Date   

Re: History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling

Pieter Roos
 

Hi Bill;

I think you will find this history of Pacific Rail Shops on the S Scale Sig site interesting, as it connects PRS, IMWX and Front Range with specific products and dates:

http://sscale.org/426/volume-1-no-2-the-prs-story/

Vol. 1, No. 1 of Prototype Modeler magazine is available on-line at Trainlife.com:

http://www.trainlife.com/magazines/model-train-magazine-contents/790/prototype-modeler-august-1977

I may be able to find some of the RPI materials you ask about.

Hope that helps.

Pieter Roos

--- In STMFC@..., "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

As some of you will remember from posts I made in the fall of 2011, I want to put together materials to create a history of modeling freight cars more accurately and more prototypically. I now have some good materials about the early offerings of Al Westerfield and the materials that publicized the releases of Westrail and Dennis Storzek. F&C is putting some materials together for me and I will be talking w/Martin about Sunshine's initial offerings.


Re: Kadee's new generation of trucks

golden1014
 

Andy,

Check out the latest SCL Modeler on the ACL & SAL Historical Scoeity web site. I did an article on the SAL B-8/B-9 cars and used the Kadee trucks with Reboxx semi-scale wheelsets and the combination works great and looks great. I also interviewed Sam Clarke for the article and discussed the HGC (Heavy Grade Compound) material in depth.

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL

--- In STMFC@..., Andy Harman <gsgondola@...> wrote:

At 07:15 PM 5/8/2012 -0700, you wrote:
to the track, making them easier to re-rail. All in all, the kind of
engineering excellence we have come to expect from Kadee, and they
are gradually replacing the older trucks with them.
Has anyone installed code 88 wheels in these yet? I was looking at the
Reboxx web site and they recommended a 1.115" axle length for the older
Kadee trucks. I tried them in a pair of the new A3s and there is too much
play - although the Kadee axle measures at about 1.115" tip to tip, the
smaller diameter and point on the Reboxx axle just rattles around in the
Kadee journal. I'm thinking they're going to need 1.125 or 1.130. My
current policy on code 88 wheels is that I will try to always use them on
any open-ended car... hopper, tank car, etc where the wheel profile is
visible, and I'll use them on a box car or gondola if the kit comes with
them in the correct trucks but otherwise I'll use code 110.

Andy


Re: History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling

Andy Harman
 

At 05:26 PM 5/9/2012 +0000, you wrote:
commercially made prototype STMFC kits. And Gould's tank car, though a model of a car which was never built, nonetheless set a new standard for a STMFC model. Criticise it all that you want to--how many of us on this list that model in HO scale don't have at least one??
I bought one when it was first released and all the rage, still under the Gould label. I never built it because I really didn't know what to do with it - back then I just tended to buy anything I thought was cool. I had no prototype photos of the car, but didn't realize nobody had any.... I finally ebayed it a few years ago. I wish now I had kept it for my wife, who is pretty much just into tank cars of any era - I think she would have enjoyed building it. She just finished her RYM acid car officially last week.

Andy


Re: Kadee's new generation of trucks

Andy Harman
 

At 10:09 AM 5/9/2012 -0700, you wrote:
Kadee's own code 88 wheels work just fine, and the trucks are
available with them (or soon will be)
Must have missed that. I was looking around the web site but didn't look under wheel sets.

Rip Van Harman


Re: History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling

Andy Harman
 

At 01:03 PM 5/9/2012 -0400, you wrote:
long after, the Storzek Soo Line and Rutland DS box car kits in resin
came along. That was when I turned my back on Athearn blue box kits
forever.
I first became interested in accurate freight car modeling in the early 1980s. I had a friend who was a college student and he couldn't afford to build locomotives, so he built freight cars - a fair number of them. He kitbashed Athearn and other cars, and used a lot of decals. He joined us in our NMRA show displays and I was floored at how much better the whole thing looked with accurate freight cars instead of the generic Athearn stuff everybody had... and this wasn't lost on the public either, we received a lot of positive comments about Bills freight cars.

I said that's when I became interested... but, in spite of having been a charter member of Richard Hosker's FCL (one of the only indie mailing lists formed before my diesel list) and charter members of this list as well as the MFCL, I didn't really start building freight cars in earnest until 2006. As far back as the mid 90s I started trying to pay more attention and do my homework before buying RTR models, but I still ended up with lots and lots of foobies. I'd love to say that hasn't happened lately but.... anyway, I think I've spent as much on books and photos as I have on kits and parts just in the last 18 months. And found an ORER appropriate to my time frame and learned more or less how to use it. Even so I'm relying heavily on the generosity of those on this list and others to provide reliable information and photos and things are progressing at a snail's pace.

In the end, I hope for my freight car fleet to be 80% accurate, 15% good stand-in or a minor era fudge, and 5% unexplainable foob. But it's not likely more than 25% of it will be built - it will be mostly RTR or deco kit built but again hopefully with foreknowledge. Good example - the forthcoming alternate standard 2-bay hopper from Intermountain. I've ordered up a bunch in NKP and Erie, and a few undecs.

So I'm a slow learner, but I've been busy doing other things....

Andy


Re: History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling Gould/TichyIMWX timeframe.

Andy Harman
 

At 12:48 PM 5/9/2012 -0400, you wrote:

Which came first IMWX cars of the Gould (later Tichy) cars? I thought the Gould cars camme first.
This is fun to try and test my memory without looking it up... my normal source is old MR ads and what not, but those are all in storage while I fix up my basement. I remember the Gould tank car and I think it got its first write-up in Mainline Modeler, which means it has to be 1980 or later. I bought one, sold it unbuilt.... I remember discussions on Compuserve's TrainNet circa 1989 where some guys were saying from now on Tichy was their minimum standard for freight cars, and I commented that they must not have a very diverse fleet. If I had to pick a number I'd say 1985. Just SWAG on my part, but I'm fairly sure that it came after E&B and the first incarnation of Fast Freddie, but before IMWX and Intermountain.

Oh, almost forgot about another flat kit from the mid 80s... the Ramax ACF 2-bay CF hopper. Front Range later did the same car in a one-piece body.

But it's difficult to discuss any of this without getting outside of the steam era since many manufacturers and pioneers crossed the boundary.

When did Sunshine and F&C start? I had no awareness of Sunshine until I attended my first Naperville event in 1994 or 95. F&C I think was around before that, I mainly remember their ads but nobody locally carried their stuff, and I rarely if ever bought anything by mail back then.

Oh, I just thought of something else. Red Ball's B&O wagon top hopper - the one composed of the flat, thin white metal castings that you had to bend to shape. I'm actually thinking 1970s, like 78 or 79 for this one. I think I still have it, never tried to build it... and I think have the F&C version also, ditto.

Andy


Re: "The Nickel Plate Story" 1953

David Henderson
 

Ray....

Thanks for the history lesson. It,s amazing what turns up in those old PR films.
Thanks again...

David

--- In STMFC@..., Ray Breyer <rtbsvrr69@...> wrote:

Just finished watching "The Nickel Plate Story" 1953 on You Tube. The item that caught my eye was at 5 minutes
and 21 seconds into the film. NKP 32082 rolled by, a panel side hopper on it's way to the coal docks. I didn't know
the NKP had panel side hoppers. Can someone shed some light on the history of these cars?
Regards.....David Henderson

Hi David,

Sure can! NKP 32000-32149 were rebuilt by the NKP from their 30750-31749 composite hoppers (the larger of their two series of composite twins, built by Pressed Steel in 1923). The Conneaut shops rebuilt them all from kit sides between January and April 1936.

These cars are a bit different than most conventional panel side hoppers, in that they only have six panels per side. When they were rebuilt their wood slope sheets and ends were replaced with corrugated ends from retired 36 foot DS boxcars. The cars are definitely a scratchbuilding project!

The cars wore two paint schemes that I've been able to determine, with 1945-1950 being the general changeover period.

The cars didn't last very long overall. While their USRA twins and conventionally rebuilt composite hoppers lasted right through 1964, these panel rebuilds were gone by 1955 (three remaining in that ORER).

Hope this helps!
Regards,
Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Modeling truss rods

albyrno
 

The advantage to THICK .025 wire is it won't bend easily,I've had craftsmen kits with .008 brass wire for truss rods.I use .011 because thats the size of the first string on my guitar,its spring steel/music wire and is free,go to a music store and ask for an old acoustic guitar string the diameter you desire or from musician friend or buy a steel string for guitar.
 Alan


________________________________
From: Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 9, 2012 8:57 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods


 

Let's see now, 0.025 in. wire is equivalent to 2.25 in. in HO scale. Those
are some bodacious truss rods!

Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
robertm
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2012 6:47 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Modeling truss rods

At the recommendation of a modeler better than me I used

.025" music wire from K&S Engineering. You can find it at Walthers.

The good thing about this is its steel just like the prototype.

Bob Moeller

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "EdwardM"
<ed_mines@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "robertm"
<robertmoeller47@> wrote:
In the end I used music wire.
What diameter did you use and where did you get it?

Ed Mines


Re: History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling

Andy Harman
 

At 04:39 PM 5/9/2012 +0000, you wrote:

Materials related to Roller Bearing models--instructions, ads, kit lists, etc. It would especially be helpful to know when they started advertising. Also photos of built-up models.
I bought an RBM kit around 1977. I think it was a tank car. I ebayed it some years ago unbuilt. I don't think that was their first kit though.

The seminal styrene kit I think it could be argued was the "Innovative Model Works" 1937 boxcar kit. When was this kit introduced. Does anyone have any good stories about the development of this model by Jerry Porter they can send me?
Did that predate the Intermountain Canadian Cylindrical?

My recollection of the first attempt outside the box by an upstart kit maker was the 70-ton ACF covered hopper by E&B Valley which was released in 1980 I believe. It was at the 1980 MRIA show that I first encountered Westerfield. The E&B stuff was crude but brought back the flat kit concept for a while, which allowed new prototypes to be tooled for less $$ than the one-piece standard Athearn was using.

Hard to believe that in the mid 1970s Athearn was so dominant that on any given layout 90 or even 100% of the freight cars were Athearn or Athearn based.

I suppose any history of prototype freight car modeling has to cover oopsies like the Gould tank car. Certainly a milestone in tooling refinement, if not prototypical accuracy.

One thing I've often wondered about is the lack of builder's photos after the steam era. It seems like the practice of taking high quality photos of the class car at the builder faded quickly after 1960. Either that or else they are simply not as accessible as the earlier ones. That has created a considerable gap between this era and the digital camera / film-free era in terms of coverage. Modeling the 1940s and 50s seems to actually be easier than modeling the 60s and 70s - not just in terms of available models but in terms of available photos.

I am planning to talk about this history from the 1/87th scale perspective because that is what I know. Tentatively this will be a presentation at Naperville and Cocoa Beach and I will consider how to make the presentation available to others for them to do a presentation.
Now this I'd sit still in a crowded stuffy room for :-) I rarely attend clinics but this one I wouldn't miss. Keep us posted... I hope to be making Naperville this year and of course Cocoa next year to keep my streak alive.

Andy


History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling Gould/TichyIMWX timeframe.

Andy Carlson
 

I was a younger Prototype modeler in 1987 when I met a gracious influential
gentleman at the Eugene, OR. NMRA convention. The Westrail kits he developed and
marketed were real eye-openers for me. Later, his scholarly writings in various
modeling magazines cemented his stature as the greatest Prototype pioneer in
Model Railroading.


Another item worthy of mention: back then, the McKeen double door 40' boxcar
raised the bar high enough that later Intermountain, Red Caboose and other
companies had higher standards to reach. We are all better off now because of
this pioneering styrene freight car.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Let's talk about ladders.

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I'm always interested in better ladders (at any price). Please keep me in the loop on this.

Bill Pardie

On May 9, 2012, at 4:35 AM, Rob Kirkham wrote:

I've printed off a set of ladders using rapid prototyping. They have scale
stiles, .2 mm rungs and (as they are for Canadian boxcars) built in place
stirrup steps which at .3 mm thickness are noticeably closer to scale than
anything I have used - molded or etched. They are flexible, rugged to a
degree - and take paint well. I'll try to post a photo this evening when I
get home from work. The price isn't cheap, but they allow one to design any
style of ladder imaginable.

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: <jerryglow@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2012 7:21 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Let's talk about ladders.

The PE stiles w/ wire rungs approach would allow for wider ladders used by
some but individual artwork (easy enough) would have to be done for
different rung spacing.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:

Lately I've been thinking about available car ladders.
Generally, I'm not pleased with the overall quality of most of the
commercial offerings. Badly rendered rungs, oversized stiles, etc.
So I'd like to generate an informal poll here, to try and establish if
there's a desire for better ladders and what form that might take.

I'm particularly fond of the approach Ted Cullotta took with the Miner
ladders in the Wabash AAR kitbash in a box. He supplied a set of
photo-etched stiles that had the holes for grabs etched in and the
modeler had to bend the stile into the angle shape and insert individual
rungs from wire. Tedious but very effective. Looks great as well!

Another approach is to etch the entire ladder, while still requiring the
stiles to be folded to create the correct angle look. The downside is the
rungs are flat in profile.

The first etched approach would also create an option for a variety of
rung spacings.

What's your thoughts?

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling

Andy Carlson
 

Hi Bill,

Epoxy was the material Bill Clouser used for his castings, even to the end of
his casting career. When I first saw his O scale Dreadnaught end castings, I was
convinced that Bill must have been God.

The IMWX car was tooled by Frank Bromer of Intermountain as a "divorce
settlement", in lieu of cash, when Jerry left Intermountain as a founding
partner.

And please, don't forget Al Armitage's contributions to our hobby; without
styrene few resin kits would have made it to market.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA





________________________________
From: lnbill <fgexbill@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wed, May 9, 2012 9:39:47 AM
Subject: [STMFC] History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling


As some of you will remember from posts I made in the fall of 2011, I want to
put together materials to create a history of modeling freight cars more
accurately and more prototypically. I now have some good materials about the
early offerings of Al Westerfield and the materials that publicized the releases
of Westrail and Dennis Storzek. F&C is putting some materials together for me
and I will be talking w/Martin about Sunshine's initial offerings.

Here are somethings I need your help with.

Materials related to Roller Bearing models--instructions, ads, kit lists, etc.
It would especially be helpful to know when they started advertising. Also
photos of built-up models.

Materials related to the Rail Progress hopper kits. (Do I have the correct name
for this line?) Again built up model photos would be appreciated.

It could be argued that two seminal articles related to how our niche in the
hobby has developed were Dennis Storzek's article on 5 things to do to improve
existing styrene freight car models. This appeared sometime in the 1980's. Can
someone provide scans of this article?

Bill Clouser's articles on using rubber molds and polyester (was that the
material?) to make copies of parts, components, etc. Not sure of the dates or
how many articles there were. Ned scans of at least one of these.

Arguably Prototype Modeler magazine helped change the thinking and orientation
for some of us. I would love to have scans of the cover of the first few issues
of this.

The seminal styrene kit I think it could be argued was the "Innovative Model
Works" 1937 boxcar kit. When was this kit introduced. Does anyone have any good
stories about the development of this model by Jerry Porter they can send me?

Can anyone furnish me with info about the beginnings of McKean, Front Range, and
C&BT, i.e. the people involved, initial offerings, and or course nicely built up
models.

Anecdotes about these pioneering styrene efforts and the people involved would
be appreciated.

One more item and this may start an argument. Do we know who night have first
used the term "Prototype" to describe the approach to what we are doing, either
specifically to modeling, or more generally to the model railroading hobby.


I am planning to talk about this history from the 1/87th scale perspective
because that is what I know. Tentatively this will be a presentation at
Naperville and Cocoa Beach and I will consider how to make the presentation
available to others for them to do a presentation.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727-470-9930
fgexbill@...




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling

Bill Welch
 

Speaking of RPI and NEB&W, John Nehrich's Shop Talks had a big influence on me. Does anyone have a copy of the first issue or alternatively an early issue from which they could scan the cover and a few pages and send to me?

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "Rossiter, Mark W" <Mark.Rossiter@...> wrote:

There was a flurry articles by various members of the RPI's NEB&W club
in the early to mid 1980's that started the ball rolling for me. Not
long after, the Storzek Soo Line and Rutland DS box car kits in resin
came along. That was when I turned my back on Athearn blue box kits
forever.



- - Mark





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling Gould/TichyIMWX timeframe.

Bill Welch
 

Tom:

I am sure the Gould/Tichy kits were first. While their die work was/is at a very level, I would argue that the IMWX model kit had greater impact because they were available with accurate paint and stenciling. Conversely the Gould/Tichy kits with a few exception have never been well supported with such essentials as decals, leaving it up to the modeler to sort out completing the model. The few examples they supported with decals featured poor quality decals.

That is my observation at least.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., tyesac@... wrote:


Bill,

Which came first IMWX cars of the Gould (later Tichy) cars? I thought the Gould cars camme first.

Tom Casey


The seminal styrene kit I think it could be argued was the "Innovative Model Works" 1937 boxcar kit. When was this kit introduced. Does anyone have any good stories about the development of this model by Jerry Porter they can send me?






-----Original Message-----
From: lnbill <fgexbill@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wed, May 9, 2012 11:39 am
Subject: [STMFC] History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling




As some of you will remember from posts I made in the fall of 2011, I want to put together materials to create a history of modeling freight cars more accurately and more prototypically. I now have some good materials about the early offerings of Al Westerfield and the materials that publicized the releases of Westrail and Dennis Storzek. F&C is putting some materials together for me and I will be talking w/Martin about Sunshine's initial offerings.

Here are somethings I need your help with.

Materials related to Roller Bearing models--instructions, ads, kit lists, etc. It would especially be helpful to know when they started advertising. Also photos of built-up models.

Materials related to the Rail Progress hopper kits. (Do I have the correct name for this line?) Again built up model photos would be appreciated.

It could be argued that two seminal articles related to how our niche in the hobby has developed were Dennis Storzek's article on 5 things to do to improve existing styrene freight car models. This appeared sometime in the 1980's. Can someone provide scans of this article?

Bill Clouser's articles on using rubber molds and polyester (was that the material?) to make copies of parts, components, etc. Not sure of the dates or how many articles there were. Ned scans of at least one of these.

Arguably Prototype Modeler magazine helped change the thinking and orientation for some of us. I would love to have scans of the cover of the first few issues of this.

The seminal styrene kit I think it could be argued was the "Innovative Model Works" 1937 boxcar kit. When was this kit introduced. Does anyone have any good stories about the development of this model by Jerry Porter they can send me?

Can anyone furnish me with info about the beginnings of McKean, Front Range, and C&BT, i.e. the people involved, initial offerings, and or course nicely built up models.

Anecdotes about these pioneering styrene efforts and the people involved would be appreciated.

One more item and this may start an argument. Do we know who night have first used the term "Prototype" to describe the approach to what we are doing, either specifically to modeling, or more generally to the model railroading hobby.

I am planning to talk about this history from the 1/87th scale perspective because that is what I know. Tentatively this will be a presentation at Naperville and Cocoa Beach and I will consider how to make the presentation available to others for them to do a presentation.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727-470-9930
fgexbill@...









Re: History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:


Bill Clouser's articles on using rubber molds and polyester (was that the material?) to make copies of parts, components, etc. Not sure of the dates or how many articles there were. Ned scans of at least one of these.

All Clouser's models were aluminum filled "tooling" epoxy.

Dennis


History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling

gary laakso
 

Don't forget the Central Valley one-piece plastic under bodies to upgrade all the blue box Atheran and Roundhouse boxcars. I must have purchased a dozen to upgrade plastic boxcars and they came in handy when resin kits let the builder place the components on the underframe.


gary laakso
south of Mike Brock

----- Original Message -----
From: lnbill
To: STMFC@...
Sent: 5/9/2012 12:39:44 PM
Subject: [STMFC] History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling



As some of you will remember from posts I made in the fall of 2011, I want to put together materials to create a history of modeling freight cars more accurately and more prototypically. I now have some good materials about the early offerings of Al Westerfield and the materials that publicized the releases of Westrail and Dennis Storzek. F&C is putting some materials together for me and I will be talking w/Martin about Sunshine's initial offerings.

Here are somethings I need your help with.

Materials related to Roller Bearing models--instructions, ads, kit lists, etc. It would especially be helpful to know when they started advertising. Also photos of built-up models.

Materials related to the Rail Progress hopper kits. (Do I have the correct name for this line?) Again built up model photos would be appreciated.

It could be argued that two seminal articles related to how our niche in the hobby has developed were Dennis Storzek's article on 5 things to do to improve existing styrene freight car models. This appeared sometime in the 1980's. Can someone provide scans of this article?

Bill Clouser's articles on using rubber molds and polyester (was that the material?) to make copies of parts, components, etc. Not sure of the dates or how many articles there were. Ned scans of at least one of these.

Arguably Prototype Modeler magazine helped change the thinking and orientation for some of us. I would love to have scans of the cover of the first few issues of this.

The seminal styrene kit I think it could be argued was the "Innovative Model Works" 1937 boxcar kit. When was this kit introduced. Does anyone have any good stories about the development of this model by Jerry Porter they can send me?

Can anyone furnish me with info about the beginnings of McKean, Front Range, and C&BT, i.e. the people involved, initial offerings, and or course nicely built up models.

Anecdotes about these pioneering styrene efforts and the people involved would be appreciated.

One more item and this may start an argument. Do we know who night have first used the term "Prototype" to describe the approach to what we are doing, either specifically to modeling, or more generally to the model railroading hobby.

I am planning to talk about this history from the 1/87th scale perspective because that is what I know. Tentatively this will be a presentation at Naperville and Cocoa Beach and I will consider how to make the presentation available to others for them to do a presentation.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727-470-9930
fgexbill@...


Re: History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling

Armand Premo
 

Please do not forget the work of the RPI group.'They were pioneers.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: lnbill
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 09, 2012 12:39 PM
Subject: [STMFC] History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling



As some of you will remember from posts I made in the fall of 2011, I want to put together materials to create a history of modeling freight cars more accurately and more prototypically. I now have some good materials about the early offerings of Al Westerfield and the materials that publicized the releases of Westrail and Dennis Storzek. F&C is putting some materials together for me and I will be talking w/Martin about Sunshine's initial offerings.

Here are somethings I need your help with.

Materials related to Roller Bearing models--instructions, ads, kit lists, etc. It would especially be helpful to know when they started advertising. Also photos of built-up models.

Materials related to the Rail Progress hopper kits. (Do I have the correct name for this line?) Again built up model photos would be appreciated.

It could be argued that two seminal articles related to how our niche in the hobby has developed were Dennis Storzek's article on 5 things to do to improve existing styrene freight car models. This appeared sometime in the 1980's. Can someone provide scans of this article?

Bill Clouser's articles on using rubber molds and polyester (was that the material?) to make copies of parts, components, etc. Not sure of the dates or how many articles there were. Ned scans of at least one of these.

Arguably Prototype Modeler magazine helped change the thinking and orientation for some of us. I would love to have scans of the cover of the first few issues of this.

The seminal styrene kit I think it could be argued was the "Innovative Model Works" 1937 boxcar kit. When was this kit introduced. Does anyone have any good stories about the development of this model by Jerry Porter they can send me?

Can anyone furnish me with info about the beginnings of McKean, Front Range, and C&BT, i.e. the people involved, initial offerings, and or course nicely built up models.

Anecdotes about these pioneering styrene efforts and the people involved would be appreciated.

One more item and this may start an argument. Do we know who night have first used the term "Prototype" to describe the approach to what we are doing, either specifically to modeling, or more generally to the model railroading hobby.

I am planning to talk about this history from the 1/87th scale perspective because that is what I know. Tentatively this will be a presentation at Naperville and Cocoa Beach and I will consider how to make the presentation available to others for them to do a presentation.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727-470-9930
fgexbill@...


Re: History of Prototype Freight Car Modeling

midrly <midrly@...>
 

A lot of those articles were in Mainline Modeler, a magazine that for the time produced some cutting edge modelling, IMHO.

Two gentlemen on this list should take a bow here.

I have two of Dennis Storzek's CN steel-frame boxcars. Still to me, one of the nicest, best detailed, and easy-to-assemble resin kits that I've ever built.

Al Westerfield was a prolific maker of resin kits, which were likewise easy to build, and dead accurate models. What can I add? Still nice models by today's standards.

Gould Company was likely the first to make a well-detailed styrene kit in HO that was better than brass in detail. I don't know the chronological order, but the 120-ton Industrial wrecking crane and USRA steel-frame boxcar were leaders in commercially made prototype STMFC kits. And Gould's tank car, though a model of a car which was never built, nonetheless set a new standard for a STMFC model. Criticise it all that you want to--how many of us on this list that model in HO scale don't have at least one?? Tweak the Tichy tank car kit a little, and it makes a nice "War Emergency" car.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Rossiter, Mark W" <Mark.Rossiter@...> wrote:

There was a flurry articles by various members of the RPI's NEB&W club
in the early to mid 1980's that started the ball rolling for me. Not
long after, the Storzek Soo Line and Rutland DS box car kits in resin
came along. That was when I turned my back on Athearn blue box kits
forever.



- - Mark





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Kadee's new generation of trucks

Craig Zeni
 

On May 9, 2012, at 12:48 PM, STMFC@... wrote:
6c. Re: Kadee's new generation of trucks
Posted by: "Andy Harman" gsgondola@...
Date: Wed May 9, 2012 9:17 am ((PDT))

At 07:15 PM 5/8/2012 -0700, you wrote:
to the track, making them easier to re-rail. All in all, the kind of
engineering excellence we have come to expect from Kadee, and they
are gradually replacing the older trucks with them.
Has anyone installed code 88 wheels in these yet? I was looking at the
Reboxx web site and they recommended a 1.115" axle length for the older
Kadee trucks. I tried them in a pair of the new A3s and there is too much
play - although the Kadee axle measures at about 1.115" tip to tip, the
smaller diameter and point on the Reboxx axle just rattles around in the
Kadee journal. I'm thinking they're going to need 1.125 or 1.130. My
current policy on code 88 wheels is that I will try to always use them on
any open-ended car... hopper, tank car, etc where the wheel profile is
visible, and I'll use them on a box car or gondola if the kit comes with
them in the correct trucks but otherwise I'll use code 110.
Why not use the ones designed to fit - the Kadee Code 88 wheels?

http://www.kadee.com/htmbord/page530.htm
http://www.kadee.com/htmbord/page533.htm

With the HGC sideframes the Kadee trucks roll as well as anything on the market....very smooth runners.

I'll also second the comment on Peter Aue's drill template for the Kadee bracket grabs...

CZ
NC


Re: Kadee's new generation of trucks

Richard Hendrickson
 

On May 9, 2012, at 9:17 AM, Andy Harman wrote:

Has anyone installed code 88 wheels in these yet?
Kadee's own code 88 wheels work just fine, and the trucks are
available with them (or soon will be)

Richard Hendrickson

86061 - 86080 of 194817