Date   

Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Republic Creosoting Company Plant, Indianapolis, Indiana, October 27, 1934

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Ken;

 

I think it is intentional, since they are loading the cars in a way the pole load goes over where the brake assembly was mounted.  I have some other pics that have the wheel, shaft and coupling also laid on the deck.

 

PRR’s FM’s originally came with brake shafts on both ends, and the left end is overhung by the load, so that set would have had to be temporarily removed.  It also looks very much like a PRR brake wheel.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of akerboomk
Sent: Friday, May 7, 2021 1:22 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Republic Creosoting Company Plant, Indianapolis, Indiana, October 27, 1934

 

Love the brake wheel on the “2nd from left end” car

I assume “intentionally disconnected”, but could be a “whoops”?


--
Ken Akerboom


Re: Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...>
 

Jack,

Thanks for the additions and corrections on this story. I did not know that the Sierra cars were separate from the YV group. As for the McCloud River car or cars, they could have come from either group, or might have been from the PG&E like the Yreka Western car. I have a very poor negative of a McCloud car from the early 1960s. It was BARELY worth the effort to scan and attach even for discussion purposes, but then I was only 12 years old and using a cheap camera (probably a Kodak 127 Brownie Starmite with a lens like a soda pop bottle). Ah, the things I missed in those days!

Another that I missed was what I thought was one of these hoppers on a flatbed truck on the McArthur Freeway in Oakland when I was stationed in the Bay Area during the late 1970s. It went one way and I went the other at the split for the Oakland Bay Bridge. There wasn't time to make a certain ID.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆








On Fri, May 7, 2021 at 11:46 AM Jack Burgess <jack@...> wrote:

Garth…

 

Your summary is fairly accurate.

 

For a long time, all of the Yosemite Portland Cement buildings (except for the 275-ton storage bin which was used to load the cars and the buildings at the top of the incline) where still there were until destroyed by forest fires a decade ago. The quarry was located about a mile from the top of the incline and limestone was transported from the quarry to the crusher at the top of the incline by standard-gauge Plymouth locomotives.

 

Henry J. Kaiser (one of the Six Companies which built Boulder Dam) later wanted to get the bid to construct a dam in Northern California but didn’t get the contract so he submitted a bid to supply the concrete cement for the project. After winning the bid, he built a very efficient cement plant west of the San Francisco Bay and could then outbid all of the other cement companies in California. Those companies were in collusion, letting one company submit a high bid on a project and still get the contract. YPC was one of those companies and knew that they could not compete against Kaiser Permanente (yes, Henry Kaiser also started Kaiser Permanente hospitals). Kaiser offered to purchase YPC since he knew that he could sell the equipment for more than the purchase price.

 

The YV purchased 51 hopper cars in 1924 and initially used them to deliver rock to make concrete for the construction of a dam on the Merced River (which resulted in the relocation of 24 miles of YV mainline and the construction of five steel bridges) so the hopper cars were called “rock cars” on the YV. The Sierra Railroad purchased some identical cars for the construction of a dam near its mainline. Upon abandonment of the YV, 3 cars were sold to Amador Central Railroad, 10 to the Apache Railway, 4 to Santa Maria Railroad, and 32 to Kaiser interests in Southern California. The car in Yreka was actually an ex-Pacific Gas and Electric car, apparently purchased directly from the company that was selling the ex-GN cars.

 

Interesting question about moving the cars with archbar trucks. Possibly the fact that they were not loaded got around that issue.

 

As mentioned, Westersfield has a kit for these cars. After Al Westerfield released a kit for a longer version of the same car design, I asked him to considered releasing a kit for the 22-foot car and that I could give him detail photos of the cars since the Sierra Railroad had three of these cars on display along the highway leading to Jamestown. Al later told me that it was the first kit that he released that was for a car which still existed.

 

Attached us a photo of some of the Westerfield rock cars at the 275-ton storage bin at Emory on my layout.

 

Jack Burgess

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
Sent: Friday, May 7, 2021 4:48 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

 

Friends,

 

While scanning up prints from my collection, I happened upon this view of the Yosemite Portland Cement Co. incline at Emory, California. I snapped the photo around 1967, and it shows the grade down from the loading bins near the top of the mountain. Recent photos posted online show this hasn't changed much, except the roof on the bin house is now gone. 

 

O.K., this isn't a freight car, but wait Grasshopper, and all shall be revealed.

 

The YPCCo. went into business in the 1920s. It's quarries were located atop this mountain above the Merced River on the Yosemite Valley Railroad. The stone was lowered to the YV via this double-track incline. From here the YV hauled the limestone to kilns near Merced, California, where the stone was burned to make cement. There is a nice web site with photos at http://memorableplaces.com/yvrr/CEMENT/YPCo.Blind.html . In 1944 the whole company was sold to Henry J. Kaiser (yes, the Liberty Ship guy). He immediately dismantled the kilns and other machinery which were sold to a concern in Venezuela. It isn't clear if any equipment from the Emory quarries also went to Venezuela, or if it was just scrapped. Kaiser is said to have bought the YPCCo. just to eliminate a competitor, though that may just be bad PR. It is possible the quarries were nearly played out, or that the YPCCo. was becoming unprofitable due to the quarry location and shipping costs.

 

In any case, with the timber operations that fed the YV gone and automobiles cutting into their passenger traffic even before WWII, the loss of the limestone traffic was the last straw for the YV. The line shut down a few months later.

 

O.K. Here come the freight cars. The YV owned a small fleet of ex-Great Northern ore cars to cover the limestone traffic. There were, IIRC, 50 cars in this fleet. The Sierra Railroad bought some of these, and several are still at Jamestown on display at Railtown 1897, and one more in Sacramento at the CSRM (in hideous orange paint when I last saw it, though the cars seem to have been black on the Sierra). A few others were cast off to other shortlines for maintenance-of-way purposes. Without a detailed roster I can't say if they were sold directly by the YV or its scrappers to these other lines, or were for a time they were owned by the SRR. McCloud River Railroad had several, Amador Central owned two, and the Yreka Western had at least one, though as my father's photo shows, this car still had the GN side walkways, and may have come directly to the YW from the GN. How these got from the YV to the buyers with their archbar trucks circa 1945 is a head scratcher, but possibly the cars had variances for one-time moves.

 

Westerfield offers this kit in several road names, including the VY as their 3452. It is still in their catalog.

 

Maybe Jack Burgess will want to chime in here, as the YV is his special interest and I may have garbled some things in this summary.

 

Yours Aye,

 

 

Garth Groff  🦆


Re: Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Thanks for the explanation Dennis…!

 

Jack

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Friday, May 7, 2021 10:36 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

 

On Fri, May 7, 2021 at 08:46 AM, Jack Burgess wrote:

 

Interesting question about moving the cars with archbar trucks. Possibly the fact that they were not loaded got around that issue.

You realize that in our time frame the "ban" on archbar trucks simply said they couldn't be offered in unrestricted interchange. The railroads were free to haul anything that they could be persuaded to agree to. It was common practice for the railroads to agree to haul obsolete equipment on the basis of 'to home shop for repair'. This relieved them from the obligation to repair the equipment for the ARA fixed charges should it break down en route. Back in my early days of railway museum involvement in the seventies we had a lot of things delivered on its own wheels that would NEVER be accepted in interchange.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, May 7, 2021 at 08:46 AM, Jack Burgess wrote:

 

Interesting question about moving the cars with archbar trucks. Possibly the fact that they were not loaded got around that issue.

You realize that in our time frame the "ban" on archbar trucks simply said they couldn't be offered in unrestricted interchange. The railroads were free to haul anything that they could be persuaded to agree to. It was common practice for the railroads to agree to haul obsolete equipment on the basis of 'to home shop for repair'. This relieved them from the obligation to repair the equipment for the ARA fixed charges should it break down en route. Back in my early days of railway museum involvement in the seventies we had a lot of things delivered on its own wheels that would NEVER be accepted in interchange.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Republic Creosoting Company Plant, Indianapolis, Indiana, October 27, 1934

akerboomk
 

Love the brake wheel on the “2nd from left end” car

I assume “intentionally disconnected”, but could be a “whoops”?


--
Ken Akerboom


Re: New HO scale freight car kits

Brian Carlson
 

Build the master for them.   

Brian J. Carlson 

On May 7, 2021, at 12:55 PM, lrkdbn via groups.io <lrkdbn@...> wrote:

I wish RCW would consider the similar NYC 8 stake gondola as a subject-this was a very common car in the 1922-1950 period
Larry King


Photo: Unloading Something From A Boxcar

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Unloading Something From A Boxcar

Photo from the Wisconsin Historical Society:

https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Records/Image/IM94069

I believe the description for this photo is incorrect.

What I see are bags of some dry material being unloaded and mixed in the rear of the truck.

I also see what may be a scale near the boxcar door, possibly for weighing the material in the bags.

I’m guessing here.

What do other see?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: New HO scale freight car kits

lrkdbn
 

I wish RCW would consider the similar NYC 8 stake gondola as a subject-this was a very common car in the 1922-1950 period
Larry King


CB&Q Livestock Car: Single Deck? Double Deck?

Bob Chaparro
 

CB&Q Livestock Car: Single Deck? Double Deck?

Diane Wolfgram sent me a photo of a Leadville Designs N-scale CB&Q livestock car No. 59358. She requested a prototype photo for comparison.

The prototype CB&Q car was in series 58000-59499.

I had a photo of CB&Q 58214, 58214D to be exact…a double-deck car.

The January 1955 Official Equipment Register lists cars in that series as single-deck cars. So, what’s going on here?

The listing for the 58000-59499 series included a Note E. A reading of Note E revealed a simple answer, seen below.

The Leadville Designs kit: https://leadvilledesigns.com/products/n-cb-q-36-steel-frame-58000-59000-stock-cars

Bob Chaparro

Moderator
Railway Bull Shippers Group

 

https://groups.io/g/RailwayBullShippersGroup


Re: PRR X29B and X29D

Schleigh Mike
 

Hello Elden & Group!!

This 'cheat sheet' is a great reference to help model well these interesting cars.  Thank you for sharing this.  In spite of it, I still have a couple of questions addressing the brake equipment.  You have noted that the layout is per the drawing below and, without doubt, this is wonderful and seemingly applicable to the 'plain' X29 cars that received AB conversations of their KD brakes.

However, both Funaro & Camerlengo (F&C) kits No. 8160 for the X29B and No. 8310 for the X29D (early) as well Sunshine Models (SM) kit No.U1.1 for the X29B show the arrangement differently than that below.  All those kits reflect the use of the rather generic layout like that of the original Cal-Scale arrangement.  Especially obvious is the absence of the Penny's use of the 'pressure head' style of cylinder providing the fulcrum anchor for the 'floating' second lever.  So the question is---Would this more 'conventional' arrangement have been applied to any of the X29 plain cars or perhaps to any of the "B" or "D" rebuilds?  My expectation is "No."  Elden's diagram is found in RP CYC No. 26, page 84 as well as the WrightTrack instructions for the X29D (late).  Ben Hom's second Mainline Modeler article on the X29 included a drawing for the passenger equipped X29 and this is very close to Elden's but relating the 'signal' air line details.  RP CYC  No. 24 discussing the original X29 cars has several images showing the reservoir mounted transversely.  This must have been a minority option as most photos seem to be per the Elden layout.

So, to be clear----

1)  Are the F&C and SM instructions for X29B and X29D brake equipment layout simply wrong and is the Elden layout consistent for all these rebuilt cars?

2)  Is the Elden drawing for the rebuilt cars also applicable to the plain X29 cars re-equipped with AB?

3)  Is there any logic to finding  the transversely mounted reservoir?  They seem to be found only on the last production (Dreadnaught ends) cars as if the two-chamber reservoir replaced the original single style in the same location.  Was this consistent throughout the group?

Obviously, photos are most helpful to accurate modeling but......

4)  If we want to model a certain car number from a particular date but have no photo, can we at least be relatively certain that a given brake arrangement applies to that car?

5)  Elden notes that Branchline (now Atlas) car bodies are applicable for the three body/door sizes for the X29B and two styles of X29D.  Can those Branch/Atlas part numbers be made known?

Thank you Elden and thank all in advance for contributions responsive to the questions above.

Regards from Grove City, Penna. where it is cold and raining----Mike Schleigh


On Monday, April 12, 2021, 01:29:34 PM EDT, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:


Here’s the “cheat sheet” for what you need on your X29B or X29D:

 

6

X29B

27513

27554

27663

 

27901

 

28123

28460

 

28647

28730

29412

29646

30001

30012

30036

30613

30689

 

30753

30814

30949

30998

Sunshine

Vol 2 p.34

Burg

 

Burg

 

Bob

Lane

 

Vol 2 p.34

Vol 3 p.51

CWinters

RPC26

Suns - Burg

Vol 2 p.34

Burg

Vol 3 p.52

Vol 3 p.51

 

RPC26

Vol 2 p.34

Bob

Vol 1 p.71

SK Calendar; ? RB; Ajax brakes

CK; Apex RB; ? brakes

PK; Universal brakes; reinforced sidesill

SK Calendar P712-6-54; unknown brakes

SK;; ptd 8/54; Morton r/b;

CK new 3/51; +end pic) Apex RB; Ureco brakes

SK;

CK; Ureco brakes

SK1a calendar 7/54; ?RB; ?brakes

SK; calendar; 1954

CK; Apex RB; Ureco brakes

SK

PK; Ureco brakes; reinforced sidesill

PK

SK calendar; Apex RB; Klasing?? brakes

CK; Klasing brake

MS1; Apex r/b; Ureco? ; >3/57

MS1; Apex r/b; post 4/61

Sunshine; Funaro & Camerlengo; Branchline 40-foot 7-foot door  w/new u/f and side sills

 

 

 

 

4

X29D

23635

 

23901

 

23960

23963

 

24018

 

24083

 

24085

24086

24115

24166

 

24255

 

24270

24352

 

24359

24361

 

24733

25146

 

255xx?

26194

 

26247

E20851

 

unk

 

Bob

unk

 

Vol 2 p.36

 

Bob

 

Bob

CFC/Bob v.1p.31

Vol 3 p.52

 

JSands/Bob

 

Vol 3 p.52

Vol 1 p.73

 

Vol 1 p.76

CFC 7 p.51

 

M.Bernard

Unk

 

E20943-

PRR StmYr2

E21325

Hagley

SK; new rblt; Apex RB/Ajax brakes; low door boards; 6/55

SK; ? RB/? Brakes; low door boards; >7/55

SK; “Don’t..” slogan – white? Lo bds

SK; “Don’t..” slogan; ?/?RB;? brakes mid-60s low dr&end bds

SK; White “Don’t..” slogan; no paint roof/Apex RB; Klasing?

SK; White “Don’t..” slogan; ?RB low dr board; 8/55

SK; “Don’t..” slogan; ?color; lo bds

SK; Yellow “Don’t..” slogan; 8/55

SK; Yellow “Don’t..” slogan

SK; White “Don’t slogan; ?rb/Klasing brake low boards rblt; 8/55

SK; White “Don’t…” slogan; Apex RB low boards; Klasing brake; 8/55

SK; White “Don’t…” slogan

SK; White “Don’t…” slogan; Ajax brake

SK; White “Don’t…” slogan

SK; White “Don’t…” slogan low boards 1963

SK no slogan low boards rblt 9/55

SK no slogan low boards; rblt 10/55; Apex; Universal Brake;late IDE

CK; early IDE, but bad photo; p.64

SK; hi boards!; “blt 8/24” added racks 10/57 for Grand Rapids

CK; hi boards; rolling pin IDE, Apex; Ajax 2/60+

Branchline 40-foot 7-foot door  w/new u/f and side sills;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24166 with Klasing Brake

 

Elden Gatwood


Re: Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Eric…

 

I had rumors about one of these cars in Colorado a few decades ago but nothing specific. Your comment seems to confirm that rumor.

 

Jack Burgess

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Eric Hansmann
Sent: Friday, May 7, 2021 7:04 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

 

I saw one or two of these hoppers at the Georgetown Loop Railroad back in 1985. I believe they were used in ballast service.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
Sent: Friday, May 7, 2021 6:48 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

 

Friends,

 

While scanning up prints from my collection, I happened upon this view of the Yosemite Portland Cement Co. incline at Emory, California. I snapped the photo around 1967, and it shows the grade down from the loading bins near the top of the mountain. Recent photos posted online show this hasn't changed much, except the roof on the bin house is now gone. 

 

O.K., this isn't a freight car, but wait Grasshopper, and all shall be revealed.

 

The YPCCo. went into business in the 1920s. It's quarries were located atop this mountain above the Merced River on the Yosemite Valley Railroad. The stone was lowered to the YV via this double-track incline. From here the YV hauled the limestone to kilns near Merced, California, where the stone was burned to make cement. There is a nice web site with photos at http://memorableplaces.com/yvrr/CEMENT/YPCo.Blind.html . In 1944 the whole company was sold to Henry J. Kaiser (yes, the Liberty Ship guy). He immediately dismantled the kilns and other machinery which were sold to a concern in Venezuela. It isn't clear if any equipment from the Emory quarries also went to Venezuela, or if it was just scrapped. Kaiser is said to have bought the YPCCo. just to eliminate a competitor, though that may just be bad PR. It is possible the quarries were nearly played out, or that the YPCCo. was becoming unprofitable due to the quarry location and shipping costs.

 

In any case, with the timber operations that fed the YV gone and automobiles cutting into their passenger traffic even before WWII, the loss of the limestone traffic was the last straw for the YV. The line shut down a few months later.

 

O.K. Here come the freight cars. The YV owned a small fleet of ex-Great Northern ore cars to cover the limestone traffic. There were, IIRC, 50 cars in this fleet. The Sierra Railroad bought some of these, and several are still at Jamestown on display at Railtown 1897, and one more in Sacramento at the CSRM (in hideous orange paint when I last saw it, though the cars seem to have been black on the Sierra). A few others were cast off to other shortlines for maintenance-of-way purposes. Without a detailed roster I can't say if they were sold directly by the YV or its scrappers to these other lines, or were for a time they were owned by the SRR. McCloud River Railroad had several, Amador Central owned two, and the Yreka Western had at least one, though as my father's photo shows, this car still had the GN side walkways, and may have come directly to the YW from the GN. How these got from the YV to the buyers with their archbar trucks circa 1945 is a head scratcher, but possibly the cars had variances for one-time moves.

 

Westerfield offers this kit in several road names, including the VY as their 3452. It is still in their catalog.

 

Maybe Jack Burgess will want to chime in here, as the YV is his special interest and I may have garbled some things in this summary.

 

Yours Aye,

 

 

Garth Groff  🦆


Re: Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Garth…

 

Your summary is fairly accurate.

 

For a long time, all of the Yosemite Portland Cement buildings (except for the 275-ton storage bin which was used to load the cars and the buildings at the top of the incline) where still there were until destroyed by forest fires a decade ago. The quarry was located about a mile from the top of the incline and limestone was transported from the quarry to the crusher at the top of the incline by standard-gauge Plymouth locomotives.

 

Henry J. Kaiser (one of the Six Companies which built Boulder Dam) later wanted to get the bid to construct a dam in Northern California but didn’t get the contract so he submitted a bid to supply the concrete cement for the project. After winning the bid, he built a very efficient cement plant west of the San Francisco Bay and could then outbid all of the other cement companies in California. Those companies were in collusion, letting one company submit a high bid on a project and still get the contract. YPC was one of those companies and knew that they could not compete against Kaiser Permanente (yes, Henry Kaiser also started Kaiser Permanente hospitals). Kaiser offered to purchase YPC since he knew that he could sell the equipment for more than the purchase price.

 

The YV purchased 51 hopper cars in 1924 and initially used them to deliver rock to make concrete for the construction of a dam on the Merced River (which resulted in the relocation of 24 miles of YV mainline and the construction of five steel bridges) so the hopper cars were called “rock cars” on the YV. The Sierra Railroad purchased some identical cars for the construction of a dam near its mainline. Upon abandonment of the YV, 3 cars were sold to Amador Central Railroad, 10 to the Apache Railway, 4 to Santa Maria Railroad, and 32 to Kaiser interests in Southern California. The car in Yreka was actually an ex-Pacific Gas and Electric car, apparently purchased directly from the company that was selling the ex-GN cars.

 

Interesting question about moving the cars with archbar trucks. Possibly the fact that they were not loaded got around that issue.

 

As mentioned, Westersfield has a kit for these cars. After Al Westerfield released a kit for a longer version of the same car design, I asked him to considered releasing a kit for the 22-foot car and that I could give him detail photos of the cars since the Sierra Railroad had three of these cars on display along the highway leading to Jamestown. Al later told me that it was the first kit that he released that was for a car which still existed.

 

Attached us a photo of some of the Westerfield rock cars at the 275-ton storage bin at Emory on my layout.

 

Jack Burgess

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
Sent: Friday, May 7, 2021 4:48 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

 

Friends,

 

While scanning up prints from my collection, I happened upon this view of the Yosemite Portland Cement Co. incline at Emory, California. I snapped the photo around 1967, and it shows the grade down from the loading bins near the top of the mountain. Recent photos posted online show this hasn't changed much, except the roof on the bin house is now gone. 

 

O.K., this isn't a freight car, but wait Grasshopper, and all shall be revealed.

 

The YPCCo. went into business in the 1920s. It's quarries were located atop this mountain above the Merced River on the Yosemite Valley Railroad. The stone was lowered to the YV via this double-track incline. From here the YV hauled the limestone to kilns near Merced, California, where the stone was burned to make cement. There is a nice web site with photos at http://memorableplaces.com/yvrr/CEMENT/YPCo.Blind.html . In 1944 the whole company was sold to Henry J. Kaiser (yes, the Liberty Ship guy). He immediately dismantled the kilns and other machinery which were sold to a concern in Venezuela. It isn't clear if any equipment from the Emory quarries also went to Venezuela, or if it was just scrapped. Kaiser is said to have bought the YPCCo. just to eliminate a competitor, though that may just be bad PR. It is possible the quarries were nearly played out, or that the YPCCo. was becoming unprofitable due to the quarry location and shipping costs.

 

In any case, with the timber operations that fed the YV gone and automobiles cutting into their passenger traffic even before WWII, the loss of the limestone traffic was the last straw for the YV. The line shut down a few months later.

 

O.K. Here come the freight cars. The YV owned a small fleet of ex-Great Northern ore cars to cover the limestone traffic. There were, IIRC, 50 cars in this fleet. The Sierra Railroad bought some of these, and several are still at Jamestown on display at Railtown 1897, and one more in Sacramento at the CSRM (in hideous orange paint when I last saw it, though the cars seem to have been black on the Sierra). A few others were cast off to other shortlines for maintenance-of-way purposes. Without a detailed roster I can't say if they were sold directly by the YV or its scrappers to these other lines, or were for a time they were owned by the SRR. McCloud River Railroad had several, Amador Central owned two, and the Yreka Western had at least one, though as my father's photo shows, this car still had the GN side walkways, and may have come directly to the YW from the GN. How these got from the YV to the buyers with their archbar trucks circa 1945 is a head scratcher, but possibly the cars had variances for one-time moves.

 

Westerfield offers this kit in several road names, including the VY as their 3452. It is still in their catalog.

 

Maybe Jack Burgess will want to chime in here, as the YV is his special interest and I may have garbled some things in this summary.

 

Yours Aye,

 

 

Garth Groff  🦆


One more time: WCHX type X tank car

Andy Carlson
 

I saw that the image was somehow dropped out of my message.Try this again.


On Friday, May 7, 2021, 8:15:53 AM PDT, Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:


Maybe this has been shared before, but a color shot of a framed type X tank car in LA's Taylor yard deserves some re-viewing. WCHX 4095 with AB brakes, believed to be circa 1958.


Inline image





-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


WCHX type X tank car

Andy Carlson
 

Maybe this has been shared before, but a color shot of a framed type X tank car in LA's Taylor yard deserves some re-viewing. WCHX 4095 with AB brakes, believed to be circa 1958.


Inline image



-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Republic Creosoting Company Plant, Indianapolis, Indiana, October 27, 1934

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Plenty of PRR class FM flat cars in this image...
 
Republic Creosoting Company Plant, Indianapolis, Indiana, October 27, 1934
 
 
(Note: the above image is large enough that some browsers have trouble handling it - if so, try the link below)
 
More info at the link below...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

Eric Hansmann
 

I saw one or two of these hoppers at the Georgetown Loop Railroad back in 1985. I believe they were used in ballast service.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
Sent: Friday, May 7, 2021 6:48 AM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

 

Friends,

 

While scanning up prints from my collection, I happened upon this view of the Yosemite Portland Cement Co. incline at Emory, California. I snapped the photo around 1967, and it shows the grade down from the loading bins near the top of the mountain. Recent photos posted online show this hasn't changed much, except the roof on the bin house is now gone. 

 

O.K., this isn't a freight car, but wait Grasshopper, and all shall be revealed.

 

The YPCCo. went into business in the 1920s. It's quarries were located atop this mountain above the Merced River on the Yosemite Valley Railroad. The stone was lowered to the YV via this double-track incline. From here the YV hauled the limestone to kilns near Merced, California, where the stone was burned to make cement. There is a nice web site with photos at http://memorableplaces.com/yvrr/CEMENT/YPCo.Blind.html . In 1944 the whole company was sold to Henry J. Kaiser (yes, the Liberty Ship guy). He immediately dismantled the kilns and other machinery which were sold to a concern in Venezuela. It isn't clear if any equipment from the Emory quarries also went to Venezuela, or if it was just scrapped. Kaiser is said to have bought the YPCCo. just to eliminate a competitor, though that may just be bad PR. It is possible the quarries were nearly played out, or that the YPCCo. was becoming unprofitable due to the quarry location and shipping costs.

 

In any case, with the timber operations that fed the YV gone and automobiles cutting into their passenger traffic even before WWII, the loss of the limestone traffic was the last straw for the YV. The line shut down a few months later.

 

O.K. Here come the freight cars. The YV owned a small fleet of ex-Great Northern ore cars to cover the limestone traffic. There were, IIRC, 50 cars in this fleet. The Sierra Railroad bought some of these, and several are still at Jamestown on display at Railtown 1897, and one more in Sacramento at the CSRM (in hideous orange paint when I last saw it, though the cars seem to have been black on the Sierra). A few others were cast off to other shortlines for maintenance-of-way purposes. Without a detailed roster I can't say if they were sold directly by the YV or its scrappers to these other lines, or were for a time they were owned by the SRR. McCloud River Railroad had several, Amador Central owned two, and the Yreka Western had at least one, though as my father's photo shows, this car still had the GN side walkways, and may have come directly to the YW from the GN. How these got from the YV to the buyers with their archbar trucks circa 1945 is a head scratcher, but possibly the cars had variances for one-time moves.

 

Westerfield offers this kit in several road names, including the VY as their 3452. It is still in their catalog.

 

Maybe Jack Burgess will want to chime in here, as the YV is his special interest and I may have garbled some things in this summary.

 

Yours Aye,

 

 

Garth Groff  🦆


Re: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] Resemble Grease

Brian Stokes
 

Vallejo makes some great weathering effects that resemble all kinds of grease and grime. I have a few that I have been experimenting with for journal boxes, etc. 

--
Brian Stokes
North Point Street in Proto:48


Re: Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 


Hi Garth and List Members,
 
I made a visit to the Sierra Railroad at Jamestown during the late 1990s. I saw at least one of these cars, could even still read the GREAT NORTHERN road name on it, and I did wonder what the car was doing there. Now I know - thanks.
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, May 07, 2021 7:48 AM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Yosemite Portland Cement Incline

Friends,

While scanning up prints from my collection, I happened upon this view of the Yosemite Portland Cement Co. incline at Emory, California. I snapped the photo around 1967, and it shows the grade down from the loading bins near the top of the mountain. Recent photos posted online show this hasn't changed much, except the roof on the bin house is now gone. 

O.K., this isn't a freight car, but wait Grasshopper, and all shall be revealed.

The YPCCo. went into business in the 1920s. It's quarries were located atop this mountain above the Merced River on the Yosemite Valley Railroad. The stone was lowered to the YV via this double-track incline. From here the YV hauled the limestone to kilns near Merced, California, where the stone was burned to make cement. There is a nice web site with photos at http://memorableplaces.com/yvrr/CEMENT/YPCo.Blind.html . In 1944 the whole company was sold to Henry J. Kaiser (yes, the Liberty Ship guy). He immediately dismantled the kilns and other machinery which were sold to a concern in Venezuela. It isn't clear if any equipment from the Emory quarries also went to Venezuela, or if it was just scrapped. Kaiser is said to have bought the YPCCo. just to eliminate a competitor, though that may just be bad PR. It is possible the quarries were nearly played out, or that the YPCCo. was becoming unprofitable due to the quarry location and shipping costs.

In any case, with the timber operations that fed the YV gone and automobiles cutting into their passenger traffic even before WWII, the loss of the limestone traffic was the last straw for the YV. The line shut down a few months later.

O.K. Here come the freight cars. The YV owned a small fleet of ex-Great Northern ore cars to cover the limestone traffic. There were, IIRC, 50 cars in this fleet. The Sierra Railroad bought some of these, and several are still at Jamestown on display at Railtown 1897, and one more in Sacramento at the CSRM (in hideous orange paint when I last saw it, though the cars seem to have been black on the Sierra). A few others were cast off to other shortlines for maintenance-of-way purposes. Without a detailed roster I can't say if they were sold directly by the YV or its scrappers to these other lines, or were for a time they were owned by the SRR. McCloud River Railroad had several, Amador Central owned two, and the Yreka Western had at least one, though as my father's photo shows, this car still had the GN side walkways, and may have come directly to the YW from the GN. How these got from the YV to the buyers with their archbar trucks circa 1945 is a head scratcher, but possibly the cars had variances for one-time moves.

Westerfield offers this kit in several road names, including the VY as their 3452. It is still in their catalog.

Maybe Jack Burgess will want to chime in here, as the YV is his special interest and I may have garbled some things in this summary.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Re: New HO scale freight car kits

Ken Soroos
 

Yes, Matt.  The kit includes the as-built Pullman-Standard lettering for Soo Line (and DSS&A for the other kit).

Ken Soroos

On May 7, 2021, at 8:39 AM, Matthew Hurst <handbt33@...> wrote:

Any chance that Soo line car has 1940s era lettering included? 

Just wondering. 

Thanks

Matthew Hurst



On May 7, 2021, at 8:32 AM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:


Resin Car Works has released a couple new HO scale freight car kits. The release announcement for the L&N steel gondola and Soo/DSS&A boxcar kits is posted on the RCW blog.


Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy



Re: New HO scale freight car kits

Matthew Hurst
 

Any chance that Soo line car has 1940s era lettering included? 

Just wondering. 

Thanks

Matthew Hurst



On May 7, 2021, at 8:32 AM, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:


Resin Car Works has released a couple new HO scale freight car kits. The release announcement for the L&N steel gondola and Soo/DSS&A boxcar kits is posted on the RCW blog.


Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy

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