in the car and it
slipped over it, car doors hanging loose/almost
falling off with 'fork use evidence' (dents), etc.

"What can be thought of will be attempted" ... Jim


Re: 3 photos

John Barry
 

Once upon a tine. . .

Couldn't resist, darn auto completes.

Standardized terminology is great, but whose standard? Al just gave two choices in his post. Is it a 4-6-0 or a B-C-0? Getting back to STMFCs are those corregated ends with the raised portions to the inside of the car inverse inverted or reverse?

John Barry

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On Sat, Sep 20, 2014 6:58 AM PDT water.kresse@... [STMFC] wrote:


Great images!  Wish forks doing captions would describe cars and locomotives by general descriptions first and then road specific classes . . . like 4-6-0 or ten-wheeler . . . and then class P2.  Every railroad has its own classes.
 
Al Kresse
.



Re: 3 photos

water.kresse@...
 


Great images!  Wish forks doing captions would describe cars and locomotives by general descriptions first and then road specific classes . . . like 4-6-0 or ten-wheeler . . . and then class P2.  Every railroad has its own classes.
 
Al Kresse
.



Re: Reality check (Was: 3D Printers at Des Plaines Hobbies)

riverman_vt@...
 

Hi folks,

 

     For those who are interested Dremel is also now offering a 3-D printer but at a $999 price, or nearly double that which Ron Sebastian offers through Des Plaines Hobbies. A good write-up of it can be bound be

Googling "Dremel 3-D printer".

 

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: making bolted side trusses for a TT scale master

Benjamin Scanlon
 

Thank you Arved, I will have a look at that, if it's available in the UK.

If possible, I'd like to try to get away from the MEK type solvents as much as I can, because I've tried so many yet never really gotten a good result with detail work.

ACC or CA (assuming the same thing on different sides of the Atlantic) doen't give you much room for error either.

Most things I make I would like cast (TT not exactly being awash with rolling stock) so structural strength may not matter so much as the car side is going to be a master, and not going to be handled or have that much wear and tear.

Ben Scanlon
Tottenham Hale, England


Re: Flatcar deck color

Greg Martin
 

Looks to me to be a Gerlinger Fork Lift but it would be nicer to have a closer shot.
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 
In a message dated 9/19/2014 5:32:45 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:

Tangent alert...

Is the tractor like vehicle at the top of the second image a form of track mobile / car mover?

The wheel configuration looks like it would allow two wheels inside the gage and two outside.

Thanks

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio


Reality check (Was: 3D Printers at Des Plaines Hobbies)

Robert kirkham
 

Just an update on Shapeways: received a refund of my shipping costs on my last order from Shapeways after letting them know the surface finish on a part wasn’t good (though tolerable)  
 
Then I received the roof mentioned below.  It has the usual limitations of the material (very slight grain) but is satisfactory for the role it is to serve.  It should sand up very nicely. 
 
Bottom line: not good enough surface finish unless you can hand finish the part.  But for a model where that’s an option, low cost, easy to interact with and serviceable. 
 
Rob Kirkham
 

On Sep 13, 2014, at 1:09 PM, "Robert rdkirkham@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 
On the other hand . . . at least I received a follow up e-mail from Shapeways on my latest venture asking me to complete a survey.  When I scored them a very kind hearted 4/10, they asked why and asked for photos.  Maybe some light at the end of  . . . well, I’m not sure this very dark place is a tunnel yet.
 
What I am finding is they can be used for right sizing and developing fit on parts I will later print elsewhere.   So far the dimensions as printed are very very close to as drawn.  So I adapt what I use Shapeways for.  On a small street car model for BCER (clerestory roof) I did a very simplified roof design which will facilitate hand finishing.   I hope that will work well enough (should be here soon).  
 
Rob Kirkham  
 
 


Re: Modeling two eras

John Larkin
 

Lot of good ideas out there but there has to be one oddball in the bunch and I guess I'm it.  I looked at a drawing I'd gotten from Lima in high school of a NYC 4-8-6 and have finally decided that a well-run steam road (i.e., N&W) or outstanding steam designs could be financially justified for years past the end of steam on most roads.  In fact, the basis is a 1969 era steam road running home built 4-8-6 and 4-6-8-6 locomotives along with fleets of engines that were bought second hand from major steam roads and were still in good shape, or in a few cases, overhauled engines that just never turned a wheel, all of which means very cheap capital costs.  Thus I can have my NYC 4-8-4 along with a N&W A and throw in some Alleghenys for good measure - this is a road with steep grades in the western part but fairly flat grades on the east, giving long runs for both power and speed.  Bypassing Chicago helps as does access to coal mines online, and a good industrial base with a mix of agriculture makes for a totally imaginary but fun road.  I've actually got a start on a 1.6" scale 4-8-6 but it'll take some time and I need to get both the HO and the 7.5" gauge track built. 

All I need to do now is live to 120 and I'll have it all done, but I'll probably be committed by then.....

John Larkin


On Friday, September 19, 2014 8:55 AM, "golden1014@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Clark,

I've given up on trying to be disciplined and have decided to model all eras, scales and gauges.  And all locales too.  It's easier.  Of course I'm just an armchair modeler in N, S, TT, G, No. 1, and so forth but that doesn't matter.  

I do have a sweet pair of brass P48 ARA trucks that's begging for model to be kingpinned to.  Perhaps a steam era 1937 box car might make an appearance at The 'Ville.

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL



Re: Flatcar deck color

Steve SANDIFER
 

A fork-lift I believe. .


Sent by Steve Sandifer via the Samsung Galaxy S™III


-------- Original message --------
From: "Matt Goodman goodman312@... [STMFC]"
Date:09/19/2014 7:32 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Flatcar deck color

 

Tangent alert...

Is the tractor like vehicle at the top of the second image a form of track mobile / car mover?

The wheel configuration looks like it would allow two wheels inside the gage and two outside.

Thanks

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Sep 15, 2014, at 7:57 PM, "Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Fran Giacoma asked:
"I purchased a Bachman[n] 52' N&W flatcar for use at the interchange on my B&O Shenandoah SD layout. The simulated wood deck is painted flat black like the rest of the car. Given the built date on the car is 5-56 and the setting for my layout is fall 1956, what would be the actual color of the deck? It just does not look right as it is now."

Builders photos of N&W Class F-3 (built June 1953) from the Virginia Tech Norfolk Southern collection:
http://spec.lib.vt.edu/imagebase/norfolksouthern/full/ns2473.jpeg
http://spec.lib.vt.edu/imagebase/norfolksouthern/full/ns2549.jpeg

Unfortunately, they're in black and white and don't give you a conclusive answer, but the decks are definitely not a light "fresh" lumber color.

Ben Hom

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Posted by: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
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Yahoo Groups Links


Re: Flatcar deck color

William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Hi Matt & Group,

I believe what you are seeing is the aft end of a heavy duty forklift. Use as a car mover might have been possible but not its specific main duty.

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On Sep 19, 2014, at 5:32 PM, Matt Goodman goodman312@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Tangent alert...

Is the tractor like vehicle at the top of the second image a form of track mobile / car mover?

The wheel configuration looks like it would allow two wheels inside the gage and two outside. 

Thanks

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Sep 15, 2014, at 7:57 PM, "Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Fran Giacoma asked:
"I purchased a Bachman[n] 52' N&W flatcar for use at the interchange on my B&O Shenandoah SD layout. The simulated wood deck is painted flat black like the rest of the car. Given the built date on the car is 5-56 and the setting for my layout is fall 1956, what would be the actual color of the deck? It just does not look right as it is now."

Builders photos of N&W Class F-3 (built June 1953) from the Virginia Tech Norfolk Southern collection:
http://spec.lib.vt.edu/imagebase/norfolksouthern/full/ns2473.jpeg
http://spec.lib.vt.edu/imagebase/norfolksouthern/full/ns2549.jpeg

Unfortunately, they're in black and white and don't give you a conclusive answer, but the decks are definitely not a light "fresh" lumber color.

Ben Hom

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Posted by: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
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Yahoo Groups Links



Re: Flatcar deck color

 

Tangent alert...

Is the tractor like vehicle at the top of the second image a form of track mobile / car mover?

The wheel configuration looks like it would allow two wheels inside the gage and two outside.

Thanks

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Sep 15, 2014, at 7:57 PM, "Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Fran Giacoma asked:
"I purchased a Bachman[n] 52' N&W flatcar for use at the interchange on my B&O Shenandoah SD layout. The simulated wood deck is painted flat black like the rest of the car. Given the built date on the car is 5-56 and the setting for my layout is fall 1956, what would be the actual color of the deck? It just does not look right as it is now."

Builders photos of N&W Class F-3 (built June 1953) from the Virginia Tech Norfolk Southern collection:
http://spec.lib.vt.edu/imagebase/norfolksouthern/full/ns2473.jpeg
http://spec.lib.vt.edu/imagebase/norfolksouthern/full/ns2549.jpeg

Unfortunately, they're in black and white and don't give you a conclusive answer, but the decks are definitely not a light "fresh" lumber color.


Ben Hom



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Posted by: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
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Yahoo Groups Links


Re: Modeling two eras

O Fenton Wells
 

I did that back in the 1980's in Columbus OH.  We did the Ohio State Fair layout so I spent tons of time and money on 70's era freight cars and diesels.  I high nosed about 15 SR diesels, before Cannon had the kits out!
They turned out pretty well and made the pages of MR and the cover of the NMRA Bulletin.......BUT
Sold all that stuff on eBay, never again

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Re: making bolted side trusses for a TT scale master

arved_grass
 

I suggest giving Tamiya "Super Thin" cement a try.
------------------------
Arved Grass
Fleming Island, Florida

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On Thu, 9/18/14, benjaminscanlon@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Subject: [STMFC] Re: making bolted side trusses for a TT scale master
To: STMFC@...
Date: Thursday, September 18, 2014, 11:25 AM

Thanks for the tips gentlemen.  What does
'Do use the ACC to avoid ACC attack.' mean though? 
 I'm thinking of going for Testors liquid
cement ang giving up on the MEK/Plastruct weld family
entirely for detail work.  If there are pitfalls with the
Testors product it might be good to know. 
 I like the IC car because I've always
been drawn to Fowler and similar cars and I like oddities.
Got a CGW 1923 ARA car in the works too; another 'one
railroad only' car that's distinctive.
 If anyone has a candidate for an early NYC
(or subsidiaries) steel boxcar, that might have been used in
grain service in the 60s,  I'd like to model something
unusual in that line too.  Ben Scanlon


3 photos

gary laakso
 

A great picture of a flat car load and it shows the NP flat car under frame nicely.  Picture was taken on the Milwaukee:
 
 
Here is a streaky weathered CMO boxcar:
 
 
Yes, the NP curved roofs lost paint and showed bare metal:
 
 
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock


Re: Flatcar deck color sign your post!

Tim O'Connor
 


Beats me, Norman! :-)

Tim O'



What happened to signing our post?
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 
In a message dated 9/18/2014 8:10:04 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

."And no great care was given during loading/unloading either. In the real world no one ever worried about what flat car decks looked like after use, so modelers shouldn't worry about it either."

My intent was to say a modeler can do nothing wrong w/ weathering. There's a very good probability it has happened in the real world. That was my experience in my conductor days..


Re: Modeling two eras

Clark Propst
 

Thanks for taking my hint Ed!! Very much appreciated.
 
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa
 


Re: Modeling two eras

golden1014
 

Clark,

I've given up on trying to be disciplined and have decided to model all eras, scales and gauges.  And all locales too.  It's easier.  Of course I'm just an armchair modeler in N, S, TT, G, No. 1, and so forth but that doesn't matter.  

I do have a sweet pair of brass P48 ARA trucks that's begging for model to be kingpinned to.  Perhaps a steam era 1937 box car might make an appearance at The 'Ville.

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL


Re: Flatcar deck color sign your post!

Greg Martin
 

What happened to signing our post?
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 
In a message dated 9/18/2014 8:10:04 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:

 

."And no great care was given during loading/unloading either. In the real world no one ever worried about what flat car decks looked like after use, so modelers shouldn't worry about it either."

My intent was to say a modeler can do nothing wrong w/ weathering. There's a very good probability it has happened in the real world. That was my experience in my conductor days.. 


Re: Modeling two eras

Ed Hawkins
 


On Sep 18, 2014, at 3:03 PM, cepropst@q.com [STMFC] wrote:

I could easily have the car done by Naperville, or my next ops, in two weeks, but I don’t have the correct? hand brake. Ed has this series (21xxx-22xxx) hand brakes blank on his list, but I have Ureco down in my notes. Details Associates makes a later version I’ll have to find.
 
Two errors in my original post.
1- The M&StL covered hopper in my photo is a PS2, not a PS1
2- the CMO cars were built in 42, not the late 40s.
 
Clark,
After a long time looking I was able to locate a diagram covering these CMO cars. 

CMO 21400-22414 (even), 508 cars built ca. 4-42 by GATC (Build Order 2885) had Viking roofs, 5-5 Dreadnaught Ends, 10-panel riveted sides, Youngstown doors ("prewar" style like the door offered by InterMountain), Ajax hand brakes, Apex r/b & b/s, 8-rung side ladders, shorter (at the bottom) 7-rung end ladders having the same rung spacing as the sides, 50-ton double truss spring plankless trucks, cast iron wheels (possibly upgraded to steel depending on time), and push-pole pockets. 

I have seen just two photos from this series, 21824 taken in March 1958 by W.C. Whittaker and 22366 taken in 1961 by Paul Dunn (Richard Burg collection). Both photos show the cars after receiving billboard C&NW stencils above the reporting marks, so the lettering was vastly different than when new. 

Ureco hand brakes were on CMO 20000-20048 (even), express box cars, and 20050-20398 (even). These series were part of a larger order of 700 cars (CMO 20000-21398 even) built by ACF ca. 10-41.

Clark, you can now proceed with your model with assurance that the Ajax hand brake is correct. :)
Regards,
Ed Hawkins