Date   

Re: G-26 Mill Gondola

jerryglow2
 

OTOH there's little reason NOT to do it as PRR as the cars were well traveled and PRR did serve major industrial areas. Remember, in our era, everyone is a PRR modeler <g>

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Bryan Busséy <bbussey@...> wrote:

The G26 is a definitive design unique to the Pennsylvania Railroad.
That said, I don't think anything should deter you from lettering the
model for Milwaukee Road if you wish to.

bb

On 5/5/2011 12:56 PM, gpnrr wrote:

I'm am the owner of a brass G-26 mill gondola imported by Pennsy S
Models. The car is nicely painted while proper decals were provided
later.

Since I'm a Milwaukee Road fan, I was wondering about lettering the
car for the Milwaukee's own 93500 to 93534 series of gons. Off hand I
see some differences in the vertical ribs, requiring major and
unwelcome surgery. The only photo I have is one published in
"Milwaukee Road Color Guide" by Dough Nighswonger, which shows a side
view. Is anyone aware of any other major differences between the two
cars that would further detract me from lettering this car for the
Milwaukee Road.

Many thanks,

Bob Werre
BobWphoto.com


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Modelling welded seams on boxcars...

O Fenton Wells
 

Use Archer weld seams, they work.
fenton

On Thu, May 5, 2011 at 3:56 PM, Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...> wrote:



I have an undec Branchline kit for a 40`, 10`-6`i.h., ten-panel
rivetted-seam boxcar. I want to model a GTW 515500-515999 series AC&F-built
12-panel welded seam car using it and RailCad decals (prototype photo bottom
of page 100 RMJ Boxcars, Book 1).

Any suggestions as how best to model the welded side sheet seams on this
car? I've thought of simply scribing them into the styrene, but maybe Archer
welded seam decals might look better?

Thanks in advance,

Steve Lucas.




--
Fenton Wells
3047 Creek Run
Sanford NC 27332
919-499-5545
srrfan1401@...


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Modelling welded seams on boxcars...

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I have an undec Branchline kit for a 40`, 10`-6`i.h., ten-panel rivetted-seam boxcar. I want to model a GTW 515500-515999 series AC&F-built 12-panel welded seam car using it and RailCad decals (prototype photo bottom of page 100 RMJ Boxcars, Book 1).

Any suggestions as how best to model the welded side sheet seams on this car? I've thought of simply scribing them into the styrene, but maybe Archer welded seam decals might look better?

Thanks in advance,

Steve Lucas.


Re: G-26 Mill Gondola

Bryan Busséy
 

The G26 is a definitive design unique to the Pennsylvania Railroad.
That said, I don't think anything should deter you from lettering the
model for Milwaukee Road if you wish to.

bb

On 5/5/2011 12:56 PM, gpnrr wrote:

I'm am the owner of a brass G-26 mill gondola imported by Pennsy S
Models. The car is nicely painted while proper decals were provided
later.

Since I'm a Milwaukee Road fan, I was wondering about lettering the
car for the Milwaukee's own 93500 to 93534 series of gons. Off hand I
see some differences in the vertical ribs, requiring major and
unwelcome surgery. The only photo I have is one published in
"Milwaukee Road Color Guide" by Dough Nighswonger, which shows a side
view. Is anyone aware of any other major differences between the two
cars that would further detract me from lettering this car for the
Milwaukee Road.

Many thanks,

Bob Werre
BobWphoto.com


HO Decals

George <g.corral@...>
 

HI everyone,



First, I just joined this group so I want to say hello and I hope someone
can help me out.



Next, I want to say that I model the SP in the early 50s. I want to be as
accurate as I can but I don't have much experience which leads me to my
question.



I'm looking for decals for 3 undecorated Detail Associates GS gondolas
(might be G-50-22/23) that I want to build as SP cars. Unfortunately, I
can't seem to locate any. The closest I can come to decals for these type
gondolas is the Microscale 87-1314 set but these are for composite beet
rack gondolas. Will these work (whole or in part) or could I use them in
conjunction with other decals?



Who makes decals for these gondolas or will I have to have custom decals
made? I really need a copy of Tony Thompson's SP Freight Cars vol. 1 for me
to see what I'm talking about.



Any suggestions/leads would be most appreciated.



George

g.corral@...



Life is too short; Break the rules, Forgive quickly, Kiss slowly, Love
truly, Laugh uncontrollably, and Never regret anything that made you smile!


G-26 Mill Gondola

Bob Werre
 

I'm am the owner of a brass G-26 mill gondola imported by Pennsy S Models. The car is nicely painted while proper decals were provided later.

Since I'm a Milwaukee Road fan, I was wondering about lettering the car for the Milwaukee's own 93500 to 93534 series of gons. Off hand I see some differences in the vertical ribs, requiring major and unwelcome surgery. The only photo I have is one published in "Milwaukee Road Color Guide" by Dough Nighswonger, which shows a side view. Is anyone aware of any other major differences between the two cars that would further detract me from lettering this car for the Milwaukee Road.

Many thanks,

Bob Werre
BobWphoto.com


Re: The Chopper

Andy Harman
 

On Fri, 6 May 2011 00:49:37 +1000, North Model Railroad Supplies wrote
I find if you hold the work firmly against a stop when you lower the lever,
the blade will cut straight.

This assumes the cut is between your finger and the stop, so the work can't
creep one way or the other when the blade slices into it.
I'll concede that with enough effort it's possible to make a clean cut with the
fiber-board base chopper, but some better design would make it much more reliable. I'm
really surprised nobody has come out with a better tool. The fiberboard also has a
tendency to get chewed up after only a few cuts, which greatly impacts the accuracy and
cleanliness of future cuts. On my Chopper III, the blade didn't even come down square
on the board - and I'm not sure if this was just due to misalignment or warping of the
board.

I bought a Chopper II some years later, aluminum base but the cutting surface is a
plastic cutting mat. It also can get chewed up from usage and needs to be replaced
periodically but even the II has some lateral wobble in the blade arm. If I bought a
power miter saw with that much play in it, I'd return it. My Chopper II also came with
crummy plastic thumbnuts to hold the clamps down, which strip easily and are too squishy
to really get a firm hold.

Styrene is my favorite material to work with, but it is soft and often pliable, and when
trying to make square cuts it frequently has a mind of its own. IMO the thinner it is,
the harder it is to make a really clean, straight linear cut. .020 or .030 or thicker
you can score a line, break, and then dress the edge. Can't do that with .010 or .005,
you have to make the cut in one pass and it has to be perfect.

At any rate on the subject, has anybody tried the Micro Mark chopper? If it's a virtual
copy of NWSL's then it at least has the virtue of being cheaper (i.e. priced closer to
what it's really worth), but if it's an improvement in the design or material, it might
be worth looking into. My other option is to just take my Chopper II and make some new
parts for it, like all metal thumbnuts and holddown clamps, and something to reinforce
the blade arm. But the reality is I don't use it all that much anyway, the other
methods I use for cutting styrene are more reliable and less frustrating.

Andy


Re: The Chopper

Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Permit me to toot my own horn on the subject. As far as I know I was the first to describe the Chopper in my first published article in MR in 1965. I was in The Model Railroad Shop, picked up the new issue and there I was. What a pleasant surprise. I hadn't received the check from MR yet. - Al Westerfield


Re: Oh NO... MicroMark at it again!

cj riley <cjriley42@...>
 

I once worked for a man that had a truly original way of manufacturing logs for homes. He patented the ides and then spent a major portion of his work day defending the patents and applying for them in other countries. It consumed him. There has to be a high value in the product to justify that time and expense.

CJ Riley

Bainbridge Island WA

--- On Wed, 5/4/11, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:






 











But you CAN patent an idea, even a simple one. Depositing material

on decal film to represent rivets -- might be patentable. Far less

original ideas have been granted patents.















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: The Chopper

North Model Railroad Supplies <nmrs@...>
 

I find if you hold the work firmly against a stop when you lower the lever,
the blade will cut straight.

This assumes the cut is between your finger and the stop, so the work can't
creep one way or the other when the blade slices into it.

If you are cutting with either end able to move away from the blade (either
no stop, or minimal holding tension with your finger) the blade tends to
slide in the direction that the work can move away.

(I hope that makes sense)

My chopper has supports on both sides of the lever, so no tilting of the
lever occurs.

I feel this may have been a contributing factor with the original Chopper.

Just my 10c worth.

Cheers

Dave North


Rivet Decals, was Re: Oh NO... MicroMark at it again!

nvrr49 <nvrr49@...>
 

I do not know the process that either Archer or MicroMark uses, but this type of technology has been avaialable for many years. A company I sell for has been using "exploding" ink for at least a decade to create "raised grain" on paper applied to plywood paneling. It is very controllable and makes the "grain" exactly where they want it. If it was patentable, the patent has run out a long time ago. I am just relaying what was explained to me by the manufacturer. Not a printer, so if there is a printer in the house, maybe they could shed some light on this. Although we may be leaving the relm of Steam Era Freight Cars.

Kent in KC


Re: Oh NO... MicroMark at it again!

nvrr49 <nvrr49@...>
 

What MicroMark is doing is also the Walmart way. Buy it cheaper off shore. So if you not going to buy from MicroMark you need to stop shopping at Walmart.

Kent in KC

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


But you CAN patent an idea, even a simple one. Depositing material
on decal film to represent rivets -- might be patentable. Far less
original ideas have been granted patents. (For example, Verizon
-patented- the idea of using a phone number to look up an internet
address. Nevermind that this was totally unoriginal -- they got the
patent and used it to sue Vonage and other competitors.)

Tim O'Connor


What would they copyright? The rivet spacing? You can't
copyright an idea.

Tony Thompson


Re: Livestock in closed cars?

Jeffrey White
 

Because the illustrations are under the heading of "livestock". It's
rule H-59. " Livestock should have plenty of air, and if in closed cars
during warm weather, they should be placed adjacent to doorways and
doors cleated open for ventilation. See illustrations Nos. 65 and 66."

Those are the illustrations I mentioned 65 is for wood door cars and 66
for steel door cars.

Jeff White
Alma, IL

On 5/5/2011 7:33 AM, Douglas Harding wrote:

What makes you think blocking the car doors open was for transport of
livestock? Do the rules specifically state anything about livestock? While
we can document specific or unusual shipment of livestock in boxcars
(I too
have the photo's Ray mentioned), I suspect this rules were to accommodate
those loads that typically were shipped in ventilated boxcars, ie
watermelons. The IC served portions of the south. Many southern railroads
had ventilated boxcars. These rules may have been a way to compete when a
ventilated boxcar was requested and the IC could not provide it.

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org




Re: Livestock in closed cars?

Ray Breyer
 

What makes you think blocking the car doors open was for
transport of livestock? Do the rules specifically state
anything about livestock? While we can document specific
or unusual shipment of livestock in boxcars, I suspect
this rules were to accommodate those loads that typically
were shipped in ventilated boxcars, ie watermelons. The IC
served portions of the south. Many southern railroads had
ventilated boxcars. These rules may have been a way to
compete when a ventilated boxcar was requested and the IC
could not provide it.
Doug Harding

I sort of doubt this Doug. The IC made a deliberate decision to eliminate ventilated cars from their roster by 1933 (going from 1120 of this type of car in 1911 to zero in 1933). Any ventilated traffic they might have generated could easily have been transported in one of their stock cars. And since the IC served most of the "hog belt" (Iowa and IL) that stock traffic was FAR more important, so I can see plain boxcars being used for this traffic over occasional loadings of melons.

Most of the photos I have of the IC's South Water Street terminal in Chicago show LOTS of deep south ventilated cars, but no IC ventilated cars after 1910 or so. The couple of good IC VM photos that I have (pulled off LoC downloads) were taken in 1903, and show cars that were also equipped with heaters.

Regards,
Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


Re: Livestock in closed cars?

Douglas Harding
 

What makes you think blocking the car doors open was for transport of
livestock? Do the rules specifically state anything about livestock? While
we can document specific or unusual shipment of livestock in boxcars (I too
have the photo's Ray mentioned), I suspect this rules were to accommodate
those loads that typically were shipped in ventilated boxcars, ie
watermelons. The IC served portions of the south. Many southern railroads
had ventilated boxcars. These rules may have been a way to compete when a
ventilated boxcar was requested and the IC could not provide it.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: The Chopper

John Degnan <scaler187@...>
 

To stabilize the blade, the same method could be incorporated on a quality "Chopper" as that used on a printer's paper cutter - the blade is laminated between two sheets of steel that travel with the blade in the cutting step and also act as a 'press' that holds in place whatever is being cut. Once these steel sheets contact whatever is being cut, they stop their descent, but the blade (still prevented from flexing by the steel sheets) continues down to make the cut.


John Degnan
Scaler187@...

----- Original Message -----
From: lnbill
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, May 05, 2011 05:01 AM
Subject: [STMFC] The Chopper



The single edge razor blade should also be stabilized somehow also to prevent it from flexing.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., Andy Harman <gsgondola@...> wrote:
>
> At 03:24 PM 5/4/2011 -0700, you wrote:
> >to more American dollars being spent on foreign products. The NWSL Chopper
> >is made in America...the one MM sells is made, best guess, in China.
>
> Wherever it's made it can't be any worse than the Chopper. It's a piece of
> junk. Or at least the Chopper 1 and Chopper 3 are. The 2 is almost usable
> having an aluminum base. All are great ideas, but sloppily built and in
> the case of the 1 and the 3, very poor choice of materials. Way too much
> play in the cutting arm to get precise cuts, I can do better with a
> straightedge and a #11.
>
> No great love for MM, but if their chopper is better built, I'd try
> it. Never have seen it though. A precision guillotine type cutter where
> the blade comes straight down would be a very handy tool, without the pull
> distortion you get with a swiveling chopper if you cut anything more than
> about .050" wide.


The Chopper

Bill Welch
 

The single edge razor blade should also be stabilized somehow also to prevent it from flexing.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., Andy Harman <gsgondola@...> wrote:

At 03:24 PM 5/4/2011 -0700, you wrote:
to more American dollars being spent on foreign products. The NWSL Chopper
is made in America...the one MM sells is made, best guess, in China.
Wherever it's made it can't be any worse than the Chopper. It's a piece of
junk. Or at least the Chopper 1 and Chopper 3 are. The 2 is almost usable
having an aluminum base. All are great ideas, but sloppily built and in
the case of the 1 and the 3, very poor choice of materials. Way too much
play in the cutting arm to get precise cuts, I can do better with a
straightedge and a #11.

No great love for MM, but if their chopper is better built, I'd try
it. Never have seen it though. A precision guillotine type cutter where
the blade comes straight down would be a very handy tool, without the pull
distortion you get with a swiveling chopper if you cut anything more than
about .050" wide.

Andy


Re: Hub City Museum rolling stock - photos

Tim O'Connor
 

Thanks Clark, I will. I'd forgotten about your E-zine article (Vol #2, issue #2)

Tim

Tim, I did a piece on modeling these cars for the CNWHS Emag. Check it out from their website.
Clark Propst


Re: Overland UTLX Tank Car

Tim O'Connor
 

John,

Mine is a 10,000 gallon car. Says so on the label, too.

I converted mine to AB brakes. Does yours have KC brakes?

Tim O'Connor

I have one of the old HO Overland UTLX tank cars, 8,000-gal
version. Is this an X-3?

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL
Yes, it's a late X-3 (ca. 1930) with the wrong trucks (if it still
has its original Andrews trucks). By 1930, the X-3s were getting
AAR cast steel trucks with spring planks. I think I have a photo if
it would be helpful.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Oh NO... MicroMark at it again!

Tim O'Connor
 

But you CAN patent an idea, even a simple one. Depositing material
on decal film to represent rivets -- might be patentable. Far less
original ideas have been granted patents. (For example, Verizon
-patented- the idea of using a phone number to look up an internet
address. Nevermind that this was totally unoriginal -- they got the
patent and used it to sue Vonage and other competitors.)

Tim O'Connor

What would they copyright? The rivet spacing? You can't
copyright an idea.

Tony Thompson

97441 - 97460 of 196997