Date   

Re: TNO box car question

gn999gn
 

Clark -

Even though the Speedwitch website does not list this mini-kit
for your application, it is definitely available and in stock.
Drop Speedwitch an email and request it.
It has all the material you need to create this car including the
correct Southwest Scale Productions doors.
Not sure if the running board and handbrake are part of this package.

Ron dePierre

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Clark,

The main problem with ALL Intermountain 12-panel models is the
Youngstown doors, which are prewar doors for their 10-panel 1937
AAR box car kit. The correct doors can be purchased from Dan Hall
(Southwest Scale Productions). So make sure you buy a kit and not
RTR, unless you like trying to match paint colors! :-)

The door you want is Dan Hall #614

For decals Speedwitch D110 is the B-50-25 (and other SP 10') and
D114 is for the 1937 AAR cars (almost identical but more correct
for your 1954 era, since D110 gives you the post-1955 lettering)

Your car, T&NO 57138, had Equipco handbrakes, Gypsum running board,
ASF A-3 trucks, and Youngstown doors. This is how series 56951-57199
were equipped. Don't forget the 8-rung ladders!

Note sure why you couldn't find it in the 1959 ORER -- my copy lists
T&NO 54850-57199 (2,308 cars).

Tim O'Connor

-----------------------------------------------------------------

> Thanks Guys. The renumbering is why my 59 ORER numbers didn't match.
> I didn't see the kit on Ted's website, so I'll start looking for an IM car....
> good luck to me.... Clark Propst


Re: TNO box car question

Tim O'Connor
 

Clark,

The main problem with ALL Intermountain 12-panel models is the
Youngstown doors, which are prewar doors for their 10-panel 1937
AAR box car kit. The correct doors can be purchased from Dan Hall
(Southwest Scale Productions). So make sure you buy a kit and not
RTR, unless you like trying to match paint colors! :-)

The door you want is Dan Hall #614

For decals Speedwitch D110 is the B-50-25 (and other SP 10') and
D114 is for the 1937 AAR cars (almost identical but more correct
for your 1954 era, since D110 gives you the post-1955 lettering)

Your car, T&NO 57138, had Equipco handbrakes, Gypsum running board,
ASF A-3 trucks, and Youngstown doors. This is how series 56951-57199
were equipped. Don't forget the 8-rung ladders!

Note sure why you couldn't find it in the 1959 ORER -- my copy lists
T&NO 54850-57199 (2,308 cars).

Tim O'Connor

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks Guys. The renumbering is why my 59 ORER numbers didn't match.
> I didn't see the kit on Ted's website, so I'll start looking for an IM car....
> good luck to me.... Clark Propst


Re: Decal water wet?

North Model Railroad Supplies <nmrs@...>
 

Like Jim said, I warm the distilled water and find the backing paper just
falls off the decals.

I've suffered through Denny's problem of losing the decal in the depths of
the bowl I used to use as well.

I recently tried a new decal tray from Trumpeter (Chinese model kit
manufacturer).

It consists of a solid bottom tray and a perforated strainer tray that fits
into the bottom tray.

The strainer tray sits at two levels - with the perforated base either
immersed or raised and therefore out of the water.

You fit the two trays together with the strainer tray on the bottom level.

Then fill with water until the base of the strainer tray is a few mm under
water.

You then drop the decal in and leave it the normal amount of time.

Once the time is up, you slide the inner tray up small ramps set into the
side of the bottom tray that then level out onto the upper shelf.

So you now have the dampened decal sitting on the plastic grill, out of the
water.



They also provide a comb-like tool for sliding under the decal to lift it
out of the tray.



I'm using decal paper from Tango Papa which is much finer than any of the
commercial papers and this tray has been a revelation.

I guess you could paint half of it black so you can see white decals, but
because the whole tray lifts clear of the water with the decal sitting on
it, finding decals hasn't been an issue.



Our hobby business sources them from Hobbytyme Distributors in CT, but we
are in Australia so I'm not sure which hobby shops in the US would carry
them.

They list for US$7.00 and are worth every penny IMHO.

Here are some pics

Both trays separated and tool

<http://tinyurl.com/73queam> http://tinyurl.com/73queam

Both tray together

<http://tinyurl.com/8xmgw9p> http://tinyurl.com/8xmgw9p

These Tiny URLs will take you to Trumpeter's Chinese website so you can't
see any text, but the pics are pretty much self explanatory.

The stock number is 9918



Regards,

David North

North Model Railroad Supplies Pty. Ltd.

<http://www.northmodelrailroadsupplies.com>
www.northmodelrailroadsupplies.com


Re: Fox Valley (and ExactRail) B&O Wagontop

Todd Horton
 

Thanks for the info Bob !!   Todd



________________________________
From: rwitt_2000 <rwitt_2000@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2011 9:59 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Fox Valley (and ExactRail) B&O Wagontop



 

Todd,

This was discussed in some earlier posts. Briefly, the photo evidence
indicates that most cars appear to have Youngstown doors after ~1955,
but there is a photo from 1952 of an M-53 already with a Youngstown
door. No memos have appeared in the B&O archives describing a planned
door replacement program for the M-53.

Trying not to confused the facts, but it appears from photo evidence
that the when the M-15 wagon-tops received new AAR underframes in ~1955
they also received new Youngstown doors. A speculative suggestion would
be that the use of replacements doors on the M-15 wagon-tops led to a
door replacement program for the class M-53.

The circle "T" indicates that the box car is suitable for l.c.l.
(less-than-car load) service, which was named "Time-Saver Service" on
the B&O. That usually indicated that the box car was suitable for class
A loads.

Bob Witt

Todd Horton wrote:

Does anyone know if (all of the cars had)Â and when the doors would
have been replaced? The Springs Mills site shows in service pics of cars
with Youngstown doors on all of them. One other minor detail, what's the
"circle T" designate? Todd Horton



________________________________
From: rwitt_2000 rwitt_2000@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2011 8:27 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Fox Valley (and ExactRail) B&O Wagontop



Â

Andrew,

I just checked the Spring Mills Depot web site and they don't imply
their special run from Fox Valley is sold out. You can check with
them.

http://www.springmillsdepot.com/M53_status.htm

Also there is another run from Fox Valley due first quarter next year.
The B&OHS will have a special run of unique numbers so keep checking
that site as more details become available. http://borhs.org/

For an Exactrail, I would try to get a kit as I believe the door is a
separate part.

Regards,

Bob Witt

Andrew wrote:

Hi,

Like John Degnan, I model 1957. I have seen photos of my
modeling area (eastern Ontario) that indicate B&O M-53
boxcars were an occasional visitor--though not as common
as B&O open hoppers with soft coal for industrial customers.

Photos I've seen of M-53 boxcars in my area and time period
all have the Youngstown doors, not the Tatum doors.

I missed out on the Fox Valley run of M-53s earlier this year
but am interested in possibly getting one of the ExactRail
models. I notice ExactRail isn't offering a version with the
Youngstown doors.

Any guesses on the likelihood of ExactRail doing a future
run of these cars with Youngstown doors and later period
lettering schemes? Alternately, what would be a good
aftermarket Youngstown door to retrofit onto one of the
upcoming run of ExactRail models?

Regards,
Andrew

--- In STMFC@..., "rwitt_2000" rwitt_2000@ wrote:

Tim,

I forgot to add that I observed a M-53, ~1960, in a long line of
bad
ordered B&O box cars in Caseyville, Illinois. It still had Tatum
doors
one, which was off its tracks was lying on the floor of the car. I
believe it was the first time I saw a XLT door. As you suggest, it
is
possible that some M-53s made it to the late 1950s still with
their
Tatum doors.

Regards,

Bob Witt

Tim O'Connor wrote:


Thanks Bob. Since my modeling -begins- with 1955 I'll be waiting
for
the cars with replacement doors... but maybe an XLT will slip in
there.


I have 6 photos and/or Xeroxes of photos of M-53 and 1 M-53A
all
still
with their Tatum "XLT" doors. Most are from the Anderson,
Barkan
and
King Collection. The re-weigh dates range from 12-45 to 3-55.
The
paint
schemes range from the early "13 Great States" to the late "13
Great
States" as described in the Barkan document. The re-weigh dates
from
the
1950s include 1950, 1951, 1952 (2), and 1953.

The last is a shop photo at Mt. Clare of a M-53 wearing the
brand
new
"Billboard scheme". It was common for the B&O to do samples at
their
"mother shop", Mt. Clare in Baltimore, before changes were
released
system wide.

Based upon photos its appears the doors were replaced beginning
in
the
mid-1950s.

Bob Witt







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Decal water wet?

Clark Propst
 

I've learned a different technique over the years that works for me. I do have problems with water's surface tension. I cut out the decal, stick it with my knife tip, dip it in the water then set it on the model. I find it absorbs water quicker with I stick it in upside down and watch the backing paper wet. I'll place all the decals on the side of a model - then slide them off the paper. I have had problems waiting for older Champ decals to 'loosen' too. The trick is waiting...I usually decal the side of a model in just a few minutes. Don't know why I'm always in a hurry? The model is going to be around for a long time...
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


T&NO Freight Stations

Al Campbell
 

Hello: I recently aquired a T&NO freight conductors wheel report from 1943. I'm trying to get a sense of locations. The "from" and "arrived" spaces on the entries are numbers such as 232 to 286 or 232 to 121 or 337 to 231. Would anyone know if these are milemarkers or coded freight yards? Is there a map or a station and sidings listing available? Once I get a better idea of what I'm seeing in this book I'd be pleased to share this info with the group. Thanks for any help, Al Campbell


Re: 1890's ORER

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Thanks to Al Westerfield, Adrian and several others who replied on and off
list. I think I have the information I need for now. It is wonderful to
have such resources.



Thanks again,

Steve Hile



_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
dnaldimodaroloc
Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2011 10:42 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: 1890's ORER





Steve, I have have 1892 and 1899 on disc and my dad has Jan 96 and something
from both 97 and 98 in the original format. What do you need to know?

Best,
Adrian Hundhausen

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Steve and
Barb Hile" <shile@...> wrote:

I am looking for the Rock Island pages from a mid 1890's ORER. Does anyone
have a copy that they could share?



Thanks in advance.



Steve Hile





Re: Decal water wet?

Steve SANDIFER
 

I picked up a shallow dark brown plastic tray at a junk sale, the kind of tray that the waiter used to use to deliver your bill. It is about 4x6" and less than 1/2" deep with sloped sides and works great
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: Schuyler Larrabee
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2011 9:54 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Decal water wet?



Or a dark blue lid. The flexible "covers" for Maxwell House coffee are
good. The sides are about ¼" high.

Schuyler

Denny,

I have used a black plastic watermark detector tray (from my stamp
collecting supplies) for use with white and other light color decals in
removing the backing. They are inexpensive ($2-$3) and pretty much
unbreakable if dropped (unlike glass containers). Even the smallest decal
shows up if it floats off the paper, even if it settles to the bottom. (Of
course, if one finds a black plastic lid, it will have the same results for
free).

Ken Montero

Denny,

I, too, have had similar experience with older Champ decals. I have just
left them to absorb water through the backing paper until it falls way.
Sometimes this may take as much as forty five minutes.

Chasing the tiny white lettering on the decal film is made easier if you use
a glass ashtray painted BLACK on the outside as your vessel to soak in.

J. Greedy

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ,
dennyanspach <danspach@...> wrote:
>
> A lot of interesting and critical replies:
>
> My question arose from a recent experience with some relatively ancient,
but otherwise still very fine Champ decals whose decal paper simply would
not "wet" in any kind of timely fashion, forcing me to eventually "push" the
decal off- hazarding the decal in the process (the paper was still almost
dry underneath the film). Also, increasingly, I am placing my decal water in
very shallow jar lids, etc. with the water only about 1/8"-3/16" deep. In
this circumstance, of course the effects of surface tension are closer at
hand. I use the shallow pan/dish so that tiny decals do not sink out of
sight when I am futilely chasing them around the surface (surface tension
effect), and there is much less water through which I must futilely fish
around to at last find the little @#$%^&* (if I find it at all) when they
sink.
>
> I have always used tap water and never, ever had residue problems, but
using distilled water would also also seem a no-brainer (is there an
expected difference in surface tension between distilled water -no
minerals-, and tap water -varying amounts and kinds of minerals?.
>
> I like the PhotoFlo idea. I would expect one bottle to last both me, my
children, and my grandchildren at the rate I would use it, however.
>
> Denny
>
> Denny S. Anspach MD
> Sacramento
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>



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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Decal water wet?

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Or a dark blue lid. The flexible “covers” for Maxwell House coffee are
good. The sides are about ¼” high.



Schuyler



Denny,

I have used a black plastic watermark detector tray (from my stamp
collecting supplies) for use with white and other light color decals in
removing the backing. They are inexpensive ($2-$3) and pretty much
unbreakable if dropped (unlike glass containers). Even the smallest decal
shows up if it floats off the paper, even if it settles to the bottom. (Of
course, if one finds a black plastic lid, it will have the same results for
free).

Ken Montero

Denny,

I, too, have had similar experience with older Champ decals. I have just
left them to absorb water through the backing paper until it falls way.
Sometimes this may take as much as forty five minutes.

Chasing the tiny white lettering on the decal film is made easier if you use
a glass ashtray painted BLACK on the outside as your vessel to soak in.

J. Greedy

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ,
dennyanspach <danspach@...> wrote:

A lot of interesting and critical replies:

My question arose from a recent experience with some relatively ancient,
but otherwise still very fine Champ decals whose decal paper simply would
not "wet" in any kind of timely fashion, forcing me to eventually "push" the
decal off- hazarding the decal in the process (the paper was still almost
dry underneath the film). Also, increasingly, I am placing my decal water in
very shallow jar lids, etc. with the water only about 1/8"-3/16" deep. In
this circumstance, of course the effects of surface tension are closer at
hand. I use the shallow pan/dish so that tiny decals do not sink out of
sight when I am futilely chasing them around the surface (surface tension
effect), and there is much less water through which I must futilely fish
around to at last find the little @#$%^&* (if I find it at all) when they
sink.

I have always used tap water and never, ever had residue problems, but
using distilled water would also also seem a no-brainer (is there an
expected difference in surface tension between distilled water -no
minerals-, and tap water -varying amounts and kinds of minerals?.

I like the PhotoFlo idea. I would expect one bottle to last both me, my
children, and my grandchildren at the rate I would use it, however.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








=======
Email scanned by PC Tools - No viruses or spyware found.
(Email Guard: 7.0.0.21, Virus/Spyware Database: 6.18780)
http://www.pctools.com <http://www.pctools.com/?cclick=EmailFooterClean_51>
=======





=======
Email scanned by PC Tools - No viruses or spyware found.
(Email Guard: 7.0.0.21, Virus/Spyware Database: 6.18780)
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Re: Decal water wet?

PennsyNut <pennsynut@...>
 

On 27,11 2011 21:25 PM, va661midlo@... wrote:

Morgan,
The only drawback to the frozen entree tray that I can envision is
that a very small decal is harder to find in a larger tray than in a
smaller tray if you don't keep an eye on it at all times. Sometimes, a
very small decal can be hard to find even in a small tray if it has
floated off its paper.
Ken Montero
OK, Ken
I am a 73 yr old pack rat. I save everything. How about a "screw cap"
from medicine or vitamins? I have one that's 1" in diam. Also, some that
are a little larger, about 1.25" and some 1.5". All I'm suggesting is
for almost any model railroader can find something around the house or
wherever that can be recycled into something useful. Straws make
excellent pipes. I could go on, but you get the idea. Another thought
that just hit me is to take a black tray from a frozen meal that is
compartment-ed. But cut off what you don't need, the larger and other
compartment. Leaving just the one small one. That is an odd shape, but
about 3" or so? But I also remember trying to use a decal that was 3"
long that would never work in a bottle cap. It would require the food tray.
I understand completely when you are using one little letter decal. In
HO, I can't hardly see it, and in N, it would be impossible to see.
Model railroading is fun!
FYI on wet water. Dish detergent is wonderful for gardening. But watch
out what brand you use, it contains chemicals and such that will make
your "water" bad for the decal. Amway LOC is good, Dawn is OK. Maybe
"Ivory". Distilled water is about the best. It's what I use.
Morgan Bilbo


Re: Decal water wet?

Kenneth Montero
 

Morgan,

The only drawback to the frozen entree tray that I can envision is that a very small decal is harder to find in a larger tray than in a smaller tray if you don't keep an eye on it at all times. Sometimes, a very small decal can be hard to find even in a small tray if it has floated off its paper.

Ken Montero

----- Original Message -----
From: "PennsyNut" <pennsynut@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2011 10:12:31 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Decal water wet?






On 27,11 2011 20:43 PM, va661midlo@... wrote:

Denny,
I have used a black plastic watermark detector tray (from my stamp
collecting supplies) for use with white and other light color decals
in removing the backing. They are inexpensive ($2-$3) and pretty much
unbreakable if dropped (unlike glass containers). Even the smallest
decal shows up if it floats off the paper, even if it settles to the
bottom. (Of course, if one finds a black plastic lid, it will have the
same results for free).
Ken Montero
To all
What's wrong with using the black trays that come with frozen entrees?
They cost nothing (Assuming you eat what you bought. LOL). Unbreakable.
Replaceable. Come in many sizes, square, rectangular, round, 4" x 6" and
larger. I have dozens around the house for all sorts of things. Pencil
tray. Keep things neat in a drawer. Use your imagination.
Morgan Bilbo Ferroequinologist SPF PRRTHS #1204

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


LS&I Ore cars

Dave Nelson
 

A friend asked about the LS&I 9500 series of ore cars. I guessed they were
not from the steam era. another person thought they were and had been
renumbered for some reason. A check of an early 70's ORER showed nothing.



Does anyone here know if this series of cars was from the steam era and if
so, what were their original car numbers?



TIA.



Dave Nelson


Re: Decal water wet?

PennsyNut <pennsynut@...>
 

On 27,11 2011 20:43 PM, va661midlo@... wrote:

Denny,
I have used a black plastic watermark detector tray (from my stamp
collecting supplies) for use with white and other light color decals
in removing the backing. They are inexpensive ($2-$3) and pretty much
unbreakable if dropped (unlike glass containers). Even the smallest
decal shows up if it floats off the paper, even if it settles to the
bottom. (Of course, if one finds a black plastic lid, it will have the
same results for free).
Ken Montero
To all
What's wrong with using the black trays that come with frozen entrees?
They cost nothing (Assuming you eat what you bought. LOL). Unbreakable.
Replaceable. Come in many sizes, square, rectangular, round, 4" x 6" and
larger. I have dozens around the house for all sorts of things. Pencil
tray. Keep things neat in a drawer. Use your imagination.
Morgan Bilbo Ferroequinologist SPF PRRTHS #1204


Re: Fox Valley (and ExactRail) B&O Wagontop

rwitt_2000
 

Todd,

This was discussed in some earlier posts. Briefly, the photo evidence
indicates that most cars appear to have Youngstown doors after ~1955,
but there is a photo from 1952 of an M-53 already with a Youngstown
door. No memos have appeared in the B&O archives describing a planned
door replacement program for the M-53.

Trying not to confused the facts, but it appears from photo evidence
that the when the M-15 wagon-tops received new AAR underframes in ~1955
they also received new Youngstown doors. A speculative suggestion would
be that the use of replacements doors on the M-15 wagon-tops led to a
door replacement program for the class M-53.

The circle "T" indicates that the box car is suitable for l.c.l.
(less-than-car load) service, which was named "Time-Saver Service" on
the B&O. That usually indicated that the box car was suitable for class
A loads.

Bob Witt


Todd Horton wrote:

Does anyone know if (all of the cars had)Â and when the doors would
have been replaced? The Springs Mills site shows in service pics of cars
with Youngstown doors on all of them. One other minor detail, what's the
"circle T" designate? Todd Horton



________________________________
From: rwitt_2000 rwitt_2000@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2011 8:27 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Fox Valley (and ExactRail) B&O Wagontop



Â

Andrew,

I just checked the Spring Mills Depot web site and they don't imply
their special run from Fox Valley is sold out. You can check with
them.

http://www.springmillsdepot.com/M53_status.htm

Also there is another run from Fox Valley due first quarter next year.
The B&OHS will have a special run of unique numbers so keep checking
that site as more details become available. http://borhs.org/

For an Exactrail, I would try to get a kit as I believe the door is a
separate part.

Regards,

Bob Witt

Andrew wrote:

Hi,

Like John Degnan, I model 1957. I have seen photos of my
modeling area (eastern Ontario) that indicate B&O M-53
boxcars were an occasional visitor--though not as common
as B&O open hoppers with soft coal for industrial customers.

Photos I've seen of M-53 boxcars in my area and time period
all have the Youngstown doors, not the Tatum doors.

I missed out on the Fox Valley run of M-53s earlier this year
but am interested in possibly getting one of the ExactRail
models. I notice ExactRail isn't offering a version with the
Youngstown doors.

Any guesses on the likelihood of ExactRail doing a future
run of these cars with Youngstown doors and later period
lettering schemes? Alternately, what would be a good
aftermarket Youngstown door to retrofit onto one of the
upcoming run of ExactRail models?

Regards,
Andrew

--- In STMFC@..., "rwitt_2000" rwitt_2000@ wrote:

Tim,

I forgot to add that I observed a M-53, ~1960, in a long line of
bad
ordered B&O box cars in Caseyville, Illinois. It still had Tatum
doors
one, which was off its tracks was lying on the floor of the car. I
believe it was the first time I saw a XLT door. As you suggest, it
is
possible that some M-53s made it to the late 1950s still with
their
Tatum doors.

Regards,

Bob Witt

Tim O'Connor wrote:


Thanks Bob. Since my modeling -begins- with 1955 I'll be waiting
for
the cars with replacement doors... but maybe an XLT will slip in
there.


I have 6 photos and/or Xeroxes of photos of M-53 and 1 M-53A
all
still
with their Tatum "XLT" doors. Most are from the Anderson,
Barkan
and
King Collection. The re-weigh dates range from 12-45 to 3-55.
The
paint
schemes range from the early "13 Great States" to the late "13
Great
States" as described in the Barkan document. The re-weigh dates
from
the
1950s include 1950, 1951, 1952 (2), and 1953.

The last is a shop photo at Mt. Clare of a M-53 wearing the
brand
new
"Billboard scheme". It was common for the B&O to do samples at
their
"mother shop", Mt. Clare in Baltimore, before changes were
released
system wide.

Based upon photos its appears the doors were replaced beginning
in
the
mid-1950s.

Bob Witt



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Decal water wet?

John H <sprinthag@...>
 

I purchased my bottle of Photo Flo at least twenty years ago (probably more and quite possbilly many more) for use in the then new water based paints. I was conserned about the cost until I went to a photo shop and inquired. The bottle was like three bucks, cheap enough even back then.

I didn't find it to be all that big improvement for painting so I tried it on decals. I did do several trials with painting a a fedw with decaling and still have still have a third of the bottle remaining. So give it a try. It just may work with your method of application. It should definitely help those old Champ decal paper absorb water but then, so should a drop of dish detergent.

John Hagen

--- In STMFC@..., dennyanspach <danspach@...> wrote:

A lot of interesting and critical replies:

My question arose from a recent experience with some relatively ancient, but otherwise still very fine Champ decals whose decal paper simply would not "wet" in any kind of timely fashion, forcing me to eventually "push" the decal off- hazarding the decal in the process (the paper was still almost dry underneath the film). Also, increasingly, I am placing my decal water in very shallow jar lids, etc. with the water only about 1/8"-3/16" deep. In this circumstance, of course the effects of surface tension are closer at hand. I use the shallow pan/dish so that tiny decals do not sink out of sight when I am futilely chasing them around the surface (surface tension effect), and there is much less water through which I must futilely fish around to at last find the little @#$%^&* (if I find it at all) when they sink.

I have always used tap water and never, ever had residue problems, but using distilled water would also also seem a no-brainer (is there an expected difference in surface tension between distilled water -no minerals-, and tap water -varying amounts and kinds of minerals?.

I like the PhotoFlo idea. I would expect one bottle to last both me, my children, and my grandchildren at the rate I would use it, however.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Decal water wet?

Kenneth Montero
 

Denny,

I have used a black plastic watermark detector tray (from my stamp collecting supplies) for use with white and other light color decals in removing the backing. They are inexpensive ($2-$3) and pretty much unbreakable if dropped (unlike glass containers). Even the smallest decal shows up if it floats off the paper, even if it settles to the bottom. (Of course, if one finds a black plastic lid, it will have the same results for free).

Ken Montero

----- Original Message -----
From: "sctry" <JGreedy@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2011 8:51:03 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Decal water wet?






Denny,

I, too, have had similar experience with older Champ decals. I have just left them to absorb water through the backing paper until it falls way. Some times this may take as much as forty five minutes.

Chasing the tiny white lettering on the decal film is made easier if you use a glass ashtray paited BLACK on the outside as your vessel to soak in.

J. Greedy

--- In STMFC@... , dennyanspach <danspach@...> wrote:

A lot of interesting and critical replies:

My question arose from a recent experience with some relatively ancient, but otherwise still very fine Champ decals whose decal paper simply would not "wet" in any kind of timely fashion, forcing me to eventually "push" the decal off- hazarding the decal in the process (the paper was still almost dry underneath the film). Also, increasingly, I am placing my decal water in very shallow jar lids, etc. with the water only about 1/8"-3/16" deep. In this circumstance, of course the effects of surface tension are closer at hand. I use the shallow pan/dish so that tiny decals do not sink out of sight when I am futilely chasing them around the surface (surface tension effect), and there is much less water through which I must futilely fish around to at last find the little @#$%^&* (if I find it at all) when they sink.

I have always used tap water and never, ever had residue problems, but using distilled water would also also seem a no-brainer (is there an expected difference in surface tension between distilled water -no minerals-, and tap water -varying amounts and kinds of minerals?.

I like the PhotoFlo idea. I would expect one bottle to last both me, my children, and my grandchildren at the rate I would use it, however.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Boxcar and Covered Hopper Roof Removal

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Allen,
I have been running my cars with the stock weights from the same mfrs. I did add weight to a few resin Sunshine cars per NMRA standards, 3.5 oz for a 40' car as I remember. They felt much heavier to me. I have replaced the wheelsets with Intermountain semi scale and the standard size nickel plated on all but the few Atlas cars I have. Those have the stock wheelsets. My P2K cars have had wheelset replacements. I can run all day on the Mod-U-Trak layout both the older code 70 and the new layout with code 83. I have no trouble with derailments other than the few cars that have coupler height issues. The ones I'll fix by the next RPM show. My Oriental CB&Q USRA 0-8-0 can pull 60 cars with the replacements. So I wouldn't remove any hopper roofs.
Rob Manley
Midwest Mod-U-Trak
"Better modeling through personal embarrassment"

----- Original Message -----
From: Allen Cain
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2011 2:30 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Boxcar and Covered Hopper Roof Removal



I have been buying RTR boxcars and covered hoppers for the early 1950s time period from Red Caboose, Branchline, Intermountain and Atlas and would like to add weight to meet the NMRA standards. Would appreciate advice on how to remove the roofs to get to the inside to apply the correct weight.

Hopefully this question is okay on this list as I do model the time period covered.

Thanks,

Allen Cain


Re: Decal water wet?

james murrie
 

I've started putting my dish of tap water in the microwave for a minute or so before I toss in the decals. Using this "hot" water (more like hot shower temperature) cuts the time to float off the backing to seconds instead of minutes. In most cases I keep the decals secured in tweezers to make sure I don't have to immediately start chasing the decals around the water. New Microscale decals seem to slide off in seconds, older Champ ones only slightly longer.
FWIW
Jim Murrie


Re: Fox Valley (and ExactRail) B&O Wagontop

Todd Horton
 

Does anyone know if (all of the cars had) and when the doors would have been replaced? The Springs Mills site shows in service pics of cars with Youngstown doors on all of them. One other minor detail, what's the "circle T" designate? Todd Horton



________________________________
From: rwitt_2000 <rwitt_2000@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2011 8:27 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Fox Valley (and ExactRail) B&O Wagontop



 

Andrew,

I just checked the Spring Mills Depot web site and they don't imply
their special run from Fox Valley is sold out. You can check with them.

http://www.springmillsdepot.com/M53_status.htm

Also there is another run from Fox Valley due first quarter next year.
The B&OHS will have a special run of unique numbers so keep checking
that site as more details become available. http://borhs.org/

For an Exactrail, I would try to get a kit as I believe the door is a
separate part.

Regards,

Bob Witt

Andrew wrote:

Hi,

Like John Degnan, I model 1957. I have seen photos of my
modeling area (eastern Ontario) that indicate B&O M-53
boxcars were an occasional visitor--though not as common
as B&O open hoppers with soft coal for industrial customers.

Photos I've seen of M-53 boxcars in my area and time period
all have the Youngstown doors, not the Tatum doors.

I missed out on the Fox Valley run of M-53s earlier this year
but am interested in possibly getting one of the ExactRail
models. I notice ExactRail isn't offering a version with the
Youngstown doors.

Any guesses on the likelihood of ExactRail doing a future
run of these cars with Youngstown doors and later period
lettering schemes? Alternately, what would be a good
aftermarket Youngstown door to retrofit onto one of the
upcoming run of ExactRail models?

Regards,
Andrew

--- In STMFC@..., "rwitt_2000" rwitt_2000@ wrote:

Tim,

I forgot to add that I observed a M-53, ~1960, in a long line of bad
ordered B&O box cars in Caseyville, Illinois. It still had Tatum
doors
one, which was off its tracks was lying on the floor of the car. I
believe it was the first time I saw a XLT door. As you suggest, it
is
possible that some M-53s made it to the late 1950s still with their
Tatum doors.

Regards,

Bob Witt

Tim O'Connor wrote:


Thanks Bob. Since my modeling -begins- with 1955 I'll be waiting
for
the cars with replacement doors... but maybe an XLT will slip in
there.


I have 6 photos and/or Xeroxes of photos of M-53 and 1 M-53A all
still
with their Tatum "XLT" doors. Most are from the Anderson, Barkan
and
King Collection. The re-weigh dates range from 12-45 to 3-55. The
paint
schemes range from the early "13 Great States" to the late "13
Great
States" as described in the Barkan document. The re-weigh dates
from
the
1950s include 1950, 1951, 1952 (2), and 1953.

The last is a shop photo at Mt. Clare of a M-53 wearing the brand
new
"Billboard scheme". It was common for the B&O to do samples at
their
"mother shop", Mt. Clare in Baltimore, before changes were
released
system wide.

Based upon photos its appears the doors were replaced beginning
in
the
mid-1950s.

Bob Witt



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Decal water wet?

sctry
 

Denny,

I, too, have had similar experience with older Champ decals. I have just left them to absorb water through the backing paper until it falls way. Some times this may take as much as forty five minutes.

Chasing the tiny white lettering on the decal film is made easier if you use a glass ashtray paited BLACK on the outside as your vessel to soak in.

J. Greedy

--- In STMFC@..., dennyanspach <danspach@...> wrote:

A lot of interesting and critical replies:

My question arose from a recent experience with some relatively ancient, but otherwise still very fine Champ decals whose decal paper simply would not "wet" in any kind of timely fashion, forcing me to eventually "push" the decal off- hazarding the decal in the process (the paper was still almost dry underneath the film). Also, increasingly, I am placing my decal water in very shallow jar lids, etc. with the water only about 1/8"-3/16" deep. In this circumstance, of course the effects of surface tension are closer at hand. I use the shallow pan/dish so that tiny decals do not sink out of sight when I am futilely chasing them around the surface (surface tension effect), and there is much less water through which I must futilely fish around to at last find the little @#$%^&* (if I find it at all) when they sink.

I have always used tap water and never, ever had residue problems, but using distilled water would also also seem a no-brainer (is there an expected difference in surface tension between distilled water -no minerals-, and tap water -varying amounts and kinds of minerals?.

I like the PhotoFlo idea. I would expect one bottle to last both me, my children, and my grandchildren at the rate I would use it, however.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento








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