Date   

Fish Car

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

Here is a link to a fish car image from the University of Washington
Library Digital Archives.

Is this car considered a freight car?

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Model Railroads Of Southern California

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Model_Railroads_Of_Southern_California/
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Model_Railroads_Of_Southern_California/>

++++

http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/fishima\;
ges&CISOPTR=36316&CISOBOX=1&REC=16
<http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/fishim\;
ages&CISOPTR=36316&CISOBOX=1&REC=16>


Re: Central Valley caboose cupolas

Steven D Johnson
 

Gerry,



What's the minimum number you need?



Thanks,



Steve Johnson





From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Gerry Siegel
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 11:26 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Central Valley caboose cupolas





If there is enough of an interest we might be able to do them. Not practical
unless there are sufficient orders.
Gerry Siegel


Re: Central Valley caboose cupolas

ghslaw31
 

If there is enough of an interest we might be able to do them. Not practical unless there are sufficient orders.
Gerry Siegel


Re: 3D printing

FRANK PEACOCK
 

Group, I think from what little I know about 3-D printing it is difficult, however take a look at the web site of Pacific Locomotive Works. (A note to keep me out of Jail: he can do freight car parts too). The examples are mostly O Scale or P:48 drivers but they are certainly done in 3-D. Bill gave me one of his reject drivers, and is was in a word, awesome. Even with the defect. It was a BLW 74" Baldwin Disc wheel center. FHP (Frank H. Peacock)

To: STMFC@...
From: tenncentralrwy@...
Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 11:04:06 -0500
Subject: RE: [STMFC] 3D printing


























Love that center baggage section combine car!



Steve Johnson



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of

lnbill

Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 9:56 AM

To: STMFC@...

Subject: [STMFC] 3D printing



Over on a diesel list I spied comments about this website where there are

several items offered in HO that are "printed" in 3-D. Nothing for us YET,

but it might provoke something.



http://www.shapeways.com/search?q=ho+trains



Bill Welch






















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Central Valley caboose cupolas

Steven D Johnson
 

Bill,



Your modeling article on your Midland Road cabooses in RMC back about 1980
or 1981 is one of my all-time favorite caboose modeling articles. I have my
RMC's from that era packed away now, but I need to go dig that one out.



Yes, I could try using one as a pattern to copy in styrene.



Thanks,





Steve Johnson



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
wdarnaby@...
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 8:27 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Central Valley caboose cupolas





I use these cupolas, Central Valley K-27's, on my cabooses. They are almost

impossible to find now...I purchased my last one on ebay several years
ago... so
I gave up looking for them and learned how to copy them in styrene. It's
not
that difficult. Certainly less difficult than hunting for them.

Bill Darnaby


Re: Beginning of RED cabooses

Guy Wilber
 

Dennis wrote:

It was an ICC requirement, with a deadline around 1928 or so... Guy Wilber will have the exact date, I'm sure.
I am not sure of your question, if you are talking about the prohibition on wood underframes it was the same answer I sent last week, January 1, 1935 and the ICC had no say in it.

Guy Wilber
Sparks, Nevada

If you look at how the typical wood car was framed, they are completely flat on the bottom side of the sills, with the body bolsters, needle beams, and draft sills mounted below. The Soo simply stripped these items off, and lowered the intact body onto a new steel fram that consisted of 10" channel center sills (which matched the dimensions of the draft sills) fabricated steel bolsters consisting of pressed steel diaphragms and cover plates, and cross-bearers that doubled as needle beams made from more of the same pressings, again with cover plates. They then re-installed the truss rods, more to hold the end sills on the original body than to keep the short cars from sagging. Surprisingly, very little was done to actually tie the body to this new underframe; the underframe did not even have side sills to tie to, relying on the existing wood sills. This however, did satisfy the ICC, whose only requirement was a minimum cross section of the steel center sill, IIRC.

The cars held up surprisingly well; I have never seen a photo of one where the body was intact but displaced from the underframe; typically when hit, the body ended up astride the boiler.

One interesting feature was the end ladders, which were only retained in sockets bolted to the end of the roof, not bolted directly to the roof. The common hard switching impact tended to drive the draft sills downward, and with this mounting the ladder simply pulled free of the roof, and left the carbody intact. :-)

It must have been the CPU that forced the early retirements of the SP cars; the Soo fleet was still going strong in 1965. In fact, it wasn't until 1966 when the new International Car Co. extended vision cars began to arrive that the Soo started to cover the cars not being retired with plywood to make them look better, although this did not include improvement to the trucks, all of which were archbar, some swing motion trucks with wood transoms. In the early seventies someone must have gotten on their case, as the plywood cars still in service were shopped again receiving various cast steel trucks fitted with leaf springs and open steel grating steps and end platforms.

Here is the Soo's contender for the oldest caboose in service, SOO 99008, this car was still on the roster in 1974, when it was renumbered 220 shortly before its disposition. It was built by the Wisconsin Central in 1880 as WC 14. Ninety four years and counting. I'll have to see if I have the exact date of retirement

Dennis


Re: 3D printing

Steven D Johnson
 

Love that center baggage section combine car!



Steve Johnson





From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
lnbill
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 9:56 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] 3D printing





Over on a diesel list I spied comments about this website where there are
several items offered in HO that are "printed" in 3-D. Nothing for us YET,
but it might provoke something.

http://www.shapeways.com/search?q=ho+trains

Bill Welch


Re: 3D printing

Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
 

Group,

There are some example masters made by rapid prototyping shown here that will be cast in resin:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2012/08/approach-to-details-for-city-of-midland.html

These are 1:87 parts for a model of the City of Midland (a railroad car ferry) produced by FX models. The last example is a liferaft with a relatively large and complex 3D surface that will be highly visible on the final model. I will report on the results of the resin casting and the appearance of the finished pieces as soon as they become available. I was more impressed with the appearance of these parts than I thought I would be. Of course, they were made by a professional with a very expensive "printer".

Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Re: 3D printing

Bruce Smith
 

Bill,

Actually, there are a number of items of interest to folks on this list. These guys (Shapeways) have been around for a bit now and can do some pretty cool things. But before you get too excited, the rules of 3D printing still apply. For example, flat surfaces in more than 2 dimensions are still hard. As a consequence, these models have visible striations where the layers are deposited. The page does a nice job of not showing this, by mostly featuring unpainted models or cad drawings <G>

Here is an example of an N-scale PRR rubber tired switcher. http://www.shapeways.com/model/517368/n-scale-1-160-prr-electric-switcher.html

The site is not necessarily set up to allow easy browsing of the products offered.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

__

/ &#92;

__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________

|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |

| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||

|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|

| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0

On Aug 28, 2012, at 9:55 AM, lnbill wrote:

Over on a diesel list I spied comments about this website where there are several items offered in HO that are "printed" in 3-D. Nothing for us YET, but it might provoke something.

http://www.shapeways.com/search?q=ho+trains

Bill Welch



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: NEW HAVEN's 36' Rebuilt Boxcars

Chris Adams
 

It just so happens that I'm in the middle building these now using the new F&C kits - one each of the steel end & wood reinforced end.

I don't know the answers to your questions offhand, but should be able to help once I get back to my reference material tonight.

In the meantime, in case you didn't already know, Mainline Modeler did a two-part series on these cars in July and September, 1988.

Chris

--- In STMFC@..., "erict1361" <erict1361@...> wrote:


I have a question on New Haven's 36 Foot Re built box cars. Of the quantity that were rebuilt in the late 1920's, were there more cars with the Re enforced Wood ends or with the Steel Dreadnaught ends re-built? When scrapping began after WW II, were the Wood end cars scrapped first or both Wood ended and Dreadnaught ended cars scrapped together? I am assuming that these cars were all gone from any revenue service use, by 1953 since I read that there were only 41 cars left in 1950 and none that received AB brakes?

Thanks,

Eric Thur


3D printing

Bill Welch
 

Over on a diesel list I spied comments about this website where there are several items offered in HO that are "printed" in 3-D. Nothing for us YET, but it might provoke something.

http://www.shapeways.com/search?q=ho+trains

Bill Welch


Re: Central Valley caboose cupolas

Bill Welch
 

Sounds like the kind of thing that could/should be copied in resin by someone.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., wdarnaby@... wrote:

I use these cupolas, Central Valley K-27's, on my cabooses.  They are almost
impossible to find now...I purchased my last one on ebay several years ago... so
I gave up looking for them and learned how to copy them in styrene.  It's not
that difficult.  Certainly less difficult than hunting for them.

Bill Darnaby

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Beginning of RED cabooses

cj riley <cjriley42@...>
 

- On Mon, 8/27/12, soolinehistory <destorzek@...> wrote:



Back in the days of natural pigments, bright red was expensive, certainly more expensive than iron oxide as a pigment.



Having been exploring the repainting of a semi-ancient Ford pickup, I can assure you that red is still more expensive, although not everyone quoted a higher price for the red. Many just groaned when I mentioned the color and I included the phrase, "The brightest red possible".


CJ Riley

Bainbridge Island WA

--


Re: Central Valley caboose cupolas

william darnaby
 

I use these cupolas, Central Valley K-27's, on my cabooses.  They are almost
impossible to find now...I purchased my last one on ebay several years ago... so
I gave up looking for them and learned how to copy them in styrene.  It's not
that difficult.  Certainly less difficult than hunting for them.

Bill Darnaby

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Oldest Caboose Candidates

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Nelson Moyer" <ku0a@...> wrote:

I went through the CB&Q/BN rosters, and I have two candidates for oldest
waycar in service.



The first one is a Class NE-1 waycar number 14118 built by the B&MR at
Plattsmouth, NE in 1880, sold to the Oregon Pacific & Eastern in 1975, and
retired in 1981 at the ripe old age of 101.



The oldest Burlington waycar I could find that stayed on the railroad
throughout its life is also a Class NE-1 waycar number 14315 built by the
KCSt.J&CB in 1874 and retired by the BN as number 11060 in 1972 at the age
of 98 years.



Several waycars made it past the BN merger to be retired after 95 to 96
years of venerable service.
Now, that's cool. I didn't think the Soo had much chance to have the ultimate oldest car; the road was a Johnny-come-lately amongst the mid-west railroads. I can't find the actual retirement date for the car I mentioned above, but it is likely right at the time of the renumbering in '74; the Soo did several of these number swaps right as cars were being sold.

Dennis


Re: Question regarding Sunshine Models

tmolsen@...
 

List,

The average wait is about six months. My experience has been that Tricia will cash the check and ship approximately four weeks later. For example, in the last three months, each of my checks check would clear the bank either at the end or the beginning of the month and a box would arrive about 4 weeks later. My February order check cleared the bank the last day of July so I am expecting that the box will show up sometime between today and Saturday.

There maybe a delay when in any month that Martin and Tricia are away attending an out-of-state historical society meeting or train show such as those that they attend in California or Maryland. The California and Maryland shows allow them to combine business with pleasure so that they can also visit family close by.

Regards,

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Nwark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@...


Re: W&LE SS box car

Allen Rueter
 

Eric,
 I have a log entries for five in October, '47 in Northern California .

--
Allen Rueter
StLouis MO


________________________________
From: Eric <eric@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, August 27, 2012 1:49 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: W&LE steel gon quest - now SS box car


 
Bill,

Here's some info on this W&LE single sheathed cars.

27000-27999 : 1000 cars built by Western Car & Foundry. Single-sheathed wood construction with staggered 7-foot wide doors, Vulcan vertical corrugated metal ends, and straight centersills.

Sadly, I have a grand total of ONE image of these cars offline. It shows up in the background of a fascinating B&O Brunswick Yard image from about 1922-1924.

These W&LE box cars appear in several images in the W&LE archive at Cleveland State University. Here's an image noted as New Lead Stark Brick. Three of these unique Wheeling box cars can be seen here. One of the cars has a reweigh date of 4-31.

http://www.hansmanns.org/images/new_lead_stark_brick.jpg

The Wheeling is an odd duck of a prototype but it served some major industries through northern Ohio. I have not found any other railroad using a combination of similar single-sheathed box car design and hardware.

Eric

Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX

--- In STMFC@..., "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I bugged Al Westerfield several times to do this car. Hard to see but note the ribs on the steel ends are vertical.



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Oldest Caboose Candidates

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

I went through the CB&Q/BN rosters, and I have two candidates for oldest
waycar in service.



The first one is a Class NE-1 waycar number 14118 built by the B&MR at
Plattsmouth, NE in 1880, sold to the Oregon Pacific & Eastern in 1975, and
retired in 1981 at the ripe old age of 101.



The oldest Burlington waycar I could find that stayed on the railroad
throughout its life is also a Class NE-1 waycar number 14315 built by the
KCSt.J&CB in 1874 and retired by the BN as number 11060 in 1972 at the age
of 98 years.



Several waycars made it past the BN merger to be retired after 95 to 96
years of venerable service.



In addition to steel underframe and wood-beam trucks, the Burlington used
galvanized steel panels on the front, back, and sides of cupolas,
contributing to the long life of their wooden waycars.



Nelson Moyer


QRE: Caboose safety markings was Beginning of RED cabooses

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

In a word, pizzazz. The large Scotchlite herald on the side of the
Burlington waycars didn't have much to do with safety because it couldn't be
see from the rear! Trailing along at the end of a long freight train, it had
minimal safety implications at grade crossings. About the only thing it did
was add flash, which is desirable for corporate image, and it made the
herald more visible at night in the glare of automobile headlights, also
desirable for the corporate image.



With respect to railroad practice, there is no universal right answer.



Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
asychis@...
Sent: Monday, August 27, 2012 6:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Caboose safety markings was Beginning of RED cabooses





I agree with Tony. The Missouri Pacific started using a reflecting paint
in then 1950s and Scotchlite later on. If there were no safety concerns,
why would they used more expensive paint or tape? I agree that safety
marking would do little in a major rear-end crash, but consider slow speeds
in
yards and switching.

Jerry Michels


Caboose safety markings was Beginning of RED cabooses

asychis@...
 

I agree with Tony. The Missouri Pacific started using a reflecting paint
in then 1950s and Scotchlite later on. If there were no safety concerns,
why would they used more expensive paint or tape? I agree that safety
marking would do little in a major rear-end crash, but consider slow speeds in
yards and switching.

Jerry Michels

84661 - 84680 of 195443