Date   

Re: 3D printing

teu6500
 

I agree with Rob. I believe the technology has advanced to the point that it would render detail beyond your wildest expectations. The issue is cost.

There are online service bureaus for 3D printing, most with an automated price quote feature: send them the file, they send you a price. Seems like most of them have a $150 minimum charge. If you're producing a model for retail sales, that could be worth the price, but for a couple of one-offs, no-go.

Shapeways is one of the few bureaus that's marketing to the low-volume model makers, but you pay a price in quality and resolution, as has already been mentioned. My first experiment was a huge disappointment.

Bob Edmonson

--- In STMFC@..., "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

Yes - that's true. As Tom indicates, Shapeways rendered the first draft of
those ladders without a problem, so my guess is that the change in spec was
a business decision, not technological.

Not sure whether I reported on my progress after that. I was able to send
an order for my CPR 1937 ARA ladders to ADC and received them back with .2mm
rungs (~.008" or scale ~11/16" in real life) - three or four out of an order
of 120 didn't survive. Am now working on a drilling jig to make
installation easy. First try had too much wiggling to be precise.

Meanwhile, I've also designed a few other models including a CPR single
sheathed automobile boxcar model with inverted 5/5/5 Murphy ends. The
siding didn't print very well - I used very close to scale board shape and
no real grooves - and that didn't work. Too subtle to be rendered as drawn
because of the slight grain of the printing process and (in my opinion) poor
quality control at Shapeways. I'm re-drawing the car sides again to improve
the rendering of the wood sheathing. Since that version I've learned to
insert scale rivets and nut heads, so the new version will be better
detailed.

I find the models are usually a learning experience & sometimes a step
forward to better models. But I keep at it and am very happy with the
progress, slow as it is. The ability to create unavailable parts is real
now. I find the drawing is more of a challenge than anything else. One
starts to understand the manifold challenges a manufacturer has when
designing a product for market. Proto-dimensions do not cut it for some
things- the technology can't render the smallest shapes. So as one draws,
one learns cheats that may help capture the essence of proto shape at a
level that works for the process. Or they may just look coarse and you have
to try again. That means $$ go to development, rather than to finished
models. A real cost of learning. Fortunately I have at least one friend
who has been willing to share the cost of some of the more costly
experiments.

To me, moving along the drawing learning curve is the big challenge;
learning what the technology is presently able to do and designing to those
constraints is easier but another learning curve; finding suppliers willing
to do our small lots another; having the perseverance to continue after the
first few disasters - well, good thing it's a hobby.

Rob



--------------------------------------------------
From: "pullmanboss" <pullmanboss@...>
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 8:55 PM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: 3D printing

We seem to have this conversation every couple of months. The last time it
came up we heard about a step backwards in the available technology. See
Rob Kirkham's post #108304 from this past March 29. Rob reported that
Shapeways was no longer able to deliver parts (ladders) with 0.3mm
(0.012") features (rungs), and now required 0.6mm (0.024") minimum
thickness on such features. Looking at the Shapeways web site, I see
that's still the case.

That's not a limit of the technology. I suspect, from Shapeway's
standpoint, very fine freestanding features like ladder rungs fall in the
"more trouble than it's worth" category.

Tom Madden







------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Was Red Cabooses

np328
 

Dates can be put out for the oldest cabooses however I would wager no railroader took glory in being in one.
I had written an article for my group's historical publication on War Emergency bay window cabooses converted from boxcars. Regarding what Dennis stated about placing leaf springs in trucks; On a test run with one of these converted cabooses, they hit a bad joint with such force it extinguished the flames in the markers. Other times the springs were judged to "go solid". Can you feel that in your tailbone?
I recall reading one letter from a union brother to the local chairman that was passed on to railroad officials about dust, cinders, ash, and on occasion rain, filtering down onto the conductors work desk and reports from above, onboard an older caboose, and how the mulehide on the roof had been replaced recently, which helped somewhat, but not a lot.
One of our veteran conductors Warren McGee, talked about cabooses with so much daylight under the door, "you could throw a cat clean under em". Oh that's where I want to be on a windy Montana winter evening.
Such romance! Jim Dick - St. Paul


Re: 3D printing

Robert kirkham
 

Yes - that's true. As Tom indicates, Shapeways rendered the first draft of those ladders without a problem, so my guess is that the change in spec was a business decision, not technological.

Not sure whether I reported on my progress after that. I was able to send an order for my CPR 1937 ARA ladders to ADC and received them back with .2mm rungs (~.008" or scale ~11/16" in real life) - three or four out of an order of 120 didn't survive. Am now working on a drilling jig to make installation easy. First try had too much wiggling to be precise.

Meanwhile, I've also designed a few other models including a CPR single sheathed automobile boxcar model with inverted 5/5/5 Murphy ends. The siding didn't print very well - I used very close to scale board shape and no real grooves - and that didn't work. Too subtle to be rendered as drawn because of the slight grain of the printing process and (in my opinion) poor quality control at Shapeways. I'm re-drawing the car sides again to improve the rendering of the wood sheathing. Since that version I've learned to insert scale rivets and nut heads, so the new version will be better detailed.

I find the models are usually a learning experience & sometimes a step forward to better models. But I keep at it and am very happy with the progress, slow as it is. The ability to create unavailable parts is real now. I find the drawing is more of a challenge than anything else. One starts to understand the manifold challenges a manufacturer has when designing a product for market. Proto-dimensions do not cut it for some things- the technology can't render the smallest shapes. So as one draws, one learns cheats that may help capture the essence of proto shape at a level that works for the process. Or they may just look coarse and you have to try again. That means $$ go to development, rather than to finished models. A real cost of learning. Fortunately I have at least one friend who has been willing to share the cost of some of the more costly experiments.

To me, moving along the drawing learning curve is the big challenge; learning what the technology is presently able to do and designing to those constraints is easier but another learning curve; finding suppliers willing to do our small lots another; having the perseverance to continue after the first few disasters - well, good thing it's a hobby.

Rob



--------------------------------------------------
From: "pullmanboss" <pullmanboss@...>
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 8:55 PM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: 3D printing

We seem to have this conversation every couple of months. The last time it came up we heard about a step backwards in the available technology. See Rob Kirkham's post #108304 from this past March 29. Rob reported that Shapeways was no longer able to deliver parts (ladders) with 0.3mm (0.012") features (rungs), and now required 0.6mm (0.024") minimum thickness on such features. Looking at the Shapeways web site, I see that's still the case.

That's not a limit of the technology. I suspect, from Shapeway's standpoint, very fine freestanding features like ladder rungs fall in the "more trouble than it's worth" category.

Tom Madden







------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: NEW HAVEN's 36' Rebuilt Boxcars

Chris Adams
 

Short answer: Keep the steel end car :^)

Longer answer, including additional information (also from the excellent two-part series in Mainline Modeler) follows:

Over 12,000 of these cars were rebuilt and they formed virtually the entire boxcar fleet of the New Haven until late 1941. Even as late as 1944, these cars made up 85% of the New Haven's fleet of more than 7000 boxcars, but the railroad had started buying new all-steel boxcars in 1941 and purchased another batch in 1944. By 1946, composite/rebuilt boxcars made up only 36% of the fleet. By 1950, there were only 41 of these cars left out of a total fleet of 6000 boxcars.

Quoting from the article: "We have no information on the proportion of cars that received the two different treatments [composite end vs. Dreadnaught end], but photos of cars with Dreadnuaght ends seem more common in later years."

Based on what I've seen in my research and photos, I'd have to agree. I model the New Haven's Connecticut Valley line in October 1947 and while I will have both types of cars in revenue service on my railroad, I suspect that in reality it was more likely that the composite car would be in work train or other captive service by then, or shortly thereafter. I'll just be sure mine (I'll only have one) is heavily weathered.

Let me know if you need copies of the articles.

Best,
Chris Adams

--- In STMFC@..., "erict1361" <erict1361@...> wrote:

Charles,

That is kinda what I thought, but was not sure.
Thanks for the information. I appreciate it .

Eric Thur



--- In STMFC@..., "Charles Hostetler" <cesicjh@> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "erict1361" <erict1361@> wrote:
Basically I wanted to know which version was more common, The wood End or Steel end toward the end late 1940's? I am building the same two kits, but want to keep the more common version.

Eric,

This excerpt is from page 37 of July 1988 MM (Barkan and Nehrich):

"With its cast-steel trucks and Dreadnaught end, car 69505 typifies the appearance of these cars as they entered their final decade of service. In 1940, just one year before arrival of the first large order of all-steel cars on the property, roughly 8000 composite box cars were in service for the New Haven. Almost all of them were of this type...

...Although some of the composite-end cars probably received new trucks, all of the clear photos we have seen are of cars equipped with Dreadnaught ends. It seems reasonable to suppose that, when choosing cars to receive the new trucks, the New Haven might have given preference to those equipped with the more modern Dreadnaught ends."


If you credit their supposition, it would seem the steel end was the more common version in the late 40s.

Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Re: 3D printing

Tom Madden
 

We seem to have this conversation every couple of months. The last time it came up we heard about a step backwards in the available technology. See Rob Kirkham's post #108304 from this past March 29. Rob reported that Shapeways was no longer able to deliver parts (ladders) with 0.3mm (0.012") features (rungs), and now required 0.6mm (0.024") minimum thickness on such features. Looking at the Shapeways web site, I see that's still the case.

That's not a limit of the technology. I suspect, from Shapeway's standpoint, very fine freestanding features like ladder rungs fall in the "more trouble than it's worth" category.

Tom Madden


Re: W&LE steel gondolas of 1921 - more images

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi Eric and List Members,

Thanks for the wonderful image you posted. This is of interest to me on two fronts - in N scale there is an existing model that is a good starting point for the W&LE 52000-53899 series, and there is a commercially available model of the USRA composite gondola W&LE 51000-51999 series as well.

Can anyone say, have the sides of the USRA gon in the photo been upgraded to steel sides? It looks like that might be the case, but difficult to say with certainty by just looking at the photo. Did the W&LE do such side replacements on their USRA gons? Some roads certainly did... PRR as one example.

- Claus Schlund

----- Original Message -----
From: "Eric Hansmann" <eric@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, August 27, 2012 11:23 AM
Subject: [STMFC] W&LE steel gondolas of 1921 - more images


As the W&LE gondola questions have stirred some interest, I've posted images
of two additional Wheeling steel gondolas from the 52000-53899 series. These
were built in 1921 by Standard Steel. The W&LE also received 100 of the same
cars in the R6000-R6099 series. I have not seen any images of these
gondolas, but I suspect they may have been in captured service.

These two images were taken from a larger image noted as Berger Switch br
0.48. The image is from the W&LE archives in the special collections of the
Michael Schwartz Library at Cleveland State University in Cleveland, Ohio. I
scanned a number of images at a high resolution and was able to tweak these
pull-outs for more clarity. I believe the image documents the bridge, but
I'm more interested in the five gondolas sitting there. Four seem to be from
the W&LE 52000-53899 series, while one is a USRA composite gondola from the
W&LE 51000-51999 series. Here's the original image:

http://www.hansmanns.org/images/berger_switch_br_0.48.jpg

The image is undated, but the barest of reweigh dates can be detected on the
USRA gondola. It seems to be a 1929 date, which would mean all the easily
identified freight cars here would be about ten years old. Here are close
ups of two W&LE steel gondolas in the image.

http://www.hansmanns.org/images/wle_52959_GK_berger-switch.jpg

http://www.hansmanns.org/images/wle_53245_GK_berger-switch.jpg

Two other similar gondolas sit at each end of the image, but a full car
number is difficult to determine on the far right gondola. In any event,
here is a string of well used freight cars with original lettering that can
hardly be read. The steel gondolas seem to have lost much of their paint
since coming into service.

I suspect later gondolas acquired by the W&LE would endure a similar loss of
paint, so these images may offer some guidance.

Eric





Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX










------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: 3-D Printing - SP Flat

sp1930s
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Larry Castle" <sp1930s@...> wrote:

Dear list,

The photo of an experiment using a expensive 3-D printer to create a SP F-50-1,2, or 3 flat car frame in HO is in the photo section at

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/recent/1993113691/view

My very good friend, Bruce Barney, made me a just enough of these, some were passed on to a few other friends of ours who might wish to comment. But they are not available, not being produced, just an experiment. No, please don't ask:)

Printed was the entire one piece frame including stake pockets, and in later versions, pads for the under body brake details, the hanger for the bottom of the brake wheel shaft. Plus all the holes for the A-Line steps, hand grabs, and brake wheel shaft were "pre-drilled" during the printing process. The rivets got a little smaller and my decaling skills improved. Trucks, couplers, Tichy brakes, a wood deck, paint, and decals were the only other separate parts needed.

The purchase price of the printer, capable of very fine detail, was approximately $75,000.00 but I believe Bruce said it has been outdated by newer machines and is closer now to $10,000 on the used market. Ongoing maintenance costs also factor in. As with some other things, prices go down and quality gets better so there is hope.

Larry Castle


Re: Oldest Caboose Candidates

midrly <midrly@...>
 

The TH&B wood cabeese that I've seen had the wood siding deteriorate to dust under the steel sheets screwed onto the sides. But replacing the wood siding on the CB&Q caboose cupolas with galvanised steel sheet entirely is a different practice.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Nelson Moyer" <ku0a@...> wrote:

The steel panels were not placed over wood siding, rather they replaced the
wood siding as it became necessary to repair the cupolas. Take a look at the
color photos of Q waycars online, and you'll see where the paint peeled from
the galvanized metal as it aged. Obviously, they weren't a quick fix, given
the large number of waycars built in the late 1800s that remained in service
into the early 1970s.



Nelson Moyer



-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
midrly
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 12:57 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Oldest Caboose Candidates





Those steel panels over wood siding often trapped moisture behind them. This
practice strikes me as a "quick fix".

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Nelson
Moyer" <ku0a@> wrote:

I went through the CB&Q/BN rosters, and I have two candidates for oldest
waycar in service.



The first one is a Class NE-1 waycar number 14118 built by the B&MR at
Plattsmouth, NE in 1880, sold to the Oregon Pacific & Eastern in 1975, and
retired in 1981 at the ripe old age of 101.



The oldest Burlington waycar I could find that stayed on the railroad
throughout its life is also a Class NE-1 waycar number 14315 built by the
KCSt.J&CB in 1874 and retired by the BN as number 11060 in 1972 at the age
of 98 years.



Several waycars made it past the BN merger to be retired after 95 to 96
years of venerable service.



In addition to steel underframe and wood-beam trucks, the Burlington used
galvanized steel panels on the front, back, and sides of cupolas,
contributing to the long life of their wooden waycars.



Nelson Moyer














3D printing .. when it started

Jim King
 

Rapid prototyping and stereolithography (SL) were 2 terms coined in 1986 by
3D Systems based in California (then to Colorado, now just south of
Charlotte in SC). Desktop modelers, commonly called "3D printers" didn't
come to be until the early/mid-90s. The resolution required to make HO
patterns using the SL process has only been around since 2002 when 3D's
"Viper" machines were introduced.



Jim King

President, Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.

Ph. (828) 777-5619

<www.smokymountainmodelworks.com>



Trainmaster, Craggy Mountain Line RR

<www.craggymountainline.com>


Re: 3D printing

ken_olson54022 <kwolson@...>
 

Warning: minor rant coming...
Correction. Jay Leno doesn't DO anything except write checks.
He even had one of his minions do the driving for him when he entered a fighting robot (built by someone else) on the Battlebots TV show a few years back.
Sorry, but I feel it's important to separate the actual doers from the hangers-on.

Okay, I'm all better now...
Ken Olson

--- In STMFC@..., NHJJ4@... wrote:

Was watching a Speed channel show a year or so ago. Jay Leno has a
machine in his shop.
if he needs a part for his ?? 1903 Stanley Steamer He tales the part puts
it in and makes a copy Then he can see if it will work and make a real
replacement for the car.
Must be nice !! Would love to say ( Jay O'l buddy I need a couple if
these please !! )

Jim Evans


In a message dated 8/28/2012 12:44:12 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
thompson@... writes:




John Degnan wrote:
It is my understanding that this technology has been around since the
late '7s or early '80s.

Certainly by the mid-1980s it was already being investigated by academics.
When I was at Carnegie Mellon in those years, the mechanical engineering
faculty had a number of research projects in "rapid prototyping," as it was
called.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, _thompson@..._
(mailto:thompson@...)
Publishers of books on railroad history






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: 3D printing

Mikebrock
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 3:44 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: 3D printing



John Degnan wrote:
> It is my understanding that this technology has been around since the late '7s or early '80s.

Certainly by the mid-1980s it was already being investigated by academics. When I was at Carnegie Mellon in those years, the mechanical engineering faculty had a number of research projects in "rapid prototyping," as it was called.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: 3D printing

nvrr49 <nvrr49@...>
 

I have put some photo's of some 3D printed items in my photo folder, nvrr49. They are not Steam era freight car items, but they do give an idea of the detail that can currently be achived. When approved, they will be viewable in the nvrr49 folder.

Kent Hurley
KC MO

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

John Degnan wrote:
It is my understanding that this technology has been around since the late '7s or early '80s.
Certainly by the mid-1980s it was already being investigated by academics. When I was at Carnegie Mellon in those years, the mechanical engineering faculty had a number of research projects in "rapid prototyping," as it was called.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: 3D printing

NHJJ4@...
 

Was watching a Speed channel show a year or so ago. Jay Leno has a
machine in his shop.
if he needs a part for his ?? 1903 Stanley Steamer He tales the part puts
it in and makes a copy Then he can see if it will work and make a real
replacement for the car.
Must be nice !! Would love to say ( Jay O'l buddy I need a couple if
these please !! )

Jim Evans

In a message dated 8/28/2012 12:44:12 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
thompson@... writes:




John Degnan wrote:
It is my understanding that this technology has been around since the
late '7s or early '80s.

Certainly by the mid-1980s it was already being investigated by academics.
When I was at Carnegie Mellon in those years, the mechanical engineering
faculty had a number of research projects in "rapid prototyping," as it was
called.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, _thompson@...
(mailto:thompson@...)
Publishers of books on railroad history






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: RE Early NP Mechanical Reefer

Bob McCarthy
 

Same here.

Bob McCarthy



________________________________
From: "Phillips, III, J.A." <whstlpnk@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 3:03 PM
Subject: [STMFC] RE Early NP Mechanical Reefer


 
Hi Bob, can't seem to get that link to work. Can you double check it?

John Phillips
Seattle

Here is a link to a very early (very late steam era) NP mechanical reefer from the University of Washington Library Digital Archives.
http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/imlswrv\;m&CISOPTR=330&CISOBOX=1&REC=1

Inez Mischitz says: "SNORKERS! Good Oh!"



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: 3D printing

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

John Degnan wrote:
It is my understanding that this technology has been around since the late '7s or early '80s.
Certainly by the mid-1980s it was already being investigated by academics. When I was at Carnegie Mellon in those years, the mechanical engineering faculty had a number of research projects in "rapid prototyping," as it was called.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: 3D printing

Scaler164@...
 

It is my understanding that this technology has been around since the late '7s or early '80s.





John Degnan

Scaler187@...

Scaler164@...

----- Original Message -----


From: "lnbill" <fgexbill@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 2:02:09 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: 3D printing

While I am sure it is difficult, and as others have said it has its limitations, it seems to me that most new technologies can be described that way. I remember being Co-Chair for the education component for the National Press Photographers Assoc. Convention in Nashville and the president of the organization wanted us to have presentation on a new digital underwater camera. This was the late 1970s or early 1980s. In the end the output from camera featured in the presentation was pretty underwhelming. Look at where we are now.

Mark my words, at some point in the future I bet this 3-D printing will one more way we will be getting things we want.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., FRANK PEACOCK <frank3112@...> wrote:


Group,  I think from what little I know about 3-D printing it is difficult, however take a look at the web site of Pacific Locomotive Works.  (A note to keep me out of Jail: he can do freight car parts too).  The examples are mostly O Scale or P:48 drivers but they are certainly done in 3-D.  Bill gave me one of his reject drivers, and is was in a word, awesome.  Even with the defect.  It was a BLW 74" Baldwin Disc wheel center. FHP (Frank H. Peacock)

To: STMFC@...
From: tenncentralrwy@...
Date: Tue, 28 Aug 2012 11:04:06 -0500
Subject: RE: [STMFC] 3D printing
















 



 


   
     
     
      Love that center baggage section combine car!



Steve Johnson



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of

lnbill

Sent: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 9:56 AM

To: STMFC@...

Subject: [STMFC] 3D printing



Over on a diesel list I spied comments about this website where there are

several items offered in HO that are "printed" in 3-D. Nothing for us YET,

but it might provoke something.



http://www.shapeways.com/search?q=ho+trains



Bill Welch



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





   
     

   
   






                                                 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


RE Early NP Mechanical Reefer

J.A. Phillips
 

Hi Bob, can't seem to get that link to work. Can you double check it?

John Phillips
Seattle


Here is a link to a very early (very late steam era) NP mechanical reefer from the University of Washington Library Digital Archives.
http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/imlswrv\;m&CISOPTR=330&CISOBOX=1&REC=1


Inez Mischitz says: "SNORKERS! Good Oh!"


Re: Fish Car

Tom Vanwormer
 

Bob,
Experience on the Colorado Midland Rwy, the US Fish Commission had a
major hatchery located just west of Leadville CO on the CMs Aspen Short
Line cut off between Malta and Aspen Junction. The Fish Cars were
either transited as a special car on the scheduled passenger trains
going eastbound to Colorado Springs or westbound to Grand Junction.
When the Fish Commission was planting fry into the rivers along the
Midland mainline, the Fish Commission requested a "Special Train" which
was an extra for passenger service. So, at least for the Fish
Commission from the 1890s into the W.W.I period, the Fish Cars were
considered as a passenger car.

Tom VanWormer
Monument CO

Bob Chaparro wrote:


Colorado Midland Coke Car

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

Here is a link to a Colorado Midland coke car from the University of
Washington Library Digital Archives. Tom VanWormer of Monument, CO,
provided some background.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

++++

http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/imlsrvh\;
s&CISOPTR=65&CISOBOX=1&REC=7
<http://content.lib.washington.edu/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/imlsrv\;
hs&CISOPTR=65&CISOBOX=1&REC=7>

++++

This car was built during one of the Colorado Midland major re-equipping
efforts in 1901 by the American Car & Foundry Co (AC&F) for the Midland
with higher capacity air brake systems, metal underframes in an effort
to present a new fleet to service the customers. This was one of the
7000 series cars and a 60,000 pound capacity whereas all of the early
coal cars were 50,000 pound capacity. One of the major products the
Colorado Midland was able to service were the various coke ovens in the
area southwest of Glenwood Springs. The racks on this car provided
sufficient containment for carrying a maximum load of coke, which was
much less dense than coal. The coke was used in both the smelting
industry and in the iron and steel mills of CF&I in Pueblo CO; one of
the few major steel mills in the Western United States.

When the US Railroad Administration embargoed all traffic from other US
railroads after August 8, 1918 because of the undue number of derailment
incidents, no other railroads in the US were allowed to exchange any
traffic with the Midland. As a part of management's attempts to keep
the Midland operating the management which had only purchased control of
the Midland in Spring of 1916 when the previous owners, George Gould of
the MoPac, D&RG and Western Pacific fame planned on scrapping the Colo
Midland and use the funds earned in the scrapping sale to pay off a lot
of outstanding debt. Carlton, paid basically a million over the rigged
bid and had himself a very worn-out railroad. While Carlton had the new
rails and ties on order, the World War I priorities moved his purchases
to the rear of the priority lists.

Long story short, while the material needed to rebuild the road was
enroute, the Wilson Administration choose to shut the Midland down.
Carlton in an effort to maintain a cash flow during the embargo and
Federal Court cases sold off his better cars to shortlines and other
purchasers through out the country. Many of the cars and locomotives
were sold to lumber lines and companies in the Pacific Northwest. This
particular car was never repainted by its new owner and continued in use
into the late 1930s when the depression caused the traction company to
shut down.

Tom VanWormer

Monument CO


Re: Central Valley caboose cupolas

ghslaw31
 

Steve,
Probably 30 cupolas or more to make a resin casting practical. About what you can get from a mold before it needs to be replaced. Obviously the greater the number we make the better the price as we can amortize the master and the molds over more items. We, however, do not make a product and try and sell it, rather we make a specific number to fill orders on hand and then stop procduction.
Hope this helps,
Gerry

86061 - 86080 of 196872