Date   

Re: Microsale Product

midrly <midrly@...>
 

I've had more luck using repeated applications through the running board grid with either Testors' liquid styrene solvent or Tenax 7R for attaching these running boards.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., timboconnor@... wrote:


I use Krystal Klear for attaching etched roofwalks to box cars!

----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Ehni" <behni@...>

Krystle Kleer is their window filmÅ 

Thanks!
--

Brian P. Ehni



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Weathering Lighter Colored Cars

Bruce Smith
 

Charles,

My daughter Brianna, at the tender age of 5, offered a weathering clinic at a regional NMRA meet here in Alabama. Her words of wisdom on this subject?

"If it is dark, make it lighter, if it is light, make it darker"

The basis for this is the reality of how weathering occurs. Light colored cars tend to show the grime that accumulates, darkening them. Dark colored cars fade, and if the grime is lighter, this also lightens their appearance. To some extent, most cars on a railroad see similar conditions, so the weathering used should blend the cars to a a happy intermediate point. That said, of course, all the cars should NOT look the same as many do travel the country (although those hoppers you are working on usually remain more local) and therefore pick up different weathering colors and of course, different ages of paint should differ in their weathering level.

In addition, it is not a one-technique fits all approach. I use a variety of techniques including acrylic washes, acrylic sprays and chalks, and often use more than one approach per car.


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

__

/ &#92;

__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________

|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |

| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||

|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|

| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0

On Apr 25, 2012, at 9:59 AM, Charles Hostetler wrote:

--- In STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...>, Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...> wrote:
I have used a very thin wash of light grey as a base for weathering light colored cars.
Use a variety of the light greys available to get contrasting shades. I mix this at 5%
paint & 95% thinner. Once satisfied with the look, I go back with grey chalks to
highlight the sides and hardware
...
Or, do it 1/2 yellow & 1/2 orange to show the results to the
base colors. Then blend in the chalks to highlight.
...
Final note, use the finest setting on your
air brush to keep from over flowing the wash on the car sides.


Fred,

Thank you for the ideas. I will give them a try today as I continue to experiment with a WFEX reefer. I hadn't tumbled to the idea that the chalks can highlight as well as darken...

Regards,

Charles Hostetler



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Two large flat car loads (UNCLASSIFIED)

midrly <midrly@...>
 

GSC also had a well-hole flatcar frame casting. See Trains Shed Cyclopedia #17 for drawings, and photos of these built up for the D&H and NYC. This issue of the TSC also has drawings and photos of some of the other GSC cast steel flat car frames.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Gatwood, Elden SAW" <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Guys;

GSC had several designs, almost "catalog" designs you could buy, built up, or carbody only. I have seen depressed center or solid deck flats in 100-t, 120-t, 150-t, 200-t, and 250-t, that have either the jacking pads like these, or block-design with a triangular hole in the center, and a variety of decking, including holes and keyholes for tie-downs.

Elden Gatwood


-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of rwitt_2000
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2012 10:59 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Two large flat car loads



Ron,

I checked the B&O diagram and the "Built By" information includes both
the "B&O RR DuBois" and the" General Steel Casting Co." So yes, as you
observed the car body was cast. This B&O flat car was completed in 1953
at their DuBois, Pa. car shops with the "body" coming from General Steel
Casting Co.

I can't recall if anyone on the list as order or lot information for
General Steel Casting Company to determine if this design was used by
other railroads.

Regards,

Bob Witt

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "mopacfirst" <ron.merrick@> wrote:

This car looks very similar to a MoPac car I know - perhaps they were
built to the same plan since this is a cast body.

Ron Merrick


--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "rwitt_2000" rwitt_2000@ wrote:

Bill,

Thanks for sharing these photos.

The B&O 9050 was a class P-28 built in 1953 and rated at 250tons.
Photos
of B&O depressed center flat car are rare as they represented a very
small fleet of cars on the B&ORR.

Regards,

Bob Witt

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "lnbill" <fgexbill@> wrote:

Here are links to two photos of very large flat car loads on the
Chicago Tribune's photo archive site==Bill Welch

http://store.tribunephotos.com/Items/aaa-181-ct?&caSKU=aaa-181-ct&caTitl\;
&#92;
<http://store.tribunephotos.com/Items/aaa-181-ct?&caSKU=aaa-181-ct&caTitl> > > e=Railroad%20Freight%20Car%201954%20-%20Chicago%20Tribune

http://store.tribunephotos.com/Items/ans-028-ct?&caSKU=ans-028-ct&caTitl\;
&#92;
<http://store.tribunephotos.com/Items/ans-028-ct?&caSKU=ans-028-ct&caTitl> > > e=Flat%20Railroad%20Car%201951




Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Re: Weathering Lighter Colored Cars

Jim Betz
 

Charles,

My approach is to thin out the washes - as in at least 2 and
often 3 times as much water to color ratio. You can always go
back and do a second wash if there isn't enough. *G*

These same extra thin washes can also be used on darker colored
equipment to produce "light weathering".

I usually test the effect of all washes - by applying to the
underside of a car first ... it is just a bit scary how much
difference there can be based upon the ratio of paint (acrylics
usually) and the thinner ... and the color of whatever it is that
you are weathering.
- Jim


Re: Weathering Lighter Colored Cars

Armand Premo
 

Has anyone painted the interior of light colored house cars a dark color ? Armand Premo----- Original Message -----
From: Charles Hostetler
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, April 25, 2012 10:59 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Weathering Lighter Colored Cars



--- In STMFC@..., Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...> wrote:
> I have used a very thin wash of light grey as a base for weathering light colored cars.
> Use a variety of the light greys available to get contrasting shades. I mix this at 5%
> paint & 95% thinner. Once satisfied with the look, I go back with grey chalks to
> highlight the sides and hardware
...
> Or, do it 1/2 yellow & 1/2 orange to show the results to the
> base colors. Then blend in the chalks to highlight.
...
>Final note, use the finest setting on your
> air brush to keep from over flowing the wash on the car sides.

Fred,

Thank you for the ideas. I will give them a try today as I continue to experiment with a WFEX reefer. I hadn't tumbled to the idea that the chalks can highlight as well as darken...

Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Re: Weathering Lighter Colored Cars

Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...> wrote:
I have used a very thin wash of light grey as a base for weathering light colored cars.
Use a variety of the light greys available to get contrasting shades. I mix this at 5%
paint & 95% thinner. Once satisfied with the look, I go back with grey chalks to
highlight the sides and hardware
...
Or, do it 1/2 yellow & 1/2 orange to show the results to the
base colors. Then blend in the chalks to highlight.
...
Final note, use the finest setting on your
air brush to keep from over flowing the wash on the car sides.

Fred,

Thank you for the ideas. I will give them a try today as I continue to experiment with a WFEX reefer. I hadn't tumbled to the idea that the chalks can highlight as well as darken...

Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Re: Weathering Lighter Colored Cars

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Charles,
 
I have used a very thin wash of light grey as a base for weathering light colored cars.
Use a variety of the light greys available to get contrasting shades. I mix this at 5%
paint & 95% thinner. Once satisfied with the look, I go back with grey chalks to
highlight the sides and hardware.
To get the hang of it, use a spare square of evergreen styrene to practice on painted
the color of the side. Or, do it 1/2 yellow & 1/2 orange to show the results to the
base colors. Then blend in the chalks to highlight. Best to work from photos to get
proper results. By all means keep the practice square; there are other ideas you can
work into this type of application. ie: the black muck that appears at the bottom of
the doors, rust on the hardware, wheels splash on the ends, and discoloration of the
truck sideframes from the salt water run off.
There is always the black ink and alcohol trick to add grime to places it would
collect. To experiment with this; glue random pieces of plastic to your test square,
add odd bits of wire grabs[ does not need to be perfect pieces]. This will work
better on steel sided cars as the lap joints in the sides will collect the grime.
give it a try and see how you do with it. Final note, use the finest setting on your
air brush to keep from over flowing the wash on the car sides.
 
Fred Freitas


________________________________
From: Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2012 9:40 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Weathering Lighter Colored Cars


 
Good Evening,

My first three weathering tries were on basic black hoppers. I just finished weathering a PCCX hopper in the yellow scheme, hoping to get some experience with a lighter colored car before I tackle my Shake N Take Hormel reefers:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2012/04/pccx-6401-6425-usra-twin-hopper.html

I think I found out that a lighter colored acrylic wash is necessary for application to a lighter colored car. The darker wash ended up looking "muddy" (and I don't mean that in a good way) before I scrubbed it off and lightened it up a lot. Would some of you with more experience be willing to comment on this observation?

Regards,

Charles Hostetler
Goshen, IN


Mark Purvis

jerryglow2
 

If there's a Mark Purvis on this list or anyone knows contact info,
please contact me OFF LIST

--
Jerry Glow
The Villages FL
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/decals/


Weathering Lighter Colored Cars

Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
 

Good Evening,

My first three weathering tries were on basic black hoppers. I just finished weathering a PCCX hopper in the yellow scheme, hoping to get some experience with a lighter colored car before I tackle my Shake N Take Hormel reefers:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2012/04/pccx-6401-6425-usra-twin-hopper.html


I think I found out that a lighter colored acrylic wash is necessary for application to a lighter colored car. The darker wash ended up looking "muddy" (and I don't mean that in a good way) before I scrubbed it off and lightened it up a lot. Would some of you with more experience be willing to comment on this observation?

Regards,

Charles Hostetler
Goshen, IN


Re: Microscale Product

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

The product is Micro Scale Liquid Decal Film (MI-12).



Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
WILLIAM PARDIE
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2012 1:50 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Microsale Product





I recall that there was a Microscale product that touted as one of the uses
brushing
on old decals to solidify them and prevent shredding. Does anyone else
recall this
and was the product Krystle Kleer?

Thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie


Re: Microsale Product

Tim O'Connor
 

I use Krystal Klear for attaching etched roofwalks to box cars!

----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Ehni" <behni@...>

Krystle Kleer is their window filmŠ

Thanks!
--

Brian P. Ehni



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Microsale Product

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 24, 2012, at 11:50 AM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:

I recall that there was a Microscale product that touted as one of
the uses brushing
on old decals to solidify them and prevent shredding. Does anyone
else recall this
and was the product Krystle Kleer?
Bill, I had just finished using some when your e-mail arrived. It's
called Super Film.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Two large flat car loads (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Guys;

GSC had several designs, almost "catalog" designs you could buy, built up, or carbody only. I have seen depressed center or solid deck flats in 100-t, 120-t, 150-t, 200-t, and 250-t, that have either the jacking pads like these, or block-design with a triangular hole in the center, and a variety of decking, including holes and keyholes for tie-downs.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of rwitt_2000
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2012 10:59 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Two large flat car loads



Ron,

I checked the B&O diagram and the "Built By" information includes both
the "B&O RR DuBois" and the" General Steel Casting Co." So yes, as you
observed the car body was cast. This B&O flat car was completed in 1953
at their DuBois, Pa. car shops with the "body" coming from General Steel
Casting Co.

I can't recall if anyone on the list as order or lot information for
General Steel Casting Company to determine if this design was used by
other railroads.

Regards,

Bob Witt

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "mopacfirst" <ron.merrick@...> wrote:

This car looks very similar to a MoPac car I know - perhaps they were
built to the same plan since this is a cast body.

Ron Merrick


--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "rwitt_2000" rwitt_2000@ wrote:

Bill,

Thanks for sharing these photos.

The B&O 9050 was a class P-28 built in 1953 and rated at 250tons.
Photos
of B&O depressed center flat car are rare as they represented a very
small fleet of cars on the B&ORR.

Regards,

Bob Witt

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "lnbill" <fgexbill@> wrote:

Here are links to two photos of very large flat car loads on the
Chicago Tribune's photo archive site==Bill Welch

http://store.tribunephotos.com/Items/aaa-181-ct?&caSKU=aaa-181-ct&caTitl\;
&#92;
<http://store.tribunephotos.com/Items/aaa-181-ct?&caSKU=aaa-181-ct&caTitl> > > e=Railroad%20Freight%20Car%201954%20-%20Chicago%20Tribune

http://store.tribunephotos.com/Items/ans-028-ct?&caSKU=ans-028-ct&caTitl\;
&#92;
<http://store.tribunephotos.com/Items/ans-028-ct?&caSKU=ans-028-ct&caTitl> > > e=Flat%20Railroad%20Car%201951




Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Re: Microsale Product

Brian Ehni <behni@...>
 

Krystle Kleer is their window filmŠ


Thanks!
--

Brian P. Ehni

From: WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Date: Tuesday, April 24, 2012 1:50 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Microsale Product






I recall that there was a Microscale product that touted as one of the uses
brushing
on old decals to solidify them and prevent shredding. Does anyone else
recall this
and was the product Krystle Kleer?

Thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Microsale Product

Brian Ehni <behni@...>
 

MI-12 Liquid Decal Film


Thanks!
--

Brian P. Ehni

From: WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Date: Tuesday, April 24, 2012 1:50 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Microsale Product






I recall that there was a Microscale product that touted as one of the uses
brushing
on old decals to solidify them and prevent shredding. Does anyone else
recall this
and was the product Krystle Kleer?

Thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Microsale Product

Bruce Smith
 

No. It is Micro Liquid Decal Film -- Stock# MI-12

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

__

/ &#92;

__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________

|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |

| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||

|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|

| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0

On Apr 24, 2012, at 1:50 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:

I recall that there was a Microscale product that touted as one of the uses brushing
on old decals to solidify them and prevent shredding. Does anyone else recall this
and was the product Krystle Kleer?

Thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie








------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Microsale Product

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I recall that there was a Microscale product that touted as one of the uses brushing
on old decals to solidify them and prevent shredding. Does anyone else recall this
and was the product Krystle Kleer?

Thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie


Re: Two large flat car loads

rwitt_2000
 

Ron,

I checked the B&O diagram and the "Built By" information includes both
the "B&O RR DuBois" and the" General Steel Casting Co." So yes, as you
observed the car body was cast. This B&O flat car was completed in 1953
at their DuBois, Pa. car shops with the "body" coming from General Steel
Casting Co.

I can't recall if anyone on the list as order or lot information for
General Steel Casting Company to determine if this design was used by
other railroads.

Regards,

Bob Witt


--- In STMFC@..., "mopacfirst" <ron.merrick@...> wrote:

This car looks very similar to a MoPac car I know - perhaps they were
built to the same plan since this is a cast body.

Ron Merrick


--- In STMFC@..., "rwitt_2000" rwitt_2000@ wrote:

Bill,

Thanks for sharing these photos.

The B&O 9050 was a class P-28 built in 1953 and rated at 250tons.
Photos
of B&O depressed center flat car are rare as they represented a very
small fleet of cars on the B&ORR.

Regards,

Bob Witt

--- In STMFC@..., "lnbill" <fgexbill@> wrote:

Here are links to two photos of very large flat car loads on the
Chicago Tribune's photo archive site==Bill Welch

http://store.tribunephotos.com/Items/aaa-181-ct?&caSKU=aaa-181-ct&caTitl\;
&#92;
e=Railroad%20Freight%20Car%201954%20-%20Chicago%20Tribune

http://store.tribunephotos.com/Items/ans-028-ct?&caSKU=ans-028-ct&caTitl\;
&#92;
e=Flat%20Railroad%20Car%201951


Re: Two large flat car loads

mopacfirst
 

This car looks very similar to a MoPac car I know - perhaps they were built to the same plan since this is a cast body.

Ron Merrick

--- In STMFC@..., "rwitt_2000" <rwitt_2000@...> wrote:

Bill,

Thanks for sharing these photos.

The B&O 9050 was a class P-28 built in 1953 and rated at 250tons. Photos
of B&O depressed center flat car are rare as they represented a very
small fleet of cars on the B&ORR.

Regards,

Bob Witt

--- In STMFC@..., "lnbill" <fgexbill@> wrote:

Here are links to two photos of very large flat car loads on the
Chicago Tribune's photo archive site==Bill Welch

http://store.tribunephotos.com/Items/aaa-181-ct?&caSKU=aaa-181-ct&caTitl\;
e=Railroad%20Freight%20Car%201954%20-%20Chicago%20Tribune

http://store.tribunephotos.com/Items/ans-028-ct?&caSKU=ans-028-ct&caTitl\;
e=Flat%20Railroad%20Car%201951


waybilling cuts of cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

The interesting question of paperwork for empty cars which are interchangeable (such as empty hoppers to a mine, empty log cars returning for reload, etc.) has intrigued me for some time. Ted Pamperin's nice article in the February _Model Railroader_ inspired me to dig deeper, because log traffic of the kind just mentioned does indeed take place on Otis McGee's layout. I have now made up some routing slips for tryout, and have described the forms and their use on a new post to my blog. If you're interested, here is a link.

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2012/04/waybills-23-handling-cuts-of-cars.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history