Date   

Re: Auto Haulers

Mark
 

Excuse me but I was pointing out the freight cars in the background. Year of fords sounds great but those cars(various) look better, wish we could get a better view of the rolling stock.

Regards, Mark Morgan
PS have owned one ford

--- In STMFC@..., larrywolohon@... wrote:

This is getting off topic but the early 1947 Fords were identical to the 1946's. This is per my copy of the 1941 - 48 Fords put out by the Early Ford V-8 Club. So these Ford are either 1946's or very early 1947's. The 1947's were a transitional year. The early 1947's were identical to the 1946's then they got the round parking lights under the headlights from trucks probably as a cost reduction, with no hood ornament. The last 1947's received hood ornaments like the 1948 Fords.

Larry Wolohon/owner of 1941 & 1948 Fords
----- Original Message -----
From: Rhbale@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, April 2, 2011 9:22:43 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Auto Haulers






You are looking at 1946 Fords. The rectangular parking lights inboard of
the headlights were the same in 1942 and 1946. As Richard Hendrickson has
pointed out, the 1947 Fords were virtually identical, except that the parking
lights became round and smaller, and were positioned just below the
headlights. The two short chrome strips on the trunk were also new for 1946 but I
don't know with certainty if they were continued in '47.

Richard Bale
( http://www.mrhmag.comIn a message dated 4/2/2011 11:31:55 A.M. Pacific
Daylight Time, rhendrickson@... writes: On Apr 2, 2011, at 7:00 AM,
Mark M wrote:> Found an interesting photo of a car hauler in the background
is a > host of freight cars.>> )

In a message dated 4/2/2011 11:31:55 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
rhendrickson@... writes:

On Apr 2, 2011, at 7:00 AM, Mark M wrote:

Found an interesting photo of a car hauler in the background is a
host of freight cars.

_ http://www.flickr.com/photos/brimen/5054484296/in/_
( http://www.flickr.com/photos/brimen/5054484296/in/ ) _
set-72157625100884778/lightbox/
Mark, just for the record, those are postwar Fords, probably '46
models or maybe the nearly identical '47s.

Richard Hendrickson

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

_ ( http://www.model-railroad-hobbyist.com/ )








Re: Intermountain SP T&NO B-50-26 roof

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
I have two of Ted's kits and along with the correct roofs (which were extra) there are additional doors which have the wide seem.
Am I missing something with the doors?
They permit you to do the 1946 orders of B-50-25. They do not apply to B-50-26.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Intermountain SP T&NO B-50-26 roof

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I have two of Ted's kits and along with the correct roofs (which were
extra) there are additional doors which have the wide seem.
Am I missing something with the doors?

Bill Pardie
On Mar 31, 2011, at 1:55 PM, cobrapsl@... wrote:


Mike,

The SP and the T&NO B-50-26's had straight panel roofs and metal
running boards. The running board manufacturers varied depending on
the builder and car series number. The real problem with the
Intermountain kit is that the end is really not correct ( I will get
some flak here) and that is why Culotta did his SP B-50-25 kit. One
of these kits with one of the Southwest (Dan Hall) Superior, or
interm Youngstown doors, is the most accurate way to get a B-50-26.
Then as has been ststed on this list, it will not be "dead on"
accurate as the IM kit is based on a Great Northern car.

Paul Lyons

-----Original Message-----
From: mike brock <brockm@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thu, Mar 31, 2011 3:10 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Intermountain SP T&NO B-50-26 roof

The subject of this message has probably been discussed many times.
Fine.
It's going to be discussed again. Remember, I'm the only one at this
party
with a gun<G>.

OK. For Tony Thompson...although others are welcome to chime in. The
SP 12
panel B-50-26 box car. Intermountain has produced both the SP and T&NO
versions. The SP version has a panel roof and wood running board.
The T&NO
version has a diagonal roof and metal running board [ at least mine
does ].

Tony's excellent book on SP box cars, Vol 4 of his SP Freight Cars,
notes on
pg 303 that the B-50-27 had the first digonal roofs [presumably of
the 40 ft
SP box cars ]. Futhermore, Table 12-2 on pg 283 indicates a panel
roof. Do
we have a problem?

Mike Brock

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


automobile car & other identification

Robert kirkham
 

I've posted some additional zoomed in shots of specific cars that appear in the yard photo I posted last week with the hope that some may be able to assist a little more with identification. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/files/Vancouver%20late%20war%20yard%20/

I am thinking the car in image #93 is a 50' Missouri Pacific composite automobile car - based on what little I can make of the herald. I wonder whether what can be seen in the photo is enough to confirm it is a MP car? And wondering about modelling options as well. These shots are thought to be taken either late WWII of early postwar.

Photo #151 shows a steel automobile car with steel running boards. The image is taken from the edge of the photo so part of the car is not shown. The markings are so spartan I was hoping that alone might assist identifying the owner and car type.

Photo 59 shows a composite boxcar with a) a large circular herald near the right end and b) what appears to be lengthy reporting marks left of the door. Is that enough to seriously narrow down the possible owners? I'm wondering whether it could be Seaboard or Southern?

I recognise that all of these are poor quality images - they are scanned at 2400 dpi from the original print.

Thanks in advance for any further help.

Rob Kirkham


Re: Walthers 30' wood caboose with offset cupola

Tim O'Connor
 

Bob

Walthers produced a CA-1 a number of years ago. I don't recall
exactly when it came out.

Tim O'Connor

One or two of you may be wondering, "Why does Jeff care about a GTW
caboose?" The answer is that Walthers is planning to also do a UP CA-1,
and I want a preview of what kind of job they will do.
Bob Witt


Re: Walthers 30' wood caboose with offset cupola

rwitt_2000
 

Bob Weston wrote:

Hi Guys!
Am I correct in assuming this model is based on a Haskell and Barker
design? Have any drawings of this caboose ever been published in the
model or prototype press? Prototype photos of similar cabooses show them
with truss rods. Any info greatly appreciated.

Here is an old post from 2002 by Jeff Aley. A different search of the
archives may produce others. The best information did imply it was based
on a GTW prototype.

Walthers HO Caboose Message #6463
<../../../../messages/6463?o=1&xm=1&l=1>
<../../../../post?act=reply&messageNum=6463>
<../../../../message/6462> < Next >
</group/STMFC/message/6464?var=1&l=1>
Walthers has announced a GTW caboose (see
http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/932-7501
<http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/932-7501> ).

Has anyone seen a pre-production sample of these? How are they?

One or two of you may be wondering, "Why does Jeff care about a GTW
caboose?" The answer is that Walthers is planning to also do a UP CA-1,
and I want a preview of what kind of job they will do.


Bob Witt


Re: Blue Coal reference

O Fenton Wells
 

Good catch, as I have XM in my car and my work area and hear the Blue Coal
ads as well on Old Time Radio shows on XM.
Fenton

On Sun, Apr 3, 2011 at 1:37 PM, Brian <cornbeltroute@...> wrote:



Not long ago, a thread here discussed the coloring of coal used for
marketing, some decades ago. A few days ago, reading the book, "Everyday
Life from Prohibition through World War II" (Marc McCutcheon), I came across
this 1938 Mutual network excerpt from the radio crime program The Shadow:

----------

. . . opening announcement, The Shadow: "Who knows what evil lurks in the
hearts of men? The Shadow knows! [laughs]" Announcer: "Again, Blue Coal
dealers present radio's strangest adventurer, the Shadow, mystery man who
strikes terror into the very hearts of lawbreakers and criminals. . . .
Today, Blue Coal brings you the Shadow's greatest adventure, 'The Silent
Avenger.' . . .

The Shadow's exciting adventure begins in just a moment, but first, I'd
like to remind you homeowners that right now, when Winter is changing into
Spring, is the most treacherous time of all the year. But you can protect
your family's health and save valuable dollars by burning Blue Coal. It's
Pennsylvania's finest anthracite. Order a trial ton from your nearest Blue
Coal dealer tomorrow.

----------

Thought some here might get a kick from this passage from the past.

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa




--
Fenton Wells
3047 Creek Run
Sanford NC 27332
919-499-5545
srrfan1401@...


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Blue Coal reference

Brian <cornbeltroute@...>
 

Not long ago, a thread here discussed the coloring of coal used for marketing, some decades ago. A few days ago, reading the book, "Everyday Life from Prohibition through World War II" (Marc McCutcheon), I came across this 1938 Mutual network excerpt from the radio crime program The Shadow:

----------

. . . opening announcement, The Shadow: "Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? The Shadow knows! [laughs]" Announcer: "Again, Blue Coal dealers present radio's strangest adventurer, the Shadow, mystery man who strikes terror into the very hearts of lawbreakers and criminals. . . . Today, Blue Coal brings you the Shadow's greatest adventure, 'The Silent Avenger.' . . .

The Shadow's exciting adventure begins in just a moment, but first, I'd like to remind you homeowners that right now, when Winter is changing into Spring, is the most treacherous time of all the year. But you can protect your family's health and save valuable dollars by burning Blue Coal. It's Pennsylvania's finest anthracite. Order a trial ton from your nearest Blue Coal dealer tomorrow.

----------

Thought some here might get a kick from this passage from the past.

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Re: Baltimore and Ohio hopper cars...

Benjamin Hom
 

I wrote:
"As Rich Orr suggested, see my article in the May/June 2009 issue of The B&O
Modeler for more information on the B&O hopper fleet."

Trying to multitask too much at 0600 - correct issue is May/June *2006*. 
Apologies for any confusion.


Ben Hom


Re: Murphy

water.kresse@...
 

I believe we are talking about Peter Murphy the 1930s and later?



Advanced Goodle Patent Search under inventor?



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rupert & Maureen" <gamlenz@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, April 2, 2011 11:18:12 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re:Murphy

About a month ago, there was a posting from Tony Thompson about "Murphy" with the comment -

As far as Richard Hendrickson and I have ever been able to determine, the term (Murphy) refers back to an invention of interlocking
metal parts which made the combination water-tight, or approximately so. Thus the term could be applied to any component which
employed that arrangement. One supposes that "Murphy" refers to the inventor, rather than to the well- known "Murphy's Law."

I've found a piece in the Railway Mechanical Engineer of 1916 referring to Charles Murphy, CB&Q's tin shop foreman at Aurora, who
had devised a new roof using steel sheets taken from the roofs of destroyed cars.  The article gave a description of how the roof
was constructed consisting of five parts: the roof sheets, transverse and center cover caps, eave flashings and the roof clips, with
crimped edges to interlock the pieces.

    The article comments that the roof was simple in construction, easy to make, flexible and waterproof.  It permitted a large
amount of wearing of the car without straining the sheets nor opening up holes for water to leak through.  There were no sharp
corners nor crevices to collect dirt and hold moisture.  Air could circulate freely to all parts of the sheets,  keeping them in a
dry state, and the sizes of the roof sheets and center cover caps were selected so that old roof sheets could be cut down, recrimped
and re-used.

Whether this is THE Murphy, I've no idea but if anyone wants a copy of the full article, contact me off list.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ


Walthers 30' wood caboose with offset cupola

Bob Weston
 

Hi Guys!
Am I correct in assuming this model is based on a Haskell and Barker design? Have any drawings of this caboose ever been published in the model or prototype press? Prototype photos of similar cabooses show them with truss rods. Any info greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Bob Weston


Re: Baltimore and Ohio hopper cars...

Benjamin Hom
 

Steve Lucas asked:
"I've been told on this list that B&O hopper cars had Duryea draft gear. What
online photos I can find confirm this, except for this car painted up as B&O
829839 on the Conway Scenic at North Conway, NH--

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=2176474

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=2190867

This car appears to have conventional draft gear.

Was this a B&O car, or is it a 12" = 1' reproduction using another road's car?"

Later classes of B&O offset hopper cars (N-41, N-44 twins; W-8, W-9 triples) did
not have Duryea cushion underframes.  However, in the case of this car, the car
number appears to be bogus as it doesn't fall inside any pre-1964 B&O hopper
number series.  The closest number series is 829300-829783, Class N-41a, 484
ex-LNE cars acquired in 1963.

As Rich Orr suggested, see my article in the May/June 2009 issue of The B&O
Modeler for more information on the B&O hopper fleet.


Ben Hom


Re: Baltimore and Ohio hopper cars...

SUVCWORR@...
 

See Ben Hom's article in the B&O Modeler Vol 2 No 3 May'June 2006 available from the B&O Historical Society on CD.

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sun, Apr 3, 2011 12:59 am
Subject: [STMFC] Baltimore and Ohio hopper cars...


I've been told on this list that B&O hopper cars had Duryea draft gear. What
online photos I can find confirm this, except for this car painted up as B&O
829839 on the Conway Scenic at North Conway, NH--

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=2176474

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=2190867

This car appears to have conventional draft gear.

Was this a B&O car, or is it a 12" = 1' reproduction using another road's car?

Steve Lucas.







------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Baltimore and Ohio hopper cars...

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I've been told on this list that B&O hopper cars had Duryea draft gear. What online photos I can find confirm this, except for this car painted up as B&O 829839 on the Conway Scenic at North Conway, NH--

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=2176474

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=2190867

This car appears to have conventional draft gear.

Was this a B&O car, or is it a 12" = 1' reproduction using another road's car?

Steve Lucas.


Re: Auto Haulers

Larry Wolohon
 

This is getting off topic but the early 1947 Fords were identical to the 1946's. This is per my copy of the 1941 - 48 Fords put out by the Early Ford V-8 Club. So these Ford are either 1946's or very early 1947's. The 1947's were a transitional year. The early 1947's were identical to the 1946's then they got the round parking lights under the headlights from trucks probably as a cost reduction, with no hood ornament. The last 1947's received hood ornaments like the 1948 Fords.

Larry Wolohon/owner of 1941 & 1948 Fords

----- Original Message -----
From: Rhbale@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, April 2, 2011 9:22:43 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Auto Haulers






You are looking at 1946 Fords. The rectangular parking lights inboard of
the headlights were the same in 1942 and 1946. As Richard Hendrickson has
pointed out, the 1947 Fords were virtually identical, except that the parking
lights became round and smaller, and were positioned just below the
headlights. The two short chrome strips on the trunk were also new for 1946 but I
don't know with certainty if they were continued in '47.

Richard Bale
( http://www.mrhmag.comIn a message dated 4/2/2011 11:31:55 A.M. Pacific
Daylight Time, rhendrickson@... writes: On Apr 2, 2011, at 7:00 AM,
Mark M wrote:> Found an interesting photo of a car hauler in the background
is a > host of freight cars.>> )

In a message dated 4/2/2011 11:31:55 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
rhendrickson@... writes:

On Apr 2, 2011, at 7:00 AM, Mark M wrote:

Found an interesting photo of a car hauler in the background is a
host of freight cars.

_ http://www.flickr.com/photos/brimen/5054484296/in/_
( http://www.flickr.com/photos/brimen/5054484296/in/ ) _
set-72157625100884778/lightbox/
Mark, just for the record, those are postwar Fords, probably '46
models or maybe the nearly identical '47s.

Richard Hendrickson

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

_ ( http://www.model-railroad-hobbyist.com/ )


Re: Steam era freight yards, take II

Jim Pickett
 

I hurriedly stitched them together for you. Forgive me for the liberty.

 
Jim Pickett







Tom Madden wrote: On Veterans Day 1960 I took a series of three shots of
the PRR Phillipsburg facilities from across the river just south of
Easton. A couple of years ago I assembled them into a panoramic view of
questionable quality - at least, as best as I could. When taking the
photos I neglected to overlap the left and center ones:

http://www.pullmanproject.com/Phillipsburg.jpg



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Murphy

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

About a month ago, there was a posting from Tony Thompson about "Murphy" with the comment -

As far as Richard Hendrickson and I have ever been able to determine, the term (Murphy) refers back to an invention of interlocking metal parts which made the combination water-tight, or approximately so. Thus the term could be applied to any component which employed that arrangement. One supposes that "Murphy" refers to the inventor, rather than to the well- known "Murphy's Law."

I've found a piece in the Railway Mechanical Engineer of 1916 referring to Charles Murphy, CB&Q's tin shop foreman at Aurora, who had devised a new roof using steel sheets taken from the roofs of destroyed cars. The article gave a description of how the roof was constructed consisting of five parts: the roof sheets, transverse and center cover caps, eave flashings and the roof clips, with crimped edges to interlock the pieces.

The article comments that the roof was simple in construction, easy to make, flexible and waterproof. It permitted a large amount of wearing of the car without straining the sheets nor opening up holes for water to leak through. There were no sharp corners nor crevices to collect dirt and hold moisture. Air could circulate freely to all parts of the sheets, keeping them in a dry state, and the sizes of the roof sheets and center cover caps were selected so that old roof sheets could be cut down, recrimped and re-used.

Whether this is THE Murphy, I've no idea but if anyone wants a copy of the full article, contact me off list.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ


Re: The B&O Modeler - March/April 2011

bdg1210 <Bruce_Griffin@...>
 

Group,

For full disclosure, the back issues are in the works and we were working to get caught up before now, but ran out of time. Bob's article, while not strictly prototypical, was so good, I could not hold it any longer. I had it last April, but could not get it published in time. I love the creativity and the great modeling.

Bill,

If you want more info and photos for the M-15-l or m, contact me directly and I can send some prototype and model photos (I have built about 10 of the F&C kits but have not had time to write it up). We would really appreciate you writing it up for us. The lack of prototype modeling articles is because we don't get enough of them. If anyone is willing to model and write, we are willing to assist with the research. The B&O HS Archives is always willing to help authors (non-memberrs included) with their work, just ask and give credit in your writing.

Regards,
Bruce Griffin
Summerfield, NC

--- In STMFC@..., bill davis <billcheri72@...> wrote:

Hi All,
After looking at the Mar Apr issue. The hopper looks like something to add to my project list.I like the early boxcar M-15 class wagon top cars too but most articles are about the M-53 class. I have the RPC on the wagon top cars.
BILL

--- On Sat, 4/2/11, moonmuln <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote:

From: moonmuln <jack.f.mullen@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: The B&O Modeler - March/April 2011
To: STMFC@...
Date: Saturday, April 2, 2011, 10:47 AM







 









Ben, Bob Chapman, and all involved with B&O Modeler,



Thanks for your efforts producing this truly First class publication.



The timeliness of the material is evident.



Jack



--- In STMFC@..., Benjamin Hom <b.hom@> wrote:

Bill Davis asked:
"Just out of curiosity what happened to vol 7 #1??
did I miss it or was it skipped?"
Bill, the September/October 2010, November/December 2010, and January/February
2011 issues are still forthcoming and are in development.  We decided to publish
the latest issue under the March/April 2011 cover date based on the material
presented in the lead article.  Enjoy!
Ben Hom
Associate Editor, The B&O Modeler
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Auto Haulers

Richard Bale
 

You are looking at 1946 Fords. The rectangular parking lights inboard of
the headlights were the same in 1942 and 1946. As Richard Hendrickson has
pointed out, the 1947 Fords were virtually identical, except that the parking
lights became round and smaller, and were positioned just below the
headlights. The two short chrome strips on the trunk were also new for 1946 but I
don't know with certainty if they were continued in '47.

Richard Bale
(http://www.mrhmag.comIn a message dated 4/2/2011 11:31:55 A.M. Pacific
Daylight Time, rhendrickson@... writes: On Apr 2, 2011, at 7:00 AM,
Mark M wrote:> Found an interesting photo of a car hauler in the background
is a > host of freight cars.>> )

In a message dated 4/2/2011 11:31:55 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
rhendrickson@... writes:




On Apr 2, 2011, at 7:00 AM, Mark M wrote:

Found an interesting photo of a car hauler in the background is a
host of freight cars.





_http://www.flickr.com/photos/brimen/5054484296/in/_
(http://www.flickr.com/photos/brimen/5054484296/in/) _
set-72157625100884778/lightbox/
Mark, just for the record, those are postwar Fords, probably '46
models or maybe the nearly identical '47s.

Richard Hendrickson

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

_ (http://www.model-railroad-hobbyist.com/)


Re: Intermountain SP T&NO B-50-26 roof

WaltGCox@...
 

Thanks Jim & Ed, I found the doors I was looking for using your link. Walt

In a message dated 3/31/2011 10:23:50 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
hawk0621@... writes:





On Mar 31, 2011, at 8:48 PM, _WaltGCox@... (mailto:WaltGCox@...)
wrote:

I am looking for some wide seam doors and tried to Google" Southwest
models" but the closest hit was for a 737 wrapped in a decal of a
(female)
model. Would anyone have their website or more of the company name?
Walt,
Southwest Scale Productions at _http://www.southwestscale.com/_
(http://www.southwestscale.com/)
Ed Hawkins

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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