Date   

Re: The Irony of ACC & Slippery Plastic

Bill Welch
 

Dennis and everyone interested.

I tried this suggestion and after three days I am abandoning the suggested practice. I opened a new tube on Tuesday and stored it as Dennis suggested. I used it on Wednesday and there was some dried glue on the tip, but the opening was still mostly clear. On Friday afternoon, I removed the cap to deposit some more glue on my pallet and had to open the tip with a used #11 blade. I am returning to my previous practice of nursing the glue that always seem to stay in the tip when I squeeze enough out for use. Oh well.

Bill Welch

Bill,

Try this. Drill a hole in a scrap of wood to make a little holder for the tube (bottle). Each time you use it, replace the cap and store it in the holder CAP DOWN. This should keep liquid CA in the nozzle where you need it, while the air in the head space migrates upward to the inverted bottom of the tube. The worst that can happen, if enough moisture comes in to start to cure the CA, is that a hard film will build up in the bottom of the bottle, where it's out of the way. Of course, eventually enough will enter that it will catalyze the remaining CA and the whole rest of the bottle will get hard, but at least you won't have to fight with plugged nozzles until that happens.

Dennis


Re: New MDT book

Bill Welch
 

Mine is on order and I plan to take it to Cocoa Beach to have Roger sign it. I am also planning to take my PFE and SFRD books along and have them signed as well.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "Panhandle Division 1953" <prrinvt@...> wrote:

Listers,
I highly recommend the new MDT book for your resource library.
It is filled with photos, plans, and charts the serious modeler
will find hard to put down. Kudos to Roger Hinman for putting this great volume together.

Fred Freitas


Re: weighing reefers

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Clark Propst wrote:
I've been told that all reefers out of the local packinghouse were weighed. So, I also ask my operators to weigh a reefer from a poultry processor. Which brings up the question. How do they know how the weight of the ice in the car? Having just bought a turkey, it comes re-weighed. Therefore, wouldn't the poultry processor weigh each processed poultry? And using simple math know that the weigh of the load was? I've also read where there was a minimum weigh charge pre car for certain loads. Maybe that would effect how the load rate?
Many such shippers would have a "weight agreement," which meant they had certified their scale and could weigh the cargo themselves. Then the waybill would be annotated something like "SL&W" (for "shipper load & weigh) and some indication of the weight agreement number. As for weighing, the railroad always had the right to check the weight of any car, regardless of weight agreements, but a trustworthy shipper wouldn't get much of that. The ice could be estimated by an ice deck professional to the nearest 100 pounds, just by looking at the depth of ice, because that was the basis of icing charges (don't know how REALLY accurate they were, but that was how charges were determined). So the estimated ice weight would be subtracted from the net car weight (gross minus tare).
Minimum weights are all over the map for different cargoes, sometimes relatively small weights, sometimes really big ones. You'd need a tariff document to be sure for processed chicken.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Branchline Boxcar Kits

Joel Holmes <lehighvalley@...>
 

Hi Mark,

Yahoo strips attachments attachments. Can you load the file into the file
section?

Joel Holmes

Todd,



Attached is the BluePrint series catalog.



R,



Mark



From: Todd Horton [mailto:toddchorton@...]
Sent: Friday, November 25, 2011 5:26 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Branchline Boxcar Kits





Has anyone complied a list of the Branchline boxcar kits that list the
paint
and build dates for the cars they produced? This information was
available
on the website for Branchline before they sold out to Atlas. Atlas hasn't
listed this information as of yet. Todd Horton










Re: Branchline Boxcar Kits

Mark Stamm
 

Todd,



Attached is the BluePrint series catalog.



R,



Mark



From: Todd Horton [mailto:toddchorton@...]
Sent: Friday, November 25, 2011 5:26 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Branchline Boxcar Kits





Has anyone complied a list of the Branchline boxcar kits that list the paint
and build dates for the cars they produced? This information was available
on the website for Branchline before they sold out to Atlas. Atlas hasn't
listed this information as of yet. Todd Horton


Branchline Boxcar Kits

Todd Horton
 

Has anyone complied a list of the Branchline boxcar kits that list the paint and build dates for the cars they produced?  This information was available on the website for Branchline before they sold out to Atlas. Atlas hasn't listed this information as of yet. Todd Horton

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: weighing reefers

Greg Martin
 

Clark,

On any railroad's waybill/bill of lading there you have to declare the
total weight of the car's lading (Loaded weight - light weight of the car =
XXXXXX). This is noted on the waybill (declared as estimated weight "shippers
weights"), there is also a spot to declare the dunnage. The shipper will
have an approximate weight on the ice as he will be billed separately for
the ice as a charge by either a local ice house or a the railroad.

Since car loads were billed on a per hundred weight basis there very well
could have been a published tariff that was higher for less; however, I
have never run across one.

Greg Martin

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean


weighing reefers

Clark Propst
 

I've been told that all reefers out of the local packinghouse were weighed. So, I also ask my operators to weigh a reefer from a poultry processor. Which brings up the question. How do they know how the weight of the ice in the car? Having just bought a turkey, it comes re-weighed. Therefore, wouldn't the poultry processor weigh each processed poultry? And using simple math know that the weigh of the load was? I've also read where there was a minimum weigh charge pre car for certain loads. Maybe that would effect how the load rate?

Anyways, I'd like some help please sorting this all out, please...
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


HO Code 88 semi-scale wheelsets

Andy Carlson
 

I have some good news for those who have been patiently waiting for HO
Intermountain 33" semi-scale code 88 wheelsets to become available again.
Intermountain #40052, MSRP $10.00/12 axles.

I am offering these 12 packs of axles for $6.50 each (enough for 3 freight
cars). Shipping will be added.

I accept checks and money orders. With a 4% surcharge, I also accept PayPal. If
interested, contact me at <midcentury@...> OFF-LIST, Please!

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


New MDT book

Panhandle Division 1953 <prrinvt@...>
 

Listers,
I highly recommend the new MDT book for your resource library.
It is filled with photos, plans, and charts the serious modeler
will find hard to put down. Kudos to Roger Hinman for putting this great volume together.

Fred Freitas


Re: Car Builders Cyclopedias

Dave Nelson
 

For many years now I have been posting to STMFC current price listings from
used bookstores of various Car Builder's editions. I would think a search
of the archives using the string "FS:" plus "CBC" or "FS:" plus "Cyc" would
locate most of them. You can get a good feel for prices that way, which,
BTW, have been trending down.

Dave Nelson


Re: Car Builders Cyclopedias

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

George

Keep an eye out for "Trainshed Cyclopedias" -- many of these contain
reprints of the photos and drawings from Car Builder Cyclopedias and
a professional publication -- Railway Mechanical Engineer. I have often
seen these for sale for $5 each at train shows.
A couple comments about Trainshed Cyclopedias, and the Car Builder's Cyclopedia in general...

Newton K. Gregg (that was the name they were published under; I assume it was also the gentleman's name) first started by publishing full reprints of the early Car Builder's Dictionary, hard cover with cloth binding, essentially replicas of the original. He did the 1879 and 1906 Car Builder's Dictionary, and the 1911 Electric Railway Dictionary, the only edition of that publication. The books were not inexpensive,and I imagine the sales were less than stellar.

He then hit upon the idea of publishing just the portions people were willing to pay for in those long ago days of the 1970's, and that was the section that had general arrangement drawings and photos of the completed cars. His initial efforts focused on a single car type, combining pages from several editions of the CBC to trace the development of the cars.

The problem with this is that most modelers of the day didn't like to work from the general arrangement drawings, which only show a partial elevation and many sectional views. Indeed, these drawings in the CBC had been the source of many of the drawings published in the hobby press, after the draftsman used the data to generate full elevation views, and left off all of what modelers of the day considered clutter; the sectional views that showed how the car was actually built. So, much of what was in the early Trainshed Cyclopedias had been published before, or was considered a duplication of what had been. Meanwhile, what may be considered the most important data these books contained, the vendor's sections, was totally missing.

So, Gregg switched gears again, and started serializing complete editions of the CBC. The 1925 was reprinted in I think five issues of TSC, 1943 also. These were hardly complete reprints, but did at least include more drawings of details: ends, doors, roofs, trucks, and underframe details. There is, however, still a lot of material that gives context missing.

Each edition of the original Car Builder's Cyclopedia has a slightly different mix of material. One of the editions from the twenties has a lot of info on roofs; each of the three major vendors illustrated at least two of their offerings apiece. Other years, one of the vendors would only have a photo or two. The 1931 CBC, IIRC, presented the Postal regulations that governed the construction and equipping of mail cars in depth, which only, as I recall, appeared in that edition.

The WWII era was the heyday of the CBC; the 1940, '43, and '46 are big thick books of well over a thousand pages. The 1940 is 1350. In contrast, the editions from the fifties run around 1100. After 1960, the books become considerably less useful. Inclusion of locomotive material reduced the number of pages devoted to freight and passenger cars, not that there were many passenger cars to present, other than rapid transit. During the sixties all those excruciatingly detailed drawings went away, replaced by what were little more than sketches drawn with just enough detail to hand some major dimensions on.

Simmons-Boardman effectively stopped publishing the Car and Locomotive Cyclopedia with the 1984 edition. An inquiry years later, in the mid 90's revealed that they still had them in stock, which is when I bought mine. The publication had one last gasp with the 1997 edition, which has the appearance of being done mostly for the fans... each section has a retrospective of the key points in the development of the current state-of-the-art. Other than that, it is essentially useless as a reference.

Dennis


Re: Giving Thanks

O Fenton Wells
 

Amen to that!
fenton Wells

On Thu, Nov 24, 2011 at 9:57 PM, mike brock <brockm@...> wrote:

**


Richard Hendrickson writes:

As this is a day for giving thanks, it seems appropriate to convey
our appreciation to Mike Brock and Jeff Aley for their ongoing
efforts to keep this enormously informative and useful STMFC group
going. Thanks, guys!
And Schuyler Larrabee Says:

"Hear! Hear! Complete agreement!"

I think I can speak for Jeff in saying that the real thanks should be
directed to those that provide information to the group about frt cars.
Certainly Richard and Schuyler are in the forefront of those supplying
such
information...without which all of the group's management activies would
be
as useful as...well...a train of N&W hoppers in San Francisco.

So, thanks to all of you...those with information and willing to share it
and those seeking it. It's a nice and very effective handshake that works
to
generate an active and interesting group.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner




--
Fenton Wells
3047 Creek Run
Sanford NC 27332
919-499-5545
srrfan1401@...


Re: Giving Thanks

mike brock <brockm@...>
 

Richard Hendrickson writes:

As this is a day for giving thanks, it seems appropriate to convey
our appreciation to Mike Brock and Jeff Aley for their ongoing
efforts to keep this enormously informative and useful STMFC group
going. Thanks, guys!
And Schuyler Larrabee Says:

"Hear! Hear! Complete agreement!"

I think I can speak for Jeff in saying that the real thanks should be directed to those that provide information to the group about frt cars. Certainly Richard and Schuyler are in the forefront of those supplying such information...without which all of the group's management activies would be as useful as...well...a train of N&W hoppers in San Francisco.

So, thanks to all of you...those with information and willing to share it and those seeking it. It's a nice and very effective handshake that works to generate an active and interesting group.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: Giving Thanks

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Hear! Hear! Complete agreement!



Schuyler



As this is a day for giving thanks, it seems appropriate to convey
our appreciation to Mike Brock and Jeff Aley for their ongoing
efforts to keep this enormously informative and useful STMFC group
going. Thanks, guys!

Richard Hendrickson

[





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Giving Thanks

Richard Hendrickson
 

As this is a day for giving thanks, it seems appropriate to convey
our appreciation to Mike Brock and Jeff Aley for their ongoing
efforts to keep this enormously informative and useful STMFC group
going. Thanks, guys!

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Tennessee Central Boxcar - Truck ID

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

Brian,



Many thanks.



Jim Brewer

----- Original Message -----


From: "brian" <brianleppert@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, November 24, 2011 2:16:50 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tennessee Central Boxcar - Truck ID

 




OK, I've seen a photo of one of these car's trucks. The truck could be described as "conventional", as it has a spring-plank and four springs per side frame, grouped close together.

I think that my Buckeye HO truck (TMW-106/206) would be your best bet. The bolster end is different, but you can't have everything <grin>.

Anyone interested in more info on my trucks can contact me OFF-LIST at

brianleppert@...

and I can email all the stuff.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

--- In STMFC@... , "James F. Brewer" <jfbrewer@> wrote:



I am finishing a Smokey Mountain Model Works kit of TC 40 foot, 40 ton boxcar in the 7900 series and need help in identifying an appropriate HO scale truck for use with this model.  The proto info with the kit, via Ed Hawkins, indicates these cars were part of PS Lot 5655 and had "AAR spring plank type (ASF) trucks.

Suggestions?  Many thanks.

Jim Brewer

Glenwood MD


Re: car builders cyclopedia

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

David,
 
Thank you ever so much for the link.
I just found 5 things I have been looking for.
 
Fred Freitas


________________________________
From: david zuhn <david.zuhn@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, November 24, 2011 2:22 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] car builders cyclopedia


 
How about this:

http://www.vintageliterature.ca/cat_railroading.cfm

They also have a couple of free downloads (Shay Catalog and a Railroad
Fireman's magazine), but I can't get the downloads to work for me.

--
david d zuhn Saint Paul Bridge & Terminal Ry.
zoo @ stpaulterminal.org






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Small-diameter tube and other neat stuff...

VINCE PUGLIESE
 

Don't forget to check out Small Parts (www.smallparts.com) for small tubing. They have some listed at 0.009" outside diameter.
 
.vp


________________________________
From: Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, November 24, 2011 12:27:26 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Small-diameter tube and other neat stuff...



 

I read on another list that Des Plaines Hobby will soon offer this product imported from the UK. Looks like a lot of useful stuff for STMFC modellers, with copper and aluminum tube as small as 1 mm diameter (.041"). Divide the metric measurments in the brochure by 25.4 to get inch sizes--

http://www.albionalloys.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/Metric-Leaflet-2010-GBP.pdf

Steve Lucas.




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: car builders cyclopedia

david zuhn
 

How about this:

http://www.vintageliterature.ca/cat_railroading.cfm

They also have a couple of free downloads (Shay Catalog and a Railroad
Fireman's magazine), but I can't get the downloads to work for me.

--
david d zuhn Saint Paul Bridge & Terminal Ry.
zoo @ stpaulterminal.org