Date   

Re: Scott Pitzer C&O Rebuild

Scott Pitzer
 

Do we know which shop(s) did the rebuilding? Circa 1951-53 they SHOULD have carried roman lettering, spelled-out road name, and the first version of the Progress logo. But former PM shops lagged behind as far as stencils and diagrams-- so the use of a logo may not be a sure thing.
(And the "new ends" referred to, seemed to be Pullman-Standard PS-1 style.)
Scott Pitzer


Re: Scott Pitzer C&O Rebuild

al_brown03
 

Can't speak to the rebuild date, but as far as the paint scheme ... they wouldn't have been C&O cars until the C&O/PM merger ('47).

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., "Charles Hostetler" <cesicjh@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "Pieter_Roos" <pieter_roos@> wrote:
Thanks for the reply, but I don't think a car rebuilt in 1940 would have a diagonal panel roof or post war type Youngstown doors. I guess something slipped in the caption, unless the cars were rebuilt twice.

Hi Pieter,

I agree with your observation. I was suspicious of this caption myself (and there are other typos on that page), but I haven't been able to find a more authoritative source. IF the rebuild date could be established to be post-1947 my guess would be that the 1st generation "For Progress" in white on box car brown would have been the delivery scheme.

The 1953 ORER does list:

289350 to 290349 All Steel XM (548 total), as well as
259350 to 290349 Steel Underframe XM (69 total) which are referred to as Class "B" construction

Maybe the rebuilding took place over a period of several years?

Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Re: No Sunshine at Naperville!!

Dave Sarther
 

Jim

Through the years Martin has certainly a force in the hobby. He, much like several others, has brought many hours of satisfaction to freight car builders and participants at the Naperville Meets. Wishing Martin and Trisha all the best. Somehow the meet will not be the same without his participation and presence.

Later, Dave Sarther

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Hayes <jimhayes97225@...>
To: Stm Frt Cars <STMFC@...>; RPM Forum <RPM-forum@...>
Sent: Mon, Sep 24, 2012 2:22 pm
Subject: [STMFC] No Sunshine at Naperville!!





Martin Lofton just called and asked me to spread the word that Sunshine
will not be at Naperville this year. Martin is going into the hospital for
some checks. One of his medications has weakened his muscles a lot.

No new kits this year, Maybe next year.
Orders in house will continue to be processed. New orders, especially close
outs, will be accepted.
There will be more closeout lists. I haven't seen them yet.

More news when I know more.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Scott Pitzer C&O Rebuild

David
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Pieter_Roos" <pieter_roos@...> wrote:

A couple of questions: the article says the cars were converted from Pere Marquette auto cars in number series 89359-90349 "in the early 1950s". Does someone have a more exact date?
1951 and later. Some of these also got new ends, so check those photos.

David Thompson


Re: Scott Pitzer C&O Rebuild

Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Pieter_Roos" <pieter_roos@...> wrote:
Thanks for the reply, but I don't think a car rebuilt in 1940 would have a diagonal panel roof or post war type Youngstown doors. I guess something slipped in the caption, unless the cars were rebuilt twice.

Hi Pieter,

I agree with your observation. I was suspicious of this caption myself (and there are other typos on that page), but I haven't been able to find a more authoritative source. IF the rebuild date could be established to be post-1947 my guess would be that the 1st generation "For Progress" in white on box car brown would have been the delivery scheme.

The 1953 ORER does list:

289350 to 290349 All Steel XM (548 total), as well as
259350 to 290349 Steel Underframe XM (69 total) which are referred to as Class "B" construction

Maybe the rebuilding took place over a period of several years?

Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Re: Photo and negative collections

william darnaby
 

Charlie's collection went to Bill Raia after Charlie died and Bill listed
them along with his own.

Bill Darnaby

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
arrphoto
Sent: Sunday, September 23, 2012 8:03 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Photo and negative collections

I've always wondered what happened to the Charlie Felstad (sp?) collection.


Curt Fortenberry


Re: Scott Pitzer C&O Rebuild

Pieter Roos
 

Hi Charles;

Thanks for the reply, but I don't think a car rebuilt in 1940 would have a diagonal panel roof or post war type Youngstown doors. I guess something slipped in the caption, unless the cars were rebuilt twice.

I do appreciate your checking for me. The P&L info is helpful.

Pieter Roos
Connecticut

--- In STMFC@..., "Charles Hostetler" <cesicjh@...> wrote:

...In STMFC@..., "Pieter_Roos" <pieter_roos@> wrote:
A couple of questions: the article says the cars were converted from Pere Marquette auto cars in number series 89359-90349 "in the early 1950s". Does someone have a more exact date?

Also, the illustrations show a prototype car in black paint with white "for Progress" lettering, and the model is freight car brown with white "for Progress" which the author states is 1960's lettering. What would the paint scheme have been when first rebuilt?

Hi Pieter,

In David Hickcox's C&O Color Guide there's a photo of C&O 289471 attributed to the Mike Del Vecchio Collection taken at an unknown location in 1955. The caption says

"Rebuilt in 1940, the 289471 has an inside length of 40'6"..."

The car is heavily weathered and the reweigh date is not legible (to me anyway). The lettering is a white 1st generation "For Progress" on freight car brown. The P&L in the photo may date as early as late 1940s but not 1940 (if the caption is correct about the rebuild date).

Not a complete answer but I just happened to be working on this book when I saw your query.

Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Re: No Sunshine at Naperville!!

Clark Propst
 

Wow! I was just making out my list.
Stan Rydarowicz called today and heard that Martin was feeling poorly.

Best wishes to him.

Clark Propst


No Sunshine at Naperville!!

Jim Hayes
 

Martin Lofton just called and asked me to spread the word that Sunshine
will not be at Naperville this year. Martin is going into the hospital for
some checks. One of his medications has weakened his muscles a lot.

No new kits this year, Maybe next year.
Orders in house will continue to be processed. New orders, especially close
outs, will be accepted.
There will be more closeout lists. I haven't seen them yet.

More news when I know more.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com


Re: Photo of PT on SP flat

Bruce Smith
 

And in case you wanted the loading diagram for upright loading, there are two online at:
http://railroadmanuals.tpub.com/TM-55-2200-001-12/css/TM-55-2200-001-12_116.htm - in cradles
http://railroadmanuals.tpub.com/TM-55-2200-001-12/css/TM-55-2200-001-12_120.htm

Note that there is photographic evidence for these being loaded on their side as well.

And for kicks, check out the main index at http://railroadmanuals.tpub.com/TM-55-2200-001-12/

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

__

/ &#92;

__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________

|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |

| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||

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On Sep 24, 2012, at 11:21 AM, lnbill wrote:

I could not find the LCM but here is the LCVP from the HobbyLinc page.

http://www.hobbylinc.com/htm/tdn/tdn87065.htm

Leave the .30 Cals, etc. off of coarse. These were in use at least thru the Korea War. They were designed by Andrew Higgins and built in the Big Easy, where the D-Day museum is today because of these boats, also known as Higgins Boats. These and the GMC "Deuce and a Half" truck were major contributors to Allied Victory in WWII.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "Bruce F. Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

John,

I have the Trident model on the shelf, ready to build, along with an earlier LCVP from a different company. Since they are slightly different in size, they'll need to not go next to each other in a train <G>. Now to find the time to build the kits, build the flats for them to go on and mount the loads. Since I'm talking about these types of loads at the NMRA national in Atlanta, I guess I have a deadline ;^)


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

__

/ &#92;

__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________

|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |

| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||

|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|

| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0



On Sep 24, 2012, at 1:50 AM, northbaylines@...<mailto:northbaylines@...> wrote:

Bruce,

You are most likely correct regarding an in-plant move. Notice the lack of propellors on the shafts and incomplete deck houses. It would still make an impressive model, even if not used in service.

What are documented loads transported to the east and west coasts, sometimes in large blocks of cars, are LCVP and LCM landing craft. The SP Trainline issue on WWII has a photo of a string of flats loaded with LCVPs in an SP train over Donner Pass.

Trident makes HO scale resin replicas of both craft. Very pricey for a unit train but at least available accurately scaled.

John Barry
Cotati, CA
--- In STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...>, "Bruce F. Smith" <smithbf@> wrote:

Folks, John,

Very cool photo. But before you go running off to model this PT boat, you might want to do a little more investigating. For example, the PT-201, being a Higgins 78' class, had a beam of slightly over 20'. A close examination of the photo of PT-210 confirms that it extends substantially over the sides of the car. Such a load would be extremely difficult to transport any distance and therefore is most likely being readied for or from a local move (in plant, or perhaps from plant to water for launch). It seems unlikely to me that this PT boat traveled any distance at all by rail.

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...> [STMFC@...] on behalf of John Barry [northbaylines@]
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2012 11:53 PM
To: Espee@...<mailto:Espee@...>; SouthernPacific@...<mailto:SouthernPacific@...>; STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Photo of PT on SP flat

An interesting wartime load. Photo was taken at the Higgens shipyard in Louisianna circa 1942 of PT201 on flat car SP 79571. See the photo on my blog at:
http://northbaylines.blogspot.com/2012/09/wartime-flat-car-loads-update_14.html#!/2012/09/wartime-flat-car-loads-update_14.html

Does anyoe make a model of this 53 foot flat?

John Barry

ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights
Cotati, CA





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Re: Photo of PT on SP flat

Bill Welch
 

I could not find the LCM but here is the LCVP from the HobbyLinc page.

http://www.hobbylinc.com/htm/tdn/tdn87065.htm

Leave the .30 Cals, etc. off of coarse. These were in use at least thru the Korea War. They were designed by Andrew Higgins and built in the Big Easy, where the D-Day museum is today because of these boats, also known as Higgins Boats. These and the GMC "Deuce and a Half" truck were major contributors to Allied Victory in WWII.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "Bruce F. Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

John,

I have the Trident model on the shelf, ready to build, along with an earlier LCVP from a different company. Since they are slightly different in size, they'll need to not go next to each other in a train <G>. Now to find the time to build the kits, build the flats for them to go on and mount the loads. Since I'm talking about these types of loads at the NMRA national in Atlanta, I guess I have a deadline ;^)


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

__

/ &#92;

__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________

|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |

| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||

|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|

| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0



On Sep 24, 2012, at 1:50 AM, northbaylines@...<mailto:northbaylines@...> wrote:

Bruce,

You are most likely correct regarding an in-plant move. Notice the lack of propellors on the shafts and incomplete deck houses. It would still make an impressive model, even if not used in service.

What are documented loads transported to the east and west coasts, sometimes in large blocks of cars, are LCVP and LCM landing craft. The SP Trainline issue on WWII has a photo of a string of flats loaded with LCVPs in an SP train over Donner Pass.

Trident makes HO scale resin replicas of both craft. Very pricey for a unit train but at least available accurately scaled.

John Barry
Cotati, CA
--- In STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...>, "Bruce F. Smith" <smithbf@> wrote:

Folks, John,

Very cool photo. But before you go running off to model this PT boat, you might want to do a little more investigating. For example, the PT-201, being a Higgins 78' class, had a beam of slightly over 20'. A close examination of the photo of PT-210 confirms that it extends substantially over the sides of the car. Such a load would be extremely difficult to transport any distance and therefore is most likely being readied for or from a local move (in plant, or perhaps from plant to water for launch). It seems unlikely to me that this PT boat traveled any distance at all by rail.

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...> [STMFC@...] on behalf of John Barry [northbaylines@]
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2012 11:53 PM
To: Espee@...<mailto:Espee@...>; SouthernPacific@...<mailto:SouthernPacific@...>; STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Photo of PT on SP flat

An interesting wartime load. Photo was taken at the Higgens shipyard in Louisianna circa 1942 of PT201 on flat car SP 79571. See the photo on my blog at:
http://northbaylines.blogspot.com/2012/09/wartime-flat-car-loads-update_14.html#!/2012/09/wartime-flat-car-loads-update_14.html

Does anyoe make a model of this 53 foot flat?

John Barry

ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights
Cotati, CA

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Re: Transporting Hogs On The UP

Douglas Harding
 

Tom, I believe I have seen a photo of livestock in a baggage car, so it is
not out of the realm of possibility. Breeding stock was certainly treated
differently than feed lot or market ready animals. Most generally such
animals were crated or secured with a halter rope, not allowed to roam
loose. And I just image the reaction to the hog manure that accompanied the
hog.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Transporting Hogs On The UP

Thomas Baker
 

________________________________________

Was it an anomaly to transport hogs in a passenger baggage car? Back in the Eighties I interviewed a former station agent for the Chicago Great Western, who worked on the west end, Oelwein to Council Bluffs. He related that several times he and presumably the hog raiser led a hog or two up a ramp into a baggage car for transport. I never thought about it before, but I would assume that a hog worthy of transport in a baggage car was not headed to the butchering plant but would be used for breeding.

Tom


Re: Photo of PT on SP flat

Bruce Smith
 

John,

I have the Trident model on the shelf, ready to build, along with an earlier LCVP from a different company. Since they are slightly different in size, they'll need to not go next to each other in a train <G>. Now to find the time to build the kits, build the flats for them to go on and mount the loads. Since I'm talking about these types of loads at the NMRA national in Atlanta, I guess I have a deadline ;^)


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

__

/ &#92;

__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________

|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |

| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||

|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|

| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0

On Sep 24, 2012, at 1:50 AM, northbaylines@...<mailto:northbaylines@...> wrote:

Bruce,

You are most likely correct regarding an in-plant move. Notice the lack of propellors on the shafts and incomplete deck houses. It would still make an impressive model, even if not used in service.

What are documented loads transported to the east and west coasts, sometimes in large blocks of cars, are LCVP and LCM landing craft. The SP Trainline issue on WWII has a photo of a string of flats loaded with LCVPs in an SP train over Donner Pass.

Trident makes HO scale resin replicas of both craft. Very pricey for a unit train but at least available accurately scaled.

John Barry
Cotati, CA
--- In STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...>, "Bruce F. Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

Folks, John,

Very cool photo. But before you go running off to model this PT boat, you might want to do a little more investigating. For example, the PT-201, being a Higgins 78' class, had a beam of slightly over 20'. A close examination of the photo of PT-210 confirms that it extends substantially over the sides of the car. Such a load would be extremely difficult to transport any distance and therefore is most likely being readied for or from a local move (in plant, or perhaps from plant to water for launch). It seems unlikely to me that this PT boat traveled any distance at all by rail.

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...> [STMFC@...] on behalf of John Barry [northbaylines@...]
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2012 11:53 PM
To: Espee@...<mailto:Espee@...>; SouthernPacific@...<mailto:SouthernPacific@...>; STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Photo of PT on SP flat

An interesting wartime load. Photo was taken at the Higgens shipyard in Louisianna circa 1942 of PT201 on flat car SP 79571. See the photo on my blog at:
http://northbaylines.blogspot.com/2012/09/wartime-flat-car-loads-update_14.html#!/2012/09/wartime-flat-car-loads-update_14.html

Does anyoe make a model of this 53 foot flat?

John Barry

ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights
Cotati, CA





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Re: Photo of PT on SP flat

John Barry
 

Bruce,

You are most likely correct regarding an in-plant move. Notice the lack of propellors on the shafts and incomplete deck houses. It would still make an impressive model, even if not used in service.

What are documented loads transported to the east and west coasts, sometimes in large blocks of cars, are LCVP and LCM landing craft. The SP Trainline issue on WWII has a photo of a string of flats loaded with LCVPs in an SP train over Donner Pass.

Trident makes HO scale resin replicas of both craft. Very pricey for a unit train but at least available accurately scaled.

John Barry
Cotati, CA

--- In STMFC@..., "Bruce F. Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

Folks, John,

Very cool photo. But before you go running off to model this PT boat, you might want to do a little more investigating. For example, the PT-201, being a Higgins 78' class, had a beam of slightly over 20'. A close examination of the photo of PT-210 confirms that it extends substantially over the sides of the car. Such a load would be extremely difficult to transport any distance and therefore is most likely being readied for or from a local move (in plant, or perhaps from plant to water for launch). It seems unlikely to me that this PT boat traveled any distance at all by rail.

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...] on behalf of John Barry [northbaylines@...]
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2012 11:53 PM
To: Espee@...; SouthernPacific@...; STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Photo of PT on SP flat

An interesting wartime load. Photo was taken at the Higgens shipyard in Louisianna circa 1942 of PT201 on flat car SP 79571. See the photo on my blog at:
http://northbaylines.blogspot.com/2012/09/wartime-flat-car-loads-update_14.html#!/2012/09/wartime-flat-car-loads-update_14.html

Does anyoe make a model of this 53 foot flat?

John Barry

ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights
Cotati, CA

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Re: Photo and negative collections

arrphoto <arrphoto@...>
 

I've always wondered what happened to the Charlie Felstad (sp?) collection.

Curt Fortenberry

--- In STMFC@..., water.kresse@... wrote:



In the Midwest --



you have lost Michigan State U Prof Eugene Huddleston (whose collections are "slowly" going to the C&O Historical Society for scanning and originals are then going to the Bentley Library U of Michigan Transportation Library in Ann Arbor)



and



you have, from train show vendor table conversations a few years ago, the collection s of Bob Lorenz  that are in a "limbo" situation where Bob has changed his interests from developing and printing from negatives towards oil painting.

Al Kresse

Romeo, Michigan



----- Original Message -----


From: "Thomas Baker" <bakert@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 1:51:33 PM
Subject: [STMFC] RE: Photo and negative collections

Over the past several years, we have lost a number of photographers and/or collectors of photos and negatives.  Does anyone know what has become of the collections of the following:

1. John Hummeston [I'm not sure of the spelling, but I understand he had a signficiant number of photos and negatives.]

2. Robert Malinoski from the Pittsburgh area.  I'm not sure about the spelling there either, but he also took many photos and slides.

3. Bill Raia purchased many photo and negative collections from others and was a great source of prototypical information.  What has happened to his collection?

Tom

________________________________________



Re: Transporting Hogs On The UP

Bruce Smith
 

Guy,

To add to Gene's explanation, "Shipping Fever Complex" is a respiratory disease complex caused by several organisms that is induced/exacerbated by stress and close quarters.

In general, the shipper worried about any secretions, oral, nasal, urine, feces. All were potential sources of diseases, including shipping fever as well as a variety of diarrheas and other nasties. Bedding cattle headed to market on bedding from other cattle being shipped is a definite no-no and could result in condemnation of the cargo should it get diseased, and claims agains the railroad.

regards
Bruce Smith, (VMD)
Auburn, AL

________________________________________
From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...] on behalf of Guy Wilber [guycwilber@...]
Sent: Saturday, September 22, 2012 8:51 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Transporting Hogs On The UP

John Barry wrote:

As long as the same animals are using the car.

Shippers did not want their stock contaminated by soiled bedding from another stock owner. According to a clinc that Steve Sandifer presented at teh ATSFRRH&MS convention this summer, it was typical for cars to wait and reload their stock to mimimize the labor and materials used for a given shipment.


John,

I missed this post, but am curious what contamination(s) you are referring to?

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Re: Appropriate Western Pacific Caboose For Late 1940s?

spsalso
 

Thom must be in the backyard putting shrimp on the barby. Until he shows up, I'll move this along a bit farther. Here's a model that would do perfectly:

http://www.trainmaster.ch/X-195.htm

It was built in 1944. It would have been a super typical caboose for 1947.

Should you not want to pay the significant bucks and/or wait 'til one shows up, there's this:

http://www.athearn.com/Products/Default.aspx?ProdID=RND84354

It's sorta pretty much kinda close to the WP series 605-616 and 617-628. Please note that these cars weren't painted in this attractive scheme in 1947. If ever. You'll want to strip the paint off and paint it up pretty much like the OMI one noted above. I don't have a picture of these cars in WP, so that's pretty speculative.

All this is my opinion. It might turn out to be ever so slightly. Wrong.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Klasing brakes (was re: RC SOO DD)

Tim O'Connor
 

Gene

Klasing's were applied to NP and MP PS-1's in 1959 & 1960,
so I'd definitely be interested in a good model of a Klasing
brake wheel!

I'll send you photos.

The housings would be nice to have but are not nearly as
important as the brake wheels. Moloco makes a Klasing 1500
housing (crude compared to say, a Detail Associates housing)
that is somewhat similar to the housings seen in the NP & MP
builder photos.

Tim O'Connor

My point here is that we need to be waaaaaay more specific than "Klasing." Personally I'd like to see good renditions of the 525 and 525-A as well as the 700 lever hand brake but I'd really like to know which specific Klasing hand brake interests you.

Please email me off-list as I doubt the others are ready for this level of detail.

Gene Green


Re: RC SOO DD

 

Gene, I will see what I can do. I primarily was looking for lever hand brakes that were used for example on some of the WE gons that Pennsy and NYC had (amongst others). I understand that there can be a large variety just like the Duryea underframes.
 
Rich Christie

From: Gene <bierglaeser@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, September 23, 2012 11:32 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: RC SOO DD


 
Rich,
The first question is lever or vertical wheel?

(Klasing never made a horizontal wheel hand brake in the commonly accepted meaning of the phrase.)

Second question is which specific Klasing hand brake model?

My probably incomplete list of hand brakes shows 56 different Klasing hand brake models. To be more practical, from a modeling standpoint, there are only 9 or 10 models given that differences are internal in many cases. Looking at only 9 or 10 also ignores a few early models (1913-1928) which might well be considered experimental.

If I can't supply a manufacturer with sufficient information, I'm pretty sure I know where such information could be found.

My point here is that we need to be waaaaaay more specific than "Klasing." Personally I'd like to see good renditions of the 525 and 525-A as well as the 700 lever hand brake but I'd really like to know which specific Klasing hand brake interests you.

Please email me off-list as I doubt the others are ready for this level of detail.

Gene Green

87301 - 87320 of 198533