Date   

Re: RPM Etiquette

spsalso
 

--- In STMFC@..., "soolinehistory" <destorzek@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@..., "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@> wrote:

I'll stick my oar into this and just say that I'm pretty sure that the miscreant in question is a regular at Naperville and should have known better but clearly didn't give a damn.
Bit of the old entitlement attitude...
Pierre Oliver
Probably the best solution is to cover your model with a glass bell jar, and install a large hairy spider to keep it company.

That ought to solve the problem.

Dennis (just trying to be helpful) Storzek
Only if the spider can read the sign next to the model.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: RPM Etiquette

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:

I'll stick my oar into this and just say that I'm pretty sure that the miscreant in question is a regular at Naperville and should have known better but clearly didn't give a damn.
Bit of the old entitlement attitude...
Pierre Oliver
Probably the best solution is to cover your model with a glass bell jar, and install a large hairy spider to keep it company.

That ought to solve the problem.

Dennis (just trying to be helpful) Storzek


Re: RPM Etiquette

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

I'll stick my oar into this and just say that I'm pretty sure that the miscreant in question is a regular at Naperville and should have known better but clearly didn't give a damn.
Bit of the old entitlement attitude...
Pierre Oliver



Let me offer up the quaint thought that, as far as meets like this are concerned, maybe bigger isn't always better??? This sort of get-together always starts out with just the hardcore type modelers and, as the attendance over the years expands to include the less knowledgeable, these sorts of problems begin to crop up. Sometimes the whole event starts to shrivel up because the hardcore types get tired of putting their (models, street rods, wood carvings, whatever) at risk and go off somewhere else and meet amongst themselves.
And the cycle starts over......

Ken Olson


Re: Pickle Cars

nvrr49 <nvrr49@...>
 

Model Railroader November 1956 has one. I have a scan of the article if anyone would like it, just drop me an email off group and I will send it to you.

Kent in KC

--- In STMFC@..., raildata@... wrote:

There was an article in Model Railroader about 25 years ago that described a
pickle loading facility. Also talked about the industry.

Chuck Yungkurth
Boulder CO


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: RPM Etiquette

aaejj2j
 

I agree with the idea of adding the signs. A new attendee may not realize the work that went into a model, how delicate it may be, and how important it is to the owner. I found that with my father years ago that to him they were all that $1.29 Varney except some looked better. He was careful but he just did not understand the importance and value to the owner. After I explained to him he had some understanding. I know that you expect RPM attendees to be better informed but it may not always be a lack of respect but some misunderstanding.
Tyrone Johnsen
Rockford, IL

--- In STMFC@..., "mike brock" <brockm@...> wrote:
However, the point is well taken that models should not be
handled at RPM meets...or anywhere...without permission from the owner. We
may need to add some Do Not Handle signs on the display tables at Cocoa
Beach this coming Jan.

Mike Brock


Re: UP lettering

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Nov 3, 2010, at 5:27 AM, Gerald Glow wrote:

I'm working on a UP B-50-24 using an Intermountain kit with Archer ACR
rivets and Speedwitch's excellent decal set. Since I model early 50's
the lettering will be all yellow and I noticed the "shop code" for the
location built is not on the set in yellow. Would that be something
that
would not have been restenciled upon a repaint?
Jerry, the shop code would certainly have been repainted, along with
everything else. Usually, a repainted car was reweighed and the shop
code and date indicated where and when the repainting was done. But
not always. In any case, the shop code and date would have been re-
stenciled. So the course of wisdom would be to include a variety of
shop codes and dates in your data decal set.

Here's a list of common UP shop symbols where reweighing was done:
AR = Argo (Seattle) AT = Albina Terminal (Portland), OR + CB =
Council Bluffs, IA CH = Cheyenne, WY COL = Columbus, NE DE =
Denver + GI = Grand Island, NE + GR = Green River, WY LA = Los
Angeles NP = North Platte, NE NA = Nampa, ID OG = Ogden, UT OM =
Omaha + PO = Pocatello, ID WW = Walla Walla, WA (a + indicates a
larger shop where heavy repairs and repainting was carried out).

In yellow, no dates before mid-1947.


Richard Hendrickson


Re: RPM Etiquette

ken_olson54022 <kwolson@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "tugricktug2000" <tuggernaut@...> wrote:

I would say the fact that most modern-day parents don't seem to follow this plan of action anymore would explain it (can';t stifle Junior's curiousity), but most of the guys who go to these shows are not that young LOL. So the cause is simple ignorance.

It's sad that IMHO to put the kybosh on this, the organizers of the shows will have to put up DO NOT TOUCH THE MODELS signs all over the room, preferably with graphics for those who can't read or speak English, and police it in order to stop this behavior. For every one of us who rightly understands this philosophy there is at least one other who thinks it's their God-given right to do as they please and handle everything. Maybe it's a 60s thing...if it feels good do it.

Rick Schoch
PRRT&HS #8245

Let me offer up the quaint thought that, as far as meets like this are concerned, maybe bigger isn't always better??? This sort of get-together always starts out with just the hardcore type modelers and, as the attendance over the years expands to include the less knowledgeable, these sorts of problems begin to crop up. Sometimes the whole event starts to shrivel up because the hardcore types get tired of putting their (models, street rods, wood carvings, whatever) at risk and go off somewhere else and meet amongst themselves.
And the cycle starts over......

Ken Olson


Re: Andrews Trucks Using Major Components from Archbar Trucks

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "gary laakso" <vasa0vasa@...> wrote:

"..reused the arch bar journals, springs and bolsters". The same comment was made in the Freight Car Data Sheet for the USRA DS boxcars and it added "wheels and axles" to the re-used component list for Andrews trucks.

Was this a normal for Andrews trucks to use so many major parts from archbar trucks?
That was one of the design features of the Andrews truck, the fact that it used the MCB/ARA standard bolt-on journal box. How often it was actually done would require a case by case study of railroad records.

I assume this process was continued with other truck replacements, or could there limitations?
Well, the major limitation would be that no other truck was designed to use the MCB box... Vulcan trucks has separate boxes, but required a unique attachment lug on the box. Their main advantage was that a car wheelset could be removed without doing a total dissemblly of the truck, without even removing the truck from under the car in the case of the outboard axles,

All the trucks of the era used interchangeable bearings ("brasses") and bearing wedges, the part that transferred the load from the truck to the top of the bearing. The ARA standardized the internal dimensions of the boxes cast integral with newer design sideframes to be the same as those of the older separate boxes, so bearings and wedges could be reused.

I don't think that most modelers realize that at one time truck bolsters were a separate purchase item, not tied to the sideframe design in any way, the interface dimensions again being standardized by at first MCB, later ARA. At one time there were several competing bolster designs sold for use in any truck; Simplex and Huntoon come to mind as novel fabricated designs, AC&F had their own fabricated design, and Bettendorf, among others, offered one pieces castings. If any of these were installed in older trucks, they could be directly transferable to new cast trucks. It wasn't until truck designers started playing around with the springing geometry during the thirties that specific bolsters became married to specific sideframe design, as in the Dalman two level and National B-1. With the general adoption of "ride control" trucks with spring loaded wedges built into the bolster, after market truck bolsters became a thing of the past.

Dennis


Andrews Trucks Using Major Components from Archbar Trucks

gary laakso
 

I found my stash of ancient kit instructions (misplaced for decades) that included Burlington Route Historical Society Freight Car Data Sheet for the XM-25/XM-26 single-sheathed boxcars. The data sheet notes that the Burlington when it replaced the as-delivered archbar trucks with Andrews trucks....
"..reused the arch bar journals, springs and bolsters". The same comment was made in the Freight Car Data Sheet for the USRA DS boxcars and it added "wheels and axles" to the re-used component list for Andrews trucks.

Was this a normal for Andrews trucks to use so many major parts from archbar trucks? If so, this explains much about the popularity of Andrews trucks. I assume this process was continued with other truck replacements, or could there limitations?


gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
vasa0vasa@...


Re: RPM Etiquette

VINCE PUGLIESE
 

Here is another recent take on the same subject:

http://www.network54.com/Forum/149674/message/1288760222/IPMS+handling+of+models

For those unfamiliar, IPMS is the International Plastic Modelers Society
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Plastic_Modellers'_Society) and is
somewhat akin to the NMRA for static/scale modeling.

.vp



________________________________
From: tugricktug2000 <tuggernaut@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wed, November 3, 2010 7:42:34 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re:RPM Etiquette


I would say the fact that most modern-day parents don't seem to follow this plan
of action anymore would explain it (can';t stifle Junior's curiousity), but most
of the guys who go to these shows are not that young LOL. So the cause is simple
ignorance.


It's sad that IMHO to put the kybosh on this, the organizers of the shows will
have to put up DO NOT TOUCH THE MODELS signs all over the room, preferably with
graphics for those who can't read or speak English, and police it in order to
stop this behavior. For every one of us who rightly understands this philosophy
there is at least one other who thinks it's their God-given right to do as they
please and handle everything. Maybe it's a 60s thing...if it feels good do it.

Rick Schoch
PRRT&HS #8245

--- In STMFC@..., "Rashputin" <rashputin@...> wrote:

I hate to hear this sort of thing. I've been telling my kids since they
could toddle, "look with your eyes, not with your hands".


UP lettering

jerryglow2
 

I'm working on a UP B-50-24 using an Intermountain kit with Archer ACR
rivets and Speedwitch's excellent decal set. Since I model early 50's
the lettering will be all yellow and I noticed the "shop code" for the
location built is not on the set in yellow. Would that be something that
would not have been restenciled upon a repaint?

BTW: I plan to also do a 10'6" IH can but the set is all for 10' IH cars
so am doing a supplemental set for the data only. My guy gave me a color
match for the sample I sent him so hopefully it'll match up.

They're not ready yet (need to verify a sample print) but any interest?

--
*Jerry Glow
The Villages FL
sent from a real computer - no I-anythings or any color berries*


Re: RPM Etiquette

tugricktug2000 <tuggernaut@...>
 

I would say the fact that most modern-day parents don't seem to follow this plan of action anymore would explain it (can';t stifle Junior's curiousity), but most of the guys who go to these shows are not that young LOL. So the cause is simple ignorance.

It's sad that IMHO to put the kybosh on this, the organizers of the shows will have to put up DO NOT TOUCH THE MODELS signs all over the room, preferably with graphics for those who can't read or speak English, and police it in order to stop this behavior. For every one of us who rightly understands this philosophy there is at least one other who thinks it's their God-given right to do as they please and handle everything. Maybe it's a 60s thing...if it feels good do it.

Rick Schoch
PRRT&HS #8245

--- In STMFC@..., "Rashputin" <rashputin@...> wrote:

I hate to hear this sort of thing. I've been telling my kids since they
could toddle, "look with your eyes, not with your hands".


Accurail 8500 Series Reefer

Bob C <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

Accurail has announced a forty-foot steel plug door refrigerator car. Here is the link:

http://www.accurail.com/accurail/8500.htm

From the listing of road names it appears this will be either a generic refrigerator car or perhaps a car based on a specific prototype but offered in multiple paint schemes.

Does anyone know more about this car? The previous comment on this car last July seemed a little vague.

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

8500 Series 40' Steel Plug
Door Refrigerator car $14.98
8500...Undecorated
8501...Santa Fe
8502...Burlington Route
8503...GN (WFEX)
8504...Pacific Fruit Express
8505...Great Northern (Lg. Herald)
8506...Fruit Growers Express
8507...National Car Company
8508...Burlington Northern
8509...Milwaukee Road
8510...ART-Wabash/MoPac
8594...Data Only Orange
8595...Data Only Yellow


Re: RPM Etiquette

Rashputin <rashputin@...>
 

I hate to hear this sort of thing. I've been telling my kids since they
could toddle, "look with your eyes, not with your hands". They learned to
never even pick up something in a Wal-Mart to look at without first asking
me if it was OK. It seems to me like a huge assumption to think that since
someone puts their work on display for you to admire and learn from that
it's also yours to examine in any way you wish. It should, IMHO, be a well
known fact that unless you are explicitly granted permission to handle
something fragile you should not do it.



Regards



R Hume


Re: DVD With FGEX Truss Rod Reefers being Switched

Bill Welch
 

FGEX 31183 is from a very camera shy series first built by the C&EI about 1912 that FGE purchased from C&EI's Bankruptcy Trustee at a time when FGE needed to add about 1000 cars quickly in early 1920. The C&EI had some 960+ cars which was close enough. Two of the 20 payments FGE was to make to the trustee were deferred in exchange for FGE stock ownership by the C&EI. The only good photo of one of these is in "The Postwar Freight Car Fleet" published by the NMRA.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "gary laakso" <vasa0vasa@...> wrote:

Taking a break from the 10 resin cars under construction (3 WFEX 1921 Reefers-Sunshine #34.3; 4 Great Northern truss rod boxcars by Westerfield (they are the the 12th through 15th ones i have done); and 3 CB&Q X-17/X-18 truss rod boxcars by Westerfield); I put the DVD entitled "Golden Twilight of Postwar Steam, part 2" on. Its by Green Frog.

It includes a switcher working a string of 4 reefers, including straight (as oppsed to angled) truss rod reefers FGEX 18345 and 31183 next to a non-truss rod WFEX 49098 in Evansville, IN about 1945 (the only re-pack date i could make out). The area under both cars reefer doors that should be boxcar red is so worn, the paint is gone. Its a great shot and the only DVD I know of with a scene of truss rod reefer being switched. I need to develop a dirt colored paint for the underbodies on my truss rod cars.

A L&N 36 foot ventilator boxcar that was being uncoupled from the reefer string while freshly painted, looks much worse for wear then the reefers.

The Great Northern "Safe Switching" video taken in black and white circa 1947 does feature many Great Northern and CB&Q truss rod boxcars in both train service and being switched. No truss rod reefers to be found in that video.


gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
vasa0vasa@...

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Pickle Cars

Armand Premo
 

Didn't Westerfield have a pickle car in its' line?Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: Karl Peters
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 2010 7:25 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Pickle Cars



MODEL RAILROADER had an article on building pickle cars in their "Dollar Car Projects" series, not sure what issue it was in. It was also reprinted in the book, "Easy to Build Model Railroad Freight Cars" .

Karl Peters








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Re: RPM Etiquette

Gary Roe
 

Gene,

Since you were last there, an enterprising soul has devised a way to bring
the table height up to approximately arm pit elevation. It makes for much
more enjoyable viewing, and much less back pain.

gary roe
quincy, illinois

_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 2010 7:46 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: RPM Etiquette




1. It is clear; courtesy demands one not touch the belongings of others.

2. But, does the act of putting the models on display imply, in the absence
of signs to the contrary, that the model is there to be examined? The
opinion of those in this group would be that #1 above applies in all cases.

3. Models displayed on those banquet tables are hard to see unless one is a
roof freak. That may tempt one to pick up a model. I know, see #1 above.

While it has been six years since I was last in Naperville I quit spending
much time in the display room exactly because the models are so hard to see
and I wouldn't ever pick up a model. Just my thoughts. YMMV.

Gene Green


Re: RPM Etiquette

Jim Hayes
 

Gene, the tables have risers now, raising the table top at least a foot.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com

On Tue, Nov 2, 2010 at 5:46 PM, Gene <bierglaeser@...> wrote:



1. It is clear; courtesy demands one not touch the belongings of others.

2. But, does the act of putting the models on display imply, in the absence
of signs to the contrary, that the model is there to be examined? The
opinion of those in this group would be that #1 above applies in all cases.

3. Models displayed on those banquet tables are hard to see unless one is a
roof freak. That may tempt one to pick up a model. I know, see #1 above.

While it has been six years since I was last in Naperville I quit spending
much time in the display room exactly because the models are so hard to see
and I wouldn't ever pick up a model. Just my thoughts. YMMV.

Gene Green



Re: RPM Etiquette

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

1. It is clear; courtesy demands one not touch the belongings of others.

2. But, does the act of putting the models on display imply, in the absence of signs to the contrary, that the model is there to be examined? The opinion of those in this group would be that #1 above applies in all cases.

3. Models displayed on those banquet tables are hard to see unless one is a roof freak. That may tempt one to pick up a model. I know, see #1 above.

While it has been six years since I was last in Naperville I quit spending much time in the display room exactly because the models are so hard to see and I wouldn't ever pick up a model. Just my thoughts. YMMV.

Gene Green


Re: Pickle Cars

krlpeters
 

MODEL RAILROADER had an article on building pickle cars in their "Dollar Car Projects" series, not sure what issue it was in. It was also reprinted in the book, "Easy to Build Model Railroad Freight Cars" .
 
Karl Peters

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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