Date   

Re: Kahn's HO scale decals needed

Tom Houle <thoule@...>
 

Larry,
John Hagen at sprinthag@... can help you. He can clean up and
reproduce the old decals.
Tom Houle

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Larry Sexton
Sent: Wednesday, February 08, 2012 9:48 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Kahn's HO scale decals needed

Or three sets since I worked on a model of the same meat reefer over the
last year, to the point all I require are decals to finish. However, since
it's doubtful there is more than one set out there, what are the chances of
someone being able to create a new set of decals for the E.S. Kahn & Sons
applicable for the 1940-44 period?



If anyone is willing to create the decals, I can probably supply a copy of
my early 1940s photo, side view only.



Larry Sexton



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Bruce Smith
Sent: Wednesday, February 08, 2012 10:22 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Kahn's HO scale decals needed





Folks,

Al Brown and I are working on what we think might be one of the last
examples of the PRR RF refer (based on the XL boxcar) in service, circa
1944. These cars were part of the early FGE fleet and were then moved to the
NX fleet. Subsequently, some were leased to Kahn's. Thanks to Al, who
discovered a 1941 photo of EKSX 1046 in a magazine at Prototype Rails this
year, we were able to get a copy of that photo from the Kalmbach Memorial
Library at the NMRA (alas, I can't post it due to ownership issues). It
looks like a small number of these cars remained in service, at least
through the 1943 ORER. The cars appear to have the standard "FGE/NX" style
lettering for "THE E. KAHN'S SONS COMPANY", "EKSX" and "BRINE TANK
REFRIGERATOR" in black on the sides and the reporting marks and number in
white on the ends. While the Brine tank lettering can be had from the 5th
Avenue Car shops NX set, the Kahn's lettering is more problematic.

Both Champ (HR-50) and Walthers made decals that we think would work and we
were wondering if any of you might have one (or better two!) in your stash
that you would be willing to part with? Please email me OFF LIST at smithbf
at auburn.edu.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
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|PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
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------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Alan Monk

Greg Silva
 

Alan - when you have a minute, could you contact me off-list: runeighty at aol dot com. Thanks. Greg.


Re: Kahn's HO scale decals needed

Larry Sexton
 

Or three sets since I worked on a model of the same meat reefer over the
last year, to the point all I require are decals to finish. However, since
it's doubtful there is more than one set out there, what are the chances of
someone being able to create a new set of decals for the E.S. Kahn & Sons
applicable for the 1940-44 period?



If anyone is willing to create the decals, I can probably supply a copy of
my early 1940s photo, side view only.



Larry Sexton



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Bruce Smith
Sent: Wednesday, February 08, 2012 10:22 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Kahn's HO scale decals needed





Folks,

Al Brown and I are working on what we think might be one of the last
examples of the PRR RF refer (based on the XL boxcar) in service, circa
1944. These cars were part of the early FGE fleet and were then moved to the
NX fleet. Subsequently, some were leased to Kahn's. Thanks to Al, who
discovered a 1941 photo of EKSX 1046 in a magazine at Prototype Rails this
year, we were able to get a copy of that photo from the Kalmbach Memorial
Library at the NMRA (alas, I can't post it due to ownership issues). It
looks like a small number of these cars remained in service, at least
through the 1943 ORER. The cars appear to have the standard "FGE/NX" style
lettering for "THE E. KAHN'S SONS COMPANY", "EKSX" and "BRINE TANK
REFRIGERATOR" in black on the sides and the reporting marks and number in
white on the ends. While the Brine tank lettering can be had from the 5th
Avenue Car shops NX set, the Kahn's lettering is more problematic.

Both Champ (HR-50) and Walthers made decals that we think would work and we
were wondering if any of you might have one (or better two!) in your stash
that you would be willing to part with? Please email me OFF LIST at smithbf
at auburn.edu.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: 3-D printer

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Don

Unfortunately my conversion was off by a decimal point, so the precision
still needs to improve by at least 10x (and probably more like 30x-40x) to
get the "smoothness" we expect from current styrene material. Only then
could you cast perfect hat-section braces or Z bars etc. Still, if smaller
printers are popular then we can expect development of even better printers.

Tim O'Connor
Yeah, I wasn't going to point that out... 1/20 of a MM is .002", which is comparable to, but at the gross end of of what other machines are capable of. The also don't deign to tell us the size of the "voxel" (volumetric pixel) they create, nor the positional accuracy of placement. More telling, they don't even show examples of the output... always a bad sign.

On the other hand, specializing on a machine with a build envelope smaller than an engine block allows the machine to be considerably less expensive... and that will allow people who here-to-fore have not considered this process to try to use it. Hopefully, that will drive movement to finer and finer resolution. All the possible uses I can think of... jewelery, masters for dental implants, hearing aid parts, as they mention in the article, would be so much easier if they didn't require hand finishing. If you can generate scanned data at ten times better resolution than the process can build, why would you want it built to the coarser resolution, then have someone hand polish it to only an approximation of the original data? Wouldn't you just want the process to replicate the data?

That's the question that's going to drive the development to the point where it becomes truly useful for our purpose.

Dennis


Kahn's HO scale decals needed

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,

Al Brown and I are working on what we think might be one of the last examples of the PRR RF refer (based on the XL boxcar) in service, circa 1944. These cars were part of the early FGE fleet and were then moved to the NX fleet. Subsequently, some were leased to Kahn's. Thanks to Al, who discovered a 1941 photo of EKSX 1046 in a magazine at Prototype Rails this year, we were able to get a copy of that photo from the Kalmbach Memorial Library at the NMRA (alas, I can't post it due to ownership issues). It looks like a small number of these cars remained in service, at least through the 1943 ORER. The cars appear to have the standard "FGE/NX" style lettering for "THE E. KAHN'S SONS COMPANY", "EKSX" and "BRINE TANK REFRIGERATOR" in black on the sides and the reporting marks and number in white on the ends. While the Brine tank lettering can be had from the 5th Avenue Car shops NX set, the Kahn's lettering is more problematic.

Both Champ (HR-50) and Walthers made decals that we think would work and we were wondering if any of you might have one (or better two!) in your stash that you would be willing to part with? Please email me OFF LIST at smithbf at auburn.edu.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: 3-D printer

Tim O'Connor
 

Don

Unfortunately my conversion was off by a decimal point, so the precision
still needs to improve by at least 10x (and probably more like 30x-40x) to
get the "smoothness" we expect from current styrene material. Only then
could you cast perfect hat-section braces or Z bars etc. Still, if smaller
printers are popular then we can expect development of even better printers.

Tim O'Connor

I don't recall anyone posting about this tiny resin printer yet.
It's accurate to 0.05 mm -- that's about 1/64" in HO scale!

http://www.reghardware.com/2011/05/18/smaller_3d_printers_in_production/

Tim O'Connor

If it will do what the website says it will the making of masters for cast resin kits make be done via computerprogramer and resin in the not too distant future rather than my a modelmaker!

COrdially, Don Valentine


Re: Harvested Rivets on Resin

Monk Alan <Alan.Monk@...>
 

Many thanks Bill, I've a couple of the Accurail SS cars of both 6 and 8 panel types knocking around, will dig those out and make a start on the car over the coming weekend.

And I'm meeting up with one of my resin casting buddies for drinks this evening, I might well get his views on the options around casting a complete roof, assuming I make a decent enough job of the master.

Kindest regards,
Alan,
London, UK

Posted by: "lnbill" fgexbill@... <mailto:fgexbill@...?Subject=%20Re%3A%20Harvested%20Rivets%20on%20Resin> lnbill <http://profiles.yahoo.com/lnbill>

Alan:

It is their 8-panel SS car, any version. I think the 6-panel SS also has the Hutchins roof. I used bits of .005 styrene on the underside of the edge to create the illusion of the thin sheet metal that forms the base of the ribs and wraps around the edge. The roof on my F&C casting fit almost exactly into the body between the ends. I plits the roof down the middle and shimmed it with large dimensions of Evergreen.

As Larry Sexton pointed out recently, it would be a great service if Accurail offered this roof as a separate part.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>, Monk Alan <Alan.Monk@...> wrote:

Hi Bill,

Which Accurail model did you source the Hutchins roof from please?? I've got one of the F&C IC 40'SS cars approaching the top of the 'to build' pile, so any improvement tips or ideas would be most welcome.

Posted by: Bill Welch
Feb 3, 2012 2:19 pm (PST)
In the course of improving and tweaking F&C's little 40-ft IC SS car,
which has included grafting Accurail's most excellent Hutchins roof
on to the car body
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Re: Small scale manufacturing

Tom Madden
 

Jack Burgess wrote:

Thanks for the explanation Dennis. I had assumed that Solidworks would be
more like drafting an isometric view of an object except that you can turn
it around to work on other sides of the object...obviously not so. I think I
will stick to 2D CAD and let others work in Solidworks...
I never sat down one day and decided to learn to solder. Or use an airbrush. Or a lathe or milling machine. Or make a rubber mold. All of my hobby skills developed because my modeling progressed to the point where I needed those skills. So it was with SolidWorks. When I was hired by a local rapid prototyping company because of my resin casting expertise, I looked at their stereolithography machines and thought "Wow! Neat toys! What do I have to learn in order to use them effectively?" So I started working with a site-licensed copy of SolidWorks 2004. The transition from 2D CAD to 3D was pretty straightforward. Almost everything I've designed has started as a 2D sketch on a plane or surface. The sketch then gets extruded into the third dimension to create a solid object, or into (or through) a solid object to form a cut, or revolved about an axis to create (for example) a rivet head or tank car end. The only cases where I've had to create 3D sketches were to form the boundaries of compound curved surfaces ("lofts") for passenger car roof ends.

To be honest, SolidWorks is really overkill, and if it wasn't for the site licensing I couldn't justify the expense. The rest of the company has gone on to later versions, but the 2004 version still does everything I need. (It doesn't have full functionality on my hot new 64-bit Windows 7 PC, though. For example, the function for turning an assembly of many parts into a single part, a necessity for creating the STL output file rapid prototyping processes require, is unavailable. When I get to that roadblock I move the design file to my old 32-bit laptop, which handles that chore very nicely.)

3D CAD is a tool. If you have need of it, go for it. Just be sure you understand _why_ you need it. Designing a part to be created by stereolithography and used as a master for resin casting is different from designing that same part for production in hard tooling by injection molding.

(But it is kinda cool to zoom in and out and spin the design around on your computer screen!)

Tom Madden


Re: IMWX MDT Reefer

steel77086@...
 

Richard,

By any chance, would the MDT ends you refer to be the ones produced
by Stan Ryadowicz ??

Vince Altiere

In a message dated 1/30/2012 8:13:53 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
rhendrickson@... writes:

On Jan 30, 2012, at 3:07 PM, Mark M wrote:
IMWX MDT Reefer would this be correct? R-40-23?
If your reference is to the Intermountain model that represents a PFE
R-40-23, then the answer is no, primarily because the ends are
wrong. IM did a fine job on the body, paint and lettering, however,
and if you change the ends and a couple of other minor details, then
you can have an accurate model of the MDT steel cars built ca.
1947-'49. I've done this but don't remember whose ends I used.

Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: 3-D printer

Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


I don't recall anyone posting about this tiny resin printer yet.
It's accurate to 0.05 mm -- that's about 1/64" in HO scale!

http://www.reghardware.com/2011/05/18/smaller_3d_printers_in_production/

Tim O'Connor

If it will do what the website says it will the making of masters for cast resin kits make be done via computerprogramer and resin in the not too distant future rather than my a modelmaker!

COrdially, Don Valentine


Re: Small scale manufacturing

Tim O'Connor
 

Jack & Dennis

I've lived through 35 years of the constantly changing software development world,
and one thing I've learned is that when you are highly productive with a set of tools
then you stick with them. New things can be added to your tool set if you like, but only
if they make you more productive. IOW "new" is not necessarily "better" -- so I agree
with you. Since I -only- know the basics of isometric drafting I may be able to adapt
to solid modeling more easily -- but I don't know, I'm still very comfortable with 2-D
drawings. Some people at the North Shore club have made amazing 3-D drawings
of the layout and control panels; I don't know what software they used but the results
are impressive, and allow us to see our incredibly complex hidden trackwork in 3-D.

Tim O'

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jack Burgess" <jack@...>

<My solution has been to continue with what I know, as it works.
<Solidworks obviously also has the tools to get you where you need to go,
<but it's a whole different way of thinking from the old drafting table.

Thanks for the explanation Dennis. I had assumed that Solidworks would be
more like drafting an isometric view of an object except that you can turn
it around to work on other sides of the object...obviously not so. I think I
will stick to 2D CAD and let others work in Solidworks...

Jack Burgess


Re: Modeling Hutchins Roofs-was Harvesting Rivets etc

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Steve Lucas" <stevelucas3@...> wrote:

I'm looking at the Sylvan Hutchins roof right now. It does not have the little V-shaped crimps at the ends of the roof ribs. It is also wider than the Accurail Hutchins roof, being designed for a steel boxcar with a wider carbody. So your best choice for a single-sheathed car is to harvest a roof from an Accurail 4100-4199 series kit.
Any of the 4100, 4300, 4500, 7000, 7100, or really old 4000, 4200, or 4400 series kits should give you the roof you want.

http://accurail.com/accurail/

Dennis


Re: Small scale manufacturing

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Dennis wrote:
<I well remember the debates between proponents of "feature-based" and
<"parametric" modeling in the CAD magazines a dozen or so years ago.
<Because of our background in 2-D drafting, Chuck, Jack, and I are all
<more comfortable with feature based modeling... that is, we draw circles
<and lines, to the dimensions we want, and then use these to construct
<the solid or surface (their is a difference) model we need. Parametric
<modelers, such as Solidworks, work the exact opposite. You begin by
<making a sketch of what you want, then add "constraints", dimensions,
<curvature, whatever, to push it and prod it to what you want. This is
<just totally bass-acwards to me, and I'm not very comfortable with it.
<
<The argument for parametric modeling is that it's a better design
<tool... you sketch what you want, add the constraints that are
<important, and everything that is not included in your constraints (and
<therefore must not be important) just falls into place. An example would
<be designing a ball. You sketch a circle, constrain it to be a sphere of
<a given diameter, and you have a baseball. If you want a football, you
<constrain it to have different length major and minor axes, and you have
<a football. The problem is, in our sort of work, we also want to model
<the seams, and the lacing, and... all the sort of things that are really
<feature based.
<
<My solution has been to continue with what I know, as it works.
<Solidworks obviously also has the tools to get you where you need to go,
<but it's a whole different way of thinking from the old drafting table.

Thanks for the explanation Dennis. I had assumed that Solidworks would be
more like drafting an isometric view of an object except that you can turn
it around to work on other sides of the object...obviously not so. I think I
will stick to 2D CAD and let others work in Solidworks...

Jack Burgess


Re: Modeling Hutchins Roofs-was Harvesting Rivets etc

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I'm looking at the Sylvan Hutchins roof right now. It does not have the little V-shaped crimps at the ends of the roof ribs. It is also wider than the Accurail Hutchins roof, being designed for a steel boxcar with a wider carbody. So your best choice for a single-sheathed car is to harvest a roof from an Accurail 4100-4199 series kit.

http://www.accurail.com/accurail/4100.htm

The rooves on these models are a very well-executed model of a Hutchins roof.

If by chance you have a Kaslo CN 40' steel-frame resin boxcar kit, the Hutchins roof in it is a separate piece. This roof is wider than the Accurail roof, but narrower than the Sylvan one. And has the cut-outs in the ribs as well.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

There are Hutchins roofs and there are beautiful Hutchins roofs. The kit come with what is alleged to be a Hutchins roof that lacks the V-shaped crimps on the ribs at the edge of the roof, the bolts that went through the ribs and the small rib-like shape pressed into the center line of each panel. The Sunshine roof on the other IC boxcar I am building has the bolts and the pressed-in rib but it goes to the edge of the roof, which I believe is wrong. It does not have the V-shaped crimp, which I have attempted to model using a razor blade with mediocre results.

If the Sylvan roof matches the details above that are so well rendered on the Accurail version, it may be a good alternative. I do not have one so I cannot say one way or the other. I would love to have a good alternative however.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., Rich C <rhcdmc@> wrote:

Alan, Another thought on the Hutchins roof. Sylvan Scale Models makes a seperate 40' roof.
 
Rich Christie


________________________________
From: Monk Alan <Alan.Monk@>
To: "STMFC@..." <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, February 6, 2012 5:59 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Harvested Rivets on Resin


 
Hi Bill,

Which Accurail model did you source the Hutchins roof from please?? I've got one of the F&C IC 40'SS cars approaching the top of the 'to build' pile, so any improvement tips or ideas would be most welcome.

Kind regards,
Alan Monk,
London, UK

Posted by: Bill Welch
Feb 3, 2012 2:19 pm (PST)
In the course of improving and tweaking F&C's little 40-ft IC SS car,
which has included grafting Accurail's most excellent Hutchins roof
on to the car body, I noticed there is a cluster of rivets missing
along the side sills on the end panels in the approximate position of
the truck bolsters. Where there should be six rivets there are only
three. I have encountered this issue before. Although Archer rivets
might be called for here, first they are too small to match what is
already there and second I can harvest rivets and put them down
quicker than I can decal.

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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: How to upload photos

Tim O'Connor
 

Or if you prefer the unmoderated Wild West to Civilization, you can upload your photos to
http:://groups.yahoo.com/BBFCL or even send them as email attachments, without any moderator
intervention whatever. Then you can email your "permalink" URL's to the STMFC so all the old
folks here can enjoy puttering around in your BBFCL collection... :-)

Tim "immoderate to the last" O'Connor

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeff A Aley" <Jeff.A.Aley@...>

Jared,

One way would be to contact your friendly Deputy Moderator and ask him to upload the pictures on your behalf.

Another way ["Teach a man to fish"] would be as follows:
1) Go to the STMFC Yahoo!Group homepage: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/

2) Click on "Photos" in the blue pane at the left. If you are unable to click "Photos", then look for a link to "log in to Yahoo" below that blue pane on the left. After you've logged in, you should be able to click "Photos".

3) Click on "Add Photo" at the upper right (about two inches down from the top of the window).
Follow the on-screen instructions.

4) Wait for the Moderator or Deputy Moderator to notice and approve your new photo. The photo will not appear until after it has been approved. Experience from certain members (e.g. Clark Propst) indicates that your photos are approved more quickly if you imply that they might be of a Union Pacific freight car.

Regards,

-Jeff Aley
Deputy Moderator, STMFC


Re: Small scale manufacturing

randy arnold
 

I have been following this conversation..I am a mechanical engineer and
have been using Solidworks since version 99, they are now up 2012. I have
version 2010 on my own computer, though I use 2012 at work. I would be
willing to undertake some small projects, but time does get to be an issue.
Next summer I may be retiring which would certainly allow for more time. At
any rate I would be open to discussing some of the things related to this.
For those who are looking for 2D cad there is an excellent program called
Draft Sight which is a free down load at the Solidworks web site. As near
as I can tell Draft Sight has all the features that 2D Auto Cad has, and is
free.


--
Best Regards
Randy


Re: Small scale manufacturing

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Charles R Yungkurth <drgwrail@...> wrote:

I agree with Jack.....a basic knowledge of drafting principles and practices such as projections, sectioning, isometrics, etc. would certainly help.
 
You have to know what you want to use it for before selecting a CAD program. If all you want to do is make simple drawings like floor plans, track plans, electrical skematics, etc. virtually any simple CAD program will do. If what you have is in mind is making drawings to drive a rapid prototyping system you need a 3D CAD program such as solid works. Learning to use this kind of a program is a major task...especially if you don't know anything about product design practices.
 
Solid Works is a massive overkill for the average guy in terms of capabilties. I have been using AutoCAD LT
for almost 20 years now and have done a lot of product design for HO manufacturers. Also doing drwaing for model railroad magaizens but most publishers don't like working from files in CAD formats.But my output cannot go directly to a prid prototyping machine or computer controlled machining equipment.
 
But it is very satisfying to use CAD!
 
Chuck Yungkurth
Boulder CO
Coming in a bit late on this, but...

Chuck, Tim's intent is to construct digital models that can be used to build physical objects via one of the rapid prototyping processes, so yes, he does need to learn 3-D modeling.

I get the feeling that Chuck and Jack are both in the same boat I'm in... we learned conventional drafting, then 2-D CAD, and then went on to 3-D, or at least I did.

I well remember the debates between proponents of "feature-based" and "parametric" modeling in the CAD magazines a dozen or so years ago. Because of our background in 2-D drafting, Chuck, Jack, and I are all more comfortable with feature based modeling... that is, we draw circles and lines, to the dimensions we want, and then use these to construct the solid or surface (their is a difference) model we need. Parametric modelers, such as Solidworks, work the exact opposite. You begin by making a sketch of what you want, then add "constraints", dimensions, curvature, whatever, to push it and prod it to what you want. This is just totally bass-acwards to me, and I'm not very comfortable with it.

The argument for parametric modeling is that it's a better design tool... you sketch what you want, add the constraints that are important, and everything that is not included in your constraints (and therefore must not be important) just falls into place. An example would be designing a ball. You sketch a circle, constrain it to be a sphere of a given diameter, and you have a baseball. If you want a football, you constrain it to have different length major and minor axes, and you have a football. The problem is, in our sort of work, we also want to model the seams, and the lacing, and... all the sort of things that are really feature based.

My solution has been to continue with what I know, as it works. Solidworks obviously also has the tools to get you where you need to go, but it's a whole different way of thinking from the old drafting table.

Dennis


How to upload photos

Aley, Jeff A
 

Jared,

One way would be to contact your friendly Deputy Moderator and ask him to upload the pictures on your behalf.

Another way ["Teach a man to fish"] would be as follows:
1) Go to the STMFC Yahoo!Group homepage: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/

2) Click on "Photos" in the blue pane at the left. If you are unable to click "Photos", then look for a link to "log in to Yahoo" below that blue pane on the left. After you've logged in, you should be able to click "Photos".

3) Click on "Add Photo" at the upper right (about two inches down from the top of the window).
Follow the on-screen instructions.

4) Wait for the Moderator or Deputy Moderator to notice and approve your new photo. The photo will not appear until after it has been approved. Experience from certain members (e.g. Clark Propst) indicates that your photos are approved more quickly if you imply that they might be of a Union Pacific freight car.

Regards,

-Jeff Aley
Deputy Moderator, STMFC



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of JaredH
Sent: Monday, February 06, 2012 8:47 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tell me about this



Ben,

How do I do that?

Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:


Jared Harper asked:
"A friend sent me these pictures and asked if I could identify the car or
car class. I cannot. Can anyone give me input?"

Not without the photos. The list strips attachments - please upload them to the
website so we can all see the photos.


Ben Hom


Re: Union Pacific gives way to battleship Iowa

FRANK PEACOCK
 

I'm on the road so I don't have my WEPL info at hand but Norris City was, of course, a temporary stopping point on the War Emergency P.L. journey to the NY, NJ area which it reached I think in 1943. FHP

To: STMFC@...
From: tnbirke@...
Date: Sun, 5 Feb 2012 15:16:19 -0600
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Union Pacific gives way to battleship Iowa




























There is a good article in the "Central Headlight", Fourth Quarter 1998

about the Central's trains out of Norris City, Illinois to connections to

the East Coast. The available steel ran out at Norris City which was the

northernmost extension of the "Big Inch" pipeline from Longview, TX. From

there the Central shuttled 75 car trains to connections in the east,

commencing in February of 1943.



This is subsequent to the all rail route in which much of the oil came out

of Cushing, OK on the Santa Fe (Second District-Oklahoma Division, Pawhuska

and First Districts- Southern Kansas Division, Third and Second

Districts-Eastern Division) to Kansas City and points beyond. Doubtless the

Katy also ran unit oil trains out of Cushing through Bartlesville and

Parsons to St. Louis also, but I have not seen information on their efforts.



Apparently Union Tank Car and probably the other tank car owners had huge

strings of obsolete tank cars in storage awaiting scrapping that were

quickly reconditioned and put into crude oil service as soon as the Gulf

Coast to East Coast shipping was threatened by German submarines.



Thomas N. Birkett, PE



Southwestern Tank Line, LLC



918-261-1993



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Tell me about this

Jared Harper
 

Ben,

How do I do that?

Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In STMFC@..., Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:


Jared Harper asked:
"A friend sent me these pictures and asked if I could identify the car or
car class. I cannot. Can anyone give me input?"

Not without the photos.  The list strips attachments - please upload them to the
website so we can all see the photos.


Ben Hom

90261 - 90280 of 197080