Date   

Re: Truck bearings: Solid vs. RB

rwitt_2000
 

Thanks Tony,

I believe I will adopt the term "plain bearings" or "plain journal
bearings" when discussing the conventional journal bearings used on
freight car trucks. After reviewing this discussion, for me at least,
the term "solid" has become less descriptive.

Regards,

Bob Witt

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Dave Evans wrote:
In the cyc's definition of terms, there are two entries - one for
Journal Bearings, and one for Roller bearings. There are also a
WHOLE bunch of entries for "Journal xxx", but no "journal roller
bearing", or "roller journal bearing". The definition of journal is
the part of an axle or shaft on which the journal bearing rests.
The 1953 Cyc has this definition for Roller Bearing: "The
general term applied to a group of journal bearings which depend on
the rolling action of a set of rollers in order to reduce rotational
friction."
To me this is pretty clear evidence of calling all these
bearings "journal bearings" whether or not roller bearings were
involved. That's why I would object to terming a solid bearing as
merely a "journal bearing," because in railroad definition that is not
separated from a roller bearing.

But I would note that the terms "friction bearing", "plain" bearing
and "solid" bearing do not appear in the cyclopedia. Anti-friction
bearing does appear in some of the ads to describe roller bearings.

In the same Cyc, you will find that Magnus refers to their
bearings as solid bearings. Railway Age ads and editorial material use
both "solid" and "plain" as adjectives for conventional journal
bearings.


Re: Rapido reefers?

Steve SANDIFER
 

Last email I had from Rapido said June.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: richtownsend@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2012 6:36 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Rapido reefers?



Here's a post about freight cars: has anyone heard when the Rapido meat reefers might become available?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


ADMIN: Re: Throwing Turnouts, was Re: Truck bearings: Solid vs. RB

Mikebrock
 

Richard Hendrickson says:

"That, at least, has something vaguely to do with freight cars (the
list topic, remember?), which almost all other posts on this topic
emphatically do not. Where are our group leaders when we need them?"

Lying low...hoping this subject would die on its own...lack of merit. How did all this get started anyhow. Oh well...yawn...the thread is now terminated...officially.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner [ leader? ]


Rapido reefers?

Richard Townsend
 

Here's a post about freight cars: has anyone heard when the Rapido meat reefers might become available?


Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


Re: Erie info

Clark Propst
 

Thanks to everyone who took the time to reply : ))

Not know if there are decals alavailable for Erie box cars from this time period, I model 54 BTW, I guess I should look for a decorated Branchline kit....Good luck to me....

Clark Propst


Re: Throwing Turnouts, was Re: Truck bearings: Solid vs. RB

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 28, 2012, at 2:33 PM, soolinehistory wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., RUTLANDRS@... wrote:

But yet we don't have turnout stands or turnoutmen, hmmmmmmm
Chuck Hladik
That joke is getting tiresome. Consider this; perhaps switchmen
aren't called that because they line switches, but rather because
they switch cars.

Dennis
That, at least, has something vaguely to do with freight cars (the
list topic, remember?), which almost all other posts on this topic
emphatically do not. Where are our group leaders when we need them?

Richard Hendrickson


Throwing Turnouts, was Re: Truck bearings: Solid vs. RB

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@..., RUTLANDRS@... wrote:

But yet we don't have turnout stands or turnoutmen, hmmmmmmm
Chuck Hladik
That joke is getting tiresome. Consider this; perhaps switchmen aren't called that because they line switches, but rather because they switch cars.

Dennis


Re: Throwing Turnouts, was Re: Truck bearings: Solid vs. RB

Charles Hladik
 

But yet we don't have turnout stands or turnoutmen, hmmmmmmm
Chuck Hladik


In a message dated 4/28/2012 5:13:52 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
navyfan696@... writes:





I think I heard that the confusion with
switch and turnout was because Model Railroader
style guide dictated that turnout was to be used
to avoid conflict with an electrical switch, as in
throw the toggle switch to move the turnout.

Michael
<snip>

In CSX's 2011 annual report (p. 12) it says "...and track that diverts
trains from one track to another known as turnouts."

Mike Calo
Glen Burnie MD


Throwing Turnouts, was Re: Truck bearings: Solid vs. RB

navyfan696 <navyfan696@...>
 

I think I heard that the confusion with
switch and turnout was because Model Railroader
style guide dictated that turnout was to be used
to avoid conflict with an electrical switch, as in
throw the toggle switch to move the turnout.

Michael
<snip>

In CSX's 2011 annual report (p. 12) it says "...and track that diverts trains from one track to another known as turnouts."

Mike Calo
Glen Burnie MD


Re: Erie info

Ed Hawkins
 

On Apr 28, 2012, at 12:44 PM, Steve Hoxie wrote:

In 2003 I built a Branchline factory painted and lettered kit of Erie
86012 (NEW 11-52). The kit came with a silver or aluminum colored roof
and running board. At the time, Branchline enjoyed a reputation for
accuracy in their paint and lettering schemes. Also roof paint info
was scant at best in RMJ or any other published source. I retained the
roof in the factory color. In 2006 from an undec kit I built 86296 and
painted it to match. Scalecoat II Boxcar Red #2 was a perfect match to
the Branchline factory paint.

Did Branchline really miss this one or is there more info out there?
Steve,
Your point is totally valid, and there's a distinct possibility if not
a good probability, that the original roofs were unpainted except for
coating riveted lap joints with black car cement. The practice of
coating just the riveted lap joints (eaves and seam caps) was common
during the late-1940s through the 1950s to better protect against roof
leakage. I should have qualified my statement about the black roof, and
what I said about the black roof may well be in error.

The color photo in the color guide book clearly shows black ends, a
common characteristic for Erie box cars. In both photos that I
referenced, the edge of the roof appears black as do the seam caps.
But, in retrospect, I cannot conclusively determine that the entire
roof was coated with black car cement. Even if the entire roof was
originally coated with black car cement, in just a few years the
coating would often peel off leaving the exposed galvanized sheets.

It would take a good overhead photo of a relatively new car or railroad
paint specs to make a "for sure" statement about the roof color. Thank
you for pointing this out.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Throwing Turnouts, was Re: Truck bearings: Solid vs. RB

Michael Watnoski
 

Greetings,

I think I heard that the confusion with
switch and turnout was because Model Railroader
style guide dictated that turnout was to be used
to avoid conflict with an electrical switch, as in
throw the toggle switch to move the turnout.

Michael

On 4/26/2012 11:29 AM, soolinehistory wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., w m<bulletmims@...> wrote:
I agree with Mike. "Throwing a turnout" (and "throwing a switch") is commonly used by those who work in the railroad industry (although it is not usually literally done in anger)...
Harumpf! The operating people on a railroad have very little idea what a turnout is, since all they deal with is the switch.

As I'm prone to say, "A switchman can line a switch, but it takes the whole track gang to line a turnout."

Dennis



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




C&O Coal Waybills

Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
 

In addition to the interesting details of handling coal traffic from the mines to the weighing and waybilling location mentioned in Tony's post (108842) and associated blog entry, the C&O (and according to Andy Laurent the CRR and N&W) used an interesting (at least to me) waybill format from the weighing and waybilling location to the consignee. It was half the width and the same length as a standard waybill and had a neat mixture of handwritten, stamped, and typed entries in the data fields. Since the C&O shipped a lot of coal through the Port of Milwaukee via the car ferries, I thought this format would be an interesting variation; those interested can see the model waybill at:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2012/04/c-coal-waybills.html


Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Re: Erie info

pennsylvania1954
 

In 2003 I built a Branchline factory painted and lettered kit of Erie 86012 (NEW 11-52). The kit came with a silver or aluminum colored roof and running board. At the time, Branchline enjoyed a reputation for accuracy in their paint and lettering schemes. Also roof paint info was scant at best in RMJ or any other published source. I retained the roof in the factory color. In 2006 from an undec kit I built 86296 and painted it to match. Scalecoat II Boxcar Red #2 was a perfect match to the Branchline factory paint.

Did Branchline really miss this one or is there more info out there?

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL

--- In STMFC@..., Ed Hawkins <hawk0621@...> wrote:

Clark,
Presuming you model after 1952 (which I recall you do), Erie 86026 is
from 86000-86499. They were 40' AAR all-steel box cars built by Erie
August to November 1952. Inside height 10'-3 3/4", 7' door openings,
10-panel riveted sides, Improved Dreadnaught Ends (R+3/4 early
version), Youngstown doors/Camel door hardware, diagonal panel roof.
Truck centers 30'-8 1/2".

Car 86026 came with an Ajax hand brake and wood flooring (86000-86399).
The last 100 cars had Champion Peacock hand brakes and Nailable Steel
Floors. A-3 Ride Control trucks (86000-86199). Other cars had snub-up
trucks (86200-86399) or Barber S-2 (last 100 cars).

The Erie diagram does not specify the type of running boards. A photo
of 86499 in the Erie/DL&W color guide book shows U.S. Gypsum. A photo
of 86296 available from Richard Burg also shows a U.S. Gypsum running
board. The cars in both photos appear to be in original paint with
mineral red sides and black roof & ends. Instead of the door placards
being centered in the high position, the placards were offset to the
left of center.

The car would probably best be modeled using Branchline's 10'-6" box
car, however, the height of the car from rail to top of the running
board was 14'-10" whereas the common dimension for 10'-6" standard AAR
box cars was 15'-0"/15'-1". Hope this provides what you are looking
for.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Erie info

cinderandeight@...
 

Clark
According to my Erie diagram book the cars were built at Erie's Dunmore
shops between August and November of 1952. There were three groups built,
86000-86199, 86200-86399, and 86400-86499. Car 86026 an Ajax hand brake,
ride control trucks, diagonal panel roof, New York AB air brakes, Youngstown
doors with Camel fixtures, and Improved Dreadnaught ends,. there is no
mention of the type of roof walk.
Rich Burg


C&O Coal Waybills

Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
 

In addition to the interesting details of handling coal traffic from the mines to the weighing and waybilling location mentioned in Tony's post (108842) and associated blog entry, the C&O (and according to Andy Laurent the CRR and N&W) used an interesting (at least to me) waybill format from the weighing and waybilling location to the consignee. It was half the width and the same length as a standard waybill and had a neat mixture of handwritten, stamped, and typed entries in the data fields. Since the C&O shipped a lot of coal through the Port of Milwaukee via the car ferries, I thought this format would be an interesting variation; those interested can see the model waybill at:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2012/04/c-coal-waybills.html


Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Re: Erie info

Ed Hawkins
 

On Apr 27, 2012, at 3:01 PM, <cepropst@q.com> wrote:

I would like to model Erie box car 86026. Can anyone supply info on
this car or number series?
Clark Propst
Clark,
Presuming you model after 1952 (which I recall you do), Erie 86026 is
from 86000-86499. They were 40' AAR all-steel box cars built by Erie
August to November 1952. Inside height 10'-3 3/4", 7' door openings,
10-panel riveted sides, Improved Dreadnaught Ends (R+3/4 early
version), Youngstown doors/Camel door hardware, diagonal panel roof.
Truck centers 30'-8 1/2".

Car 86026 came with an Ajax hand brake and wood flooring (86000-86399).
The last 100 cars had Champion Peacock hand brakes and Nailable Steel
Floors. A-3 Ride Control trucks (86000-86199). Other cars had snub-up
trucks (86200-86399) or Barber S-2 (last 100 cars).

The Erie diagram does not specify the type of running boards. A photo
of 86499 in the Erie/DL&W color guide book shows U.S. Gypsum. A photo
of 86296 available from Richard Burg also shows a U.S. Gypsum running
board. The cars in both photos appear to be in original paint with
mineral red sides and black roof & ends. Instead of the door placards
being centered in the high position, the placards were offset to the
left of center.

The car would probably best be modeled using Branchline's 10'-6" box
car, however, the height of the car from rail to top of the running
board was 14'-10" whereas the common dimension for 10'-6" standard AAR
box cars was 15'-0"/15'-1". Hope this provides what you are looking
for.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Erie info

al_brown03
 

What date are you modelling? I ask because the Erie 86000 series was used at least twice: in the early 20th century for 36' single-sheathed "Fowler" boxcars, later on for 40' steel cars.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., <cepropst@...> wrote:

I would like to model Erie box car 86026. Can anyone supply info on this car or number series?
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Throwing Turnouts, was Re: Truck bearings: Solid vs. RB

George Simmons
 

--- In STMFC@..., "soolinehistory" <destorzek@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@..., w m <bulletmims@> wrote:

I agree with Mike. "Throwing a turnout" (and "throwing a switch") is commonly used by those who work in the railroad industry (although it is not usually literally done in anger)...
Harumpf! The operating people on a railroad have very little idea what a turnout is, since all they deal with is the switch.
I don't know it I would necessarily agree with that as a blanket statement. I have MOP employee timetables from the 1950's, in the Special instructions item 3-C is titled "THROUGH TURNOUTS AND CROSSOVERS, AND SPRING SWITCHES". So, I would expect that the trainmen and yard crews would know what the turnout was even if they only lined the points.

George Simmons
Dry Prong, LA


Re: "Freight Traffic" Book

Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., asychis@... wrote:

Is anyone familiar with a publication, actually I think a yearly book
entitled "Freight Traffic?" I have seen it occasionally on e-Bay and wonder
what useful information it might contain.

Jerry,

It contains a discussion of definitions, forms, rules, rates, tariffs, ICC regs that influence freight movement (not restricted to rail freight).


You can download a copy of the 1920 edition here:

http://books.google.com/books/about/The_Freight_traffic_red_book.html?id=qRopAAAAYAAJ

I have the 1955 edition; feel free to contact me off-list if there's something specific you're looking for around that time frame.

Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Re: Truck bearings: Solid vs. RB

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dave Evans wrote:
In the cyc's definition of terms, there are two entries - one for Journal Bearings, and one for Roller bearings. There are also a WHOLE bunch of entries for "Journal xxx", but no "journal roller bearing", or "roller journal bearing". The definition of journal is the part of an axle or shaft on which the journal bearing rests.
The 1953 Cyc has this definition for Roller Bearing: "The general term applied to a group of journal bearings which depend on the rolling action of a set of rollers in order to reduce rotational friction."
To me this is pretty clear evidence of calling all these bearings "journal bearings" whether or not roller bearings were involved. That's why I would object to terming a solid bearing as merely a "journal bearing," because in railroad definition that is not separated from a roller bearing.

But I would note that the terms "friction bearing", "plain" bearing and "solid" bearing do not appear in the cyclopedia. Anti-friction bearing does appear in some of the ads to describe roller bearings.

In the same Cyc, you will find that Magnus refers to their bearings as solid bearings. Railway Age ads and editorial material use both "solid" and "plain" as adjectives for conventional journal bearings.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

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