Date   

Re: old decals

Thomas Baker
 



I have used the following methods:

1. Spraying old decals with Testor's Glosscote or Dullcote.  Both seem to work.

2. Painting old decals with the decal preservative marketed by Micro-Scale works as well.

3. Spraying old decals with Testor's Decal Preservative, a product that a fellow modeler gave to me, works very well. 

All methods require that one allow time for the product to dry. All of the above-named have worked.  I model in S and have used some very old S-scale CHAMP decals, and they have come out fine.  I do not advise applying old decals without application of some product that preserves them.

I have also found that Micro-Scale decals require extreme care in application.  If the package has been opened or is old, then an application of some preservative is necessary.  Testor's Decal Preservative has worked best on old Micro-Scale decals I have found.

Tom Baker


Re: old decals

O Fenton Wells
 

I overspray them with a thin coat of the gloss I use to prepare the car for decaling.  In addition Microscale makes a liquid that you can paint them with  then let them dry before you cut them and soak them to apply to your model.  This works well for me but I'm sure there are other ways as well.
fenton wells


On Thu, Jan 2, 2014 at 1:20 PM, <paul.doggett2472@...> wrote:
 

Hi can anyone help please how do I stop older decals breaking up when I need to use them, also how do you tell if they are likely to break up thanks

Paul Doggett

England




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Re: old decals

Barry Bennett
 

Young Mr Thompson has replied with standard answer, use Microscale decal fluid, but I am not so sure. I have tried using it on F&C crumbly decals and got very little success. This may be because they are thin film. What you could try id to paint a coat of decent gloss varnish on, Humbrol or the like. 

What car set is it you are having trouble with?

Barry 


On Thu, Jan 2, 2014 at 6:26 PM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:
 

paul doggett wrote:

 
Hi can anyone help please how do I stop older decals breaking up when I need to use them, also how do you tell if they are likely to break up thanks

   I use the Microscale Liquid Decal Film, works fine. I used to spray Dullcote on the decals, doesn't always work. If they are very old, better coat them.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: What is this tank car?

rwitt_2000
 

Andy,

American Train & Track and others marketed clones of the Athearn tank car as well as the Athearn ARA quad hopper both of which are in the Walthers Trainline. May be the tooling came from one of those companies.

Bob Witt


Re: old decals

Tony Thompson
 

paul doggett wrote:

 
Hi can anyone help please how do I stop older decals breaking up when I need to use them, also how do you tell if they are likely to break up thanks

   I use the Microscale Liquid Decal Film, works fine. I used to spray Dullcote on the decals, doesn't always work. If they are very old, better coat them.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





old decals

paul.doggett2472@...
 

Hi can anyone help please how do I stop older decals breaking up when I need to use them, also how do you tell if they are likely to break up thanks

Paul Doggett

England


Re: What is this tank car?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jan 1, 2014, at 10:34 PM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

 From the early 1930s, Standard Oil of New Jersey controlled Skelly Oil via a holding company called Mission Corporation -- which also owned Tidewater Associated, so the leased tank car is no accident. After J. Paul Getty got control of Mission away from Standard, he continued the ownership of Tidewater Associated and Skelly via Mission well into the 1950s.
Thanks, Tony.  I wasn’t aware of the close connection between Skelly and Tidewater Associated.  The history of the awl bidness was really intricate 

Richard Hendrickson



Re: Precision Scale track

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

I have several sections of PSC code 70 track  on my layout,  but was never motivated to purchase more.  

The 9' ties were uncommon in the 1935-1955 period and region  (midwest) that I model, and in this regard "look funny" to me. .  Although I may be wrong (I am away from home), I believe that the thickness of the ties, and the rail contours  also gave me problems vs. MicroEngineering and Shinohara (i.e. OA rail height, and the use of M-E and/or Shinohara rail connectors).  The superelevation "buttons" on the tie bottoms were far too thick/deep for me, were a real pain to file/sand down; and one is still left with having to file down the superelevation transitions on either end (my superelevation standard is 0,30-0.32", easily gained by using common strip wood or styrene).

Denny
 
Denny S. Anspach
Sacramento, CA


Re: Gone but not forgotten?

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 


Thanks, Bob. I should have checed Carl's book, but thought I had and actually had but the car series got put down with the 1923 cars. Cars were apparently original to SV, but the order wasn't listed in the Railway Age annual order summaries.
 
Eric

Eric,

According to the information in Carl Shaver's book "Freight Car Equipment of the C&O Ry August 1, 1937" these cars came from The Sewell Valley Railroad (SV series 200-224, 25 cars).

The Sewell Valley cars were built by Pressed Steel Car in 1921. They were acquired by the C&O in 1927. There is a note about 12 of the cars being sold to the NYC in 1933 and placed in the series 424988-424999 (later 842988-842999)

Regards,

Bob Witt


Re: Precision Scale track

Tim O'Connor
 

Dick

Very cool, good to know. And price competitive with Micro-Engineering.
(Actually, a little bit cheaper.)

Tim O'Connor

Gene Green asked about Precision Scale Co. track, which steam era freight car models roll on, as I recall.

Yep, they make both straight (flat bottom) and curved (super-elevated) track - a unique idea. The HO stuff also has 9'-0" ties, instead of the usual 8'-0".

It's on their website under the "Misc." tab. Then pick your scale and gauge.
http://www.precisionscaleco.com/

I figured someone besides Gene might like to know also.

Happy New Year,
Dick Harley
Laguna Beach, CA


Re: What is this tank car?

Tony Thompson
 

Richard Hendrickson wrote:

 

Brian is correct.  The Skelly Oil Co. had a substantial fleet of tank cars in the 1920s (more than 1,000 cars) but, like many private tank car owners, they sold them in 1933 to Union Tank Line owing to the economic effects of the great depression and thereafter leased tank cars from UTL.  After World War II, some UTL ICC-105-400 insulated high pressure cars that were on long-term assignment to Skelly for LPG service bore “Skelgas” trade marks, but UTL never applied that stenciling to conventional ARA III/ICC-103 tank cars.  Modelers may have been confused in the past by the fact that Champ offered a decal set for a UTL car with “Skelgas” logo but, though the car number was correct for a high pressure car, the application drawing showed a conventional ICC-103.

Ironically, the one photo I know of a Skelgas car showed it with small stenciling on the tank reading “Leased to Tidewater Associated Oil Co.”  Presumably that was a short term lease, or Tidewater Associated would have complained about using a car lettered for another oil company.

      From the early 1930s, Standard Oil of New Jersey controlled Skelly Oil via a holding company called Mission Corporation -- which also owned Tidewater Associated, so the leased tank car is no accident. After J. Paul Getty got control of Mission away from Standard, he continued the ownership of Tidewater Associated and Skelly via Mission well into the 1950s.
      I have touched on some of this history (the Tidewater Associated side) in a recent blog post. If you're interested, it's at:


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: What is this tank car?

Douglas Harding
 

Skelgas was propane or “bottled gas”, marked by the Skelly Oil Company, based in Oklahoma. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skelly_Oil

Skelly stations were common in Iowa and through the Midwest. They had a refinery in El Dorado, Kansas.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: What is this tank car?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jan 1, 2014, at 6:59 PM, Brian carlson <prrk41361@...> wrote:

Others such as Richard H would know more but I've only seen skel gas on insulated cars. 
Brian is correct.  The Skelly Oil Co. had a substantial fleet of tank cars in the 1920s (more than 1,000 cars) but, like many private tank car owners, they sold them in 1933 to Union Tank Line owing to the economic effects of the great depression and thereafter leased tank cars from UTL.  After World War II, some UTL ICC-105-400 insulated high pressure cars that were on long-term assignment to Skelly for LPG service bore “Skelgas” trade marks, but UTL never applied that stenciling to conventional ARA III/ICC-103 tank cars.  Modelers may have been confused in the past by the fact that Champ offered a decal set for a UTL car with “Skelgas” logo but, though the car number was correct for a high pressure car, the application drawing showed a conventional ICC-103.

Ironically, the one photo I know of a Skelgas car showed it with small stenciling on the tank reading “Leased to Tidewater Associated Oil Co.”  Presumably that was a short term lease, or Tidewater Associated would have complained about using a car lettered for another oil company.

Richard Hendrickson


Caboose interiors & lighting questions

Brad Andonian
 

Fellas,

First: happy new year to all!
I am busily prepping and painting rolling stock; I have a slew of cabeese in progress as well as a Kyodo Snowplow (painting CP).    I do need some advice on the following:

Kyodo Snowplow:
1. what bulb should I use in the forward light?
2. any input on the coupler to fit into the forward coupler housing?

Caboose:
I am seeking decals for New Haven wood caboose, caboose interiors: beds, benches etc

Thank you in advance,
Brad Andonian
Seattle


Re: What is this tank car?

Andy Harman
 

Speaking of unknown tank cars.... I got one of these for Christmas:
http://pictures1.kyozou.com/pictures/_18/17335/17334167.jpg

LOL..... it's part of the Walthers Trainline, but it resembles the old Athearn car. Most of Walthers Trainline is inherited tooling from Train Miniature, Life-Like and others, but I don't remember anybody but Athearn (and possibly Mantua) making a car this large... Athearn also made a 3-dome car of similar configuration. I figure it's bogus anyway, but more curious as to where the tooling came from. Varney's old tank car was smaller (and I think more prototypical). I doubt Walthers would have tooled up a copy of Athearn's car, so it had to come from somebody's old tool bin, but I'm just drawing a blank. Walthers had gotten a lot of mileage out of this mold, they even did it as a "fire fighter" tank car...

Andy


Re: car tire weights

Andy Harman
 

At 01:26 PM 1/1/2014 -0800, you wrote:
I agree with Andy, lead sheet is far easier to work with than wheel weights. I bought my sheet of lead at a plumbing supply place, so if you strike with roofing supplies, you can try plumbers. My sheet, like Andy's, is probably only half used -- definitely a lifetime supply.


Many of my customers in the 80s up through the mid 90s were in the printing business and they still used lead type here and there. I have about 75 lbs of slugs with names of long out-of-business banks and businesses on them. Some are aluminum - not really usable - but most are lead/zinc alloy type and are at least flat. I used these for a long time back in the days when I tended to overweight my freight cars. But they're rather thick - 1/8" or more, and not being pure lead they tend to break rather than bend, or crumble if you try to pound them flat. Genuine pure lead sheet is much more malleable and you can cut it with scissors, fold it, etc. I probably won't use the slugs at all anymore.

One customer had 2-foot longs of blank leading... they printed election forms and other government stuff. They gave me a nice bundle of those strips way back in the mid 1980s. Much thinner, and smooth - used them up on all of the passenger cars I kitbashed back then. But the lead sheet is even better.

Andy


Re: What is this tank car?

brianleppert@att.net
 

It's the Gould/Tichy USRA tank car.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV

--- In STMFC@..., Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:

Fenton Wells wrote:

Looks like an old Varney (later marketed under Life LIke) with Champ decals applied.
Nope. The Varney/LifeLike cars were three-course, not four; they didn't have separate tank hold-downs like this; and they had a prominent seam along the tank top (probably a concession to molding limitations). This fails all three counts. There haven't been that many four-course cars. Could it be a Tichy car, Schuyler?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: car tire weights

Andy Harman
 

At 02:47 PM 1/1/2014 -0800, you wrote:
Like Tony and Andy, I prefer lead sheet to tire weights. I've had tire weights come unstuck inside cars, but I use screws to secure the lead sheet, and they stay put.
I usually cyanopoxy the lead in place. Sometimes I fold it over and stack it up, in that case I put some cyanopoxy between the layers and then squeeze it in a vice. For freight cars, if I'm not using the factory weight, I will just slip some sheet lead anyplace I can hide it.

Cerrobend is good for things like filling the hollow sill of a flat car for a low center of gravity. Its melting point is well below that of styrene IF you don't get it too hot, you can pour it right in. It's a bismuth alloy that is heavier than lead. Very expensive, but very handy to get some density in very tight spots. My dad used it on some wood kits back in the 50s.

Andy


Re: What is this tank car?

Brian Carlson
 

Others such as Richard H would know more but I've only seen skel gas on insulated cars. 
Brian Carlson 


On Jan 1, 2014, at 9:53 PM, "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

 

OK, I have, somewhere, a couple of those P2K 10K kits. I'll compare.

Thanks.

BTW, is "Skelgas" anything authentic in any way?

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Brian carlson
Sent: Wednesday, January 01, 2014 9:46 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] What is this tank car?

Sgl sent me the photo off list and it sure looks like a poor decal job on a
10k p2k type 21 tank

Brian Carlson

_,_._,___


Re: What is this tank car?

Schuyler Larrabee
 

OK, I have, somewhere, a couple of those P2K 10K kits. I'll compare.



Thanks.



BTW, is "Skelgas" anything authentic in any way?



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Brian carlson
Sent: Wednesday, January 01, 2014 9:46 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] What is this tank car?





Sgl sent me the photo off list and it sure looks like a poor decal job on a
10k p2k type 21 tank

Brian Carlson

On Jan 1, 2014, at 9:44 PM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:



Fenton Wells wrote:



Looks like an old Varney (later marketed under Life LIke) with Champ decals
applied.



Nope. The Varney/LifeLike cars were three-course, not four; they
didn't have separate tank hold-downs like this; and they had a prominent
seam along the tank top (probably a concession to molding limitations). This
fails all three counts. There haven't been that many four-course cars. Could
it be a Tichy car, Schuyler?



Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...

Publishers of books on railroad history

72701 - 72720 of 193645