Date   

USAX 10,000 gallon ACF Type 27's

John Hile
 

Hello All,

I am trying to determine what paint and lettering scheme(s) the former USQX 10,000 gallon ACF Type 27 cars (like the Intermountain kit) wore circa 1952-53 after aquiring USAX reporting marks at the start of that decade.

Did the upper portion of the tanks remain silver or were they repainted black? What was the lettering font and layout? Did these cars carry the logo seen on new black tank cars of the era - i.e. ICC103W's?

Thanks in advance,

John Hile


Re: Naperville

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Clark,

Do you think tiny magnets would work?

Kind regards,


Garth Groff

On 10/25/2010 2:04 PM, Clark and Eileen wrote:
I'll chirp in on this one. Thought it was one of the best N'villes ever!

Having evolved passed proto freight car building to proto layout building and operation I saw great clinics by proto-layout group members Jack B, Lance M and Tony K. Preaching the philosophy on that group.

Thought the O scale models with the working knuckle couples were really cool : ) Dennis Eggert is trying to figure out how to have is air hoses stay together till the cars are uncoupled. Guess it's being done in O scale...wow...And that N scale layout is second to none.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Naperville

Clark Propst
 

I'll chirp in on this one. Thought it was one of the best N'villes ever!

Having evolved passed proto freight car building to proto layout building and operation I saw great clinics by proto-layout group members Jack B, Lance M and Tony K. Preaching the philosophy on that group.

Thought the O scale models with the working knuckle couples were really cool : ) Dennis Eggert is trying to figure out how to have is air hoses stay together till the cars are uncoupled. Guess it's being done in O scale...wow...And that N scale layout is second to none.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Naperville

Tim O'Connor
 

Anyone go to the Rosemont hobby show afterwards? I was
wondering if there were many model RR vendors there. Back
in the old days at Naperville we used to go to the show on
Sunday when the MRIA was there, and it was excellent, as
good as the NMRA's annual show.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Naperville

Mark
 

Hopefully we might attend next year. Glad to hear the good news.
Mark Morgan
Sent on the Sprint® Now Network from my BlackBerry®

-----Original Message-----
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
Sender: STMFC@...
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 2010 10:28:56
To: <STMFC@...>
Reply-To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Naperville

I thought this year's Naperville meet was quite good, very much
in the tradition of the previous ones conducted by Sunshine (and yes,
Sunshine was there selling kits to the usual enthusiastic buyers).
Slightly fewer clinicians due to slightly lower early registration,
thus concerns about costs, but overall a fine meet. IMO Joe Delia did
an excellent job running it, so I'll be looking forward to future
versions of this meeting.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Naperville

seaboard_1966
 

Tony

It was nice seeing you and others there as well. I thought, as well as others I talked to, that the attendance was down significantly from last year. The vendors will pretty much all agree that sales were down as well. That is s a function of the economy and the lower attendance as well.

I thought Joe and his team did a good job and the show seemed to move along without a hitch. There are some changes in the wind for next year as Joe and his team tweak things to what they think the show should be.

We did introduce our new PRR X29D as well as took reservations for our upcoming SAL V9 ventilated boxcar. While the X29D does have a problem, as pointed out by Tim O'Connor. We sold them and gave folks the option of taking the body as is or surrendering the body with the understanding that a replacement would be sent to them asap. It was about an even split from our customers on how they handled this. BTW, Jim King informs us that he will be shipping 50 to 60 replacement bodies to us by the end of the week. We certainly appreciate the way Jim took ownership of this issue and his immediate response to the problem Jim thanks, you are a standup guy and it is a pleasure doing business with you.

Folks, as always, pretty much stripped Martins sales room down to the bare boxes. He was selling some of his display models for a Benjamin a pop.

F and C was there with his usual buy so many and get something for free deals. There was also a person there selling resin kits for much less than he paid for them. Don’t know why, don't care. Lots of folks took him up on this.

I felt that the display room had fewer models than in the past. There were a couple of functional modular railroads in there as well. Steam era freight cars were by far the most common cars in the display room.

All in all a good show, not a great one. More than happy to be there and looking forward to next years event.

Denis Blake


2011 Central Ohio Prototype Modelers Meet, May 5-8

http://www.facebook.com/pages/manage/#!/pages/Central-Ohio-Prototype-Modelers-Meet/326645470797

-----Original Message-----
From: Anthony Thompson
Sent: Monday, October 25, 2010 1:28 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Naperville

I thought this year's Naperville meet was quite good, very much
in the tradition of the previous ones conducted by Sunshine (and yes,
Sunshine was there selling kits to the usual enthusiastic buyers).
Slightly fewer clinicians due to slightly lower early registration,
thus concerns about costs, but overall a fine meet. IMO Joe Delia did
an excellent job running it, so I'll be looking forward to future
versions of this meeting.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links









No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 9.0.862 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3218 - Release Date: 10/25/10 02:34:00


Naperville

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

I thought this year's Naperville meet was quite good, very much in the tradition of the previous ones conducted by Sunshine (and yes, Sunshine was there selling kits to the usual enthusiastic buyers). Slightly fewer clinicians due to slightly lower early registration, thus concerns about costs, but overall a fine meet. IMO Joe Delia did an excellent job running it, so I'll be looking forward to future versions of this meeting.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Wabash ACF 70-ton Gondola was [Wabash large flag lettering scheme]

rwitt_2000
 

Chet,

Yes, you are correct. I am not sure how I missed the other note, but the
other 17 cars are under Note AAA1 in the April 1959 ORER that states
they have a different AAR mechanical designation than GB. The note
doesn't explicitly state they are equipped with racks for auto frame
loading. In the October 1959 all gondolas in series 12600 to 12649 are
designated as AAR GBS and note BB states that they are equipped with
racks for passenger frame loading.

Hopefully this clarifies the dates of the conversions and also indicates
that these gondolas ran for a relatively brief time as general service
gondolas.

Does anyone have photos and descriptions of these racks as the Tangent
model seems to be begging for this conversion?

Bob Witt



Chet French wrote:

Bob,


The July 1958 ORER shows the same 33 cars having racks for Ford
passenger frames (Note DD) and Note HH lists the other 17 cars having
Mercury frame racks. Check the 1959 Register to see if the other 17
cars show having racks. The racks were installed in these cars sometime
during 1956. My next source of information, the Jan 1964 Wabash
equipment book shows all 50 cars equipped with Ford frame racks.

The January 1, 1957 Wabash equipment book shows all 50 cars
equipped
with racks in 1956. Those equipped with Ford frame racks had an
"8"
stenciled above the reporting marks and the cars with Mercury frame
racks were stenciled"54".
Tim O'Connor replied:


It's very odd that 50 had racks in 1957, but only 33 in 1959
(their numbers are listed in Note DD), and then all 50 again
later.





According to the October 1955 ORER no Wabash gondolas in the series
12600-12649 were assigned to auto frame service, but the April 1959
ORER
lists 33 converted to with racks to carry Ford passenger frames with
the
individuals cars listed in note DD1,and the October 1959 ORER lists
all
50 of these gondolas assigned to auto frame service. Which source
should
we believe? I would tend to the ORER as railroads often had plans,
but
often lack funds to implement them. I don't have an ORER between
October
1955 and April 1959 to verify Chet's information.

As of April 1959 the following 33 gondolas in the 12600 to 12649
series
had racks to haul passenger frames.

12600 to
12606,12610,12611,12612,12614,12616,12617,12618,12621,12623,12624,12627,&#92;
&#92;
12628,12629,12631,12633to
12636,12638,12639,12640,12643,12645,12647,12648,12649

Hopefully having the cars numbers and a narrower date range will
help
models determine which car numbers are appropriate for general
service
or for auto frame service. Did anyone find a photo of these cars
with
the racks for auto frame service?

Regards,

Bob Witt





Re: Wabash ACF 70-ton Gondola was [Wabash large flag lettering scheme]

cef39us <cfrench@...>
 

Bob,


The July 1958 ORER shows the same 33 cars having racks for Ford
passenger frames (Note DD) and Note HH lists the other 17 cars having Mercury frame racks. Check the 1959 Register to see if the other 17 cars show having racks. The racks were installed in these cars sometime during 1956. My next source of information, the Jan 1964 Wabash equipment book shows all 50 cars equipped with Ford frame racks.

Chet French
Dixon, IL

The January 1, 1957 Wabash equipment book shows all 50 cars equipped
with racks in 1956. Those equipped with Ford frame racks had an "8"
stenciled above the reporting marks and the cars with Mercury frame
racks were stenciled"54".
Tim O'Connor replied:


It's very odd that 50 had racks in 1957, but only 33 in 1959
(their numbers are listed in Note DD), and then all 50 again
later.





According to the October 1955 ORER no Wabash gondolas in the series
12600-12649 were assigned to auto frame service, but the April 1959 ORER
lists 33 converted to with racks to carry Ford passenger frames with the
individuals cars listed in note DD1,and the October 1959 ORER lists all
50 of these gondolas assigned to auto frame service. Which source should
we believe? I would tend to the ORER as railroads often had plans, but
often lack funds to implement them. I don't have an ORER between October
1955 and April 1959 to verify Chet's information.

As of April 1959 the following 33 gondolas in the 12600 to 12649 series
had racks to haul passenger frames.

12600 to
12606,12610,12611,12612,12614,12616,12617,12618,12621,12623,12624,12627,&#92;
12628,12629,12631,12633to
12636,12638,12639,12640,12643,12645,12647,12648,12649

Hopefully having the cars numbers and a narrower date range will help
models determine which car numbers are appropriate for general service
or for auto frame service. Did anyone find a photo of these cars with
the racks for auto frame service?

Regards,

Bob Witt





Re: Warning Labels

mcindoefalls
 

I feel your pain, John, but I also infer that this was a new medium for you? An hour spent experimenting with the stuff on scrap styrene and a few junk car or locomotive shells would have been a wise investment. I hope you can recover and save the cars that turned out so poorly.

Walt Lankenau


Re: PRR standard red oxide paint and GLa trucks

Benjamin Hom
 

Steve Lucas asked:
"I'm building a few P-Company cars and would like suggestions as to the
best model paint match for them."

It depends on when you're modeling. For cars painted before 1945, I prefer Polly Scale Zinc Chromate Primer; for cars painted after WWII, PollyScale Special Oxide Red.


"Also, would GLa hoppers have been fitted with Crown trucks?"

Yes, according to Tracing No. C422800-E, but of the 50-ton variety (PRR Class 2D-F1). These have a 4 in shorter wheelbase than the 70-ton trucks available in HO scale from Bowser and Walker Model Services.
http://prr.railfan.net/trucks/C422800-E.pdf
http://prr.railfan.net/diagrams/PRRdiagrams.html?diag=2d-f2.gif&sel=ftk&sz=sm&fr=
http://prr.railfan.net/diagrams/PRRdiagrams.html?diag=2f-f1.gif&sel=ftk&sz=sm&fr=


"And did TKM ever carry an article on the GLa cars?"

No. Your best bets for the time beinng is the GLA chapter in Teichmoeller book or the corresponding article in the April 1993 issue of Model Railroading, and Richard Burg's article in the February 2002 issue of Railmodel Journal. Additionally, there are prototype photos in Jim Hunter's classic Athearn twin kitbash in the August 1986 issue of RMC.


Ben Hom


Re: PRR standard red oxide paint and GLa trucks

Bruce Smith
 

Steve,

Paint - era? (pre WWI, post WWII...?), cars?

Trucks - no "crown" trucks on GLa hoppers... after all, that's a 70 ton
truck and a 50 ton hopper <G>. As built, the cars rode on arch bar
trucks. Later, most used the ubiquitous PRR 2D-F8 truck. I don't think
TKM has covered GLa cars yet.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

"Steve Lucas" <stevelucas3@...> 10/24/10 4:11 PM >>>
I'm building a few P-Company cars and would like suggestions as to the
best model paint match for them.

Also, would GLa hoppers have been fitted with Crown trucks? And did TKM
ever carry an article on the GLa cars?

Thanks in advance,

Steve Lucas.



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


PRR standard red oxide paint and GLa trucks

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I'm building a few P-Company cars and would like suggestions as to the best model paint match for them.

Also, would GLa hoppers have been fitted with Crown trucks? And did TKM ever carry an article on the GLa cars?

Thanks in advance,

Steve Lucas.


Wabash ACF 70-ton Gondola was [Wabash large flag lettering scheme]

rwitt_2000
 

From a very old post for which I did some more research ...



ChetFrench wrote:



The January 1, 1957 Wabash equipment book shows all 50 cars equipped
with racks in 1956. Those equipped with Ford frame racks had an "8"
stenciled above the reporting marks and the cars with Mercury frame
racks were stenciled"54".
Tim O'Connor replied:


It's very odd that 50 had racks in 1957, but only 33 in 1959
(their numbers are listed in Note DD), and then all 50 again
later.





According to the October 1955 ORER no Wabash gondolas in the series
12600-12649 were assigned to auto frame service, but the April 1959 ORER
lists 33 converted to with racks to carry Ford passenger frames with the
individuals cars listed in note DD1,and the October 1959 ORER lists all
50 of these gondolas assigned to auto frame service. Which source should
we believe? I would tend to the ORER as railroads often had plans, but
often lack funds to implement them. I don't have an ORER between October
1955 and April 1959 to verify Chet's information.

As of April 1959 the following 33 gondolas in the 12600 to 12649 series
had racks to haul passenger frames.

12600 to
12606,12610,12611,12612,12614,12616,12617,12618,12621,12623,12624,12627,&#92;
12628,12629,12631,12633to
12636,12638,12639,12640,12643,12645,12647,12648,12649

Hopefully having the cars numbers and a narrower date range will help
models determine which car numbers are appropriate for general service
or for auto frame service. Did anyone find a photo of these cars with
the racks for auto frame service?

Regards,

Bob Witt


Re: Warning Labels

Rob & Bev Manley
 

John,
I use Polyscale for both brush painting and airbrushing. for the brush painting I use high quality artist brushes from Langneckl, Windsor Newton, Grumbacher and others found at real art stores. Never the cheap brushes from the LHS. They are watercolor sable or soft natural hair, some times for a stiffer bristle I will use the synthetics made for acrylics. I use the same bottle for airbrushing. I clean the top rim of the bottle and shake or stir the paint. Stirring when the muck is thick at the bottom and I can see other colors down there like blue to be mixed into the grey.
I use a single action Paasche H with a number 3 tip. If I suspect an older bottle I will strain the paint into my feed cup. I use a clean Micro Sol bottle that I cut the bottom out of and drop a faucet screen into the funnel end. (inverted top of the bottle).
I spray at 35 PSI with regulated/ filtered air into a holding tank. I thin with generic tasteless bottle water like Ice Mountain. Distilled water works too. Between color changes I dump the remaining paint into the trash can, flush with water and clean with a feed cup of Windex with amonia. If I use a stubborn color I'll run some Laquer Thinner through the brush. If I cant get a decent pattern out of the brush I''ll dissassemble it and swab out the brush, nozzle and cup with pipe cleaners and a Q-Tip.
If I rush and mess up, I go to the sink, douse the model with Windex and scrub with luke warm water and an artist Oil natural bristle brush.
I gloss coat with Future and give it a day before I decal. I use Polyscale flat finish thinnedto about 30 - 40% depending on how it looks in the bottle. Some batches can have more viscosity than others. I stopped using Isopropyl alcohol when I bought a bottle of 91% and turned my paint into a sludge. The non tap water works fine.
I admit it does have a steep learning curve but the health benefits far out weigh it for me and my wife.
Sincerely,
Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: <dblake7@...>
To: "Stmfc" <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, October 23, 2010 8:24 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Warning Labels


John remember this. Water based paints are for kids to use for finger painting! Denis Blake
Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

-----Original Message-----
From: John Golden <golden1014@...>
Sender: STMFC@...
Date: Sat, 23 Oct 2010 17:44:12
To: <stmfc@...>
Reply-To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Warning Labels

I told my wife today that the next time I say I'm going to paint a model with
water-based paint, that she should take the biggest, heaviest iron skillet we
have and SMASH ME over the head with it first. It would be a much more
efficient means of causing pain and complete frustration.

Today, in just 45 minutes, I managed to ruin the roofs and ends of three FGE
cars and a GN DS box car with splotches, blobs, paint oceans, and other problems
from using water-based paint. I should've known better. And this was after
spending mucho Johnny-bucks on paint and thinners, cleaning the airbrush for 45
minutes, cleaning numerous clogs and malfunctions, and most importantly wasting
an hour away from the wife and kids. My reward for all this effort? Another
four hours of work. Next the models will get sandblasted (again), then dried,
then painted with good, old fashioned, sticky-but-perfect Scalecoat.

No kidding; that stuff should have a Warning Label on it that reads something
like this:

Warning: This stuff approved for bush-painting only. DO NOT not attempt
to airbrush. Using this paint with an airbrush will cause irritation, anxiety,
frustration, anger, and homicidal behavior. Excessive smashing of nearby items
may result.

Rant complete.

John Golden
Bloomington, IN




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Iwata Airbrushes

Tim O'Connor
 

Doug

I don't have a sink, so I fill up a 5 gallon bucket with 2 gallons
of warm water + cleanser and keep it on the floor nearby so I can
submerge the airbrush and clean it that way! Ya gotta do what ya
gotta do. :-) This is also handy for those big screws up when you
need to dunk the whole car in the bath in a hurry!

Tim

Marty, I have used an Iwata Airbrush for about eight years, I have only used Acrylic paints, Model Flex almost exclusively. And I
shoot straight from the bottle unless a custom mix is needed. I also like to place my paintbooth near a sink with hot running
water so as soon as I finish painting I can immediately hold the airbrush under running water and cleaned it. I also learned to
keep some Windex handy in a larger paint bottle, to spray through the airbrush, the ammonia in the Windex cuts the acrylic paint
very nicely if you have difficulty cleaning the needle or the tip.

The only airbrush problem I have ever had spraying acrylics was when I let some paint residue accumulate on the needle. Other
problems were because paint had gone bad, ie frozen in transit or something causing it to form a geletous lump in the bottle.
Badger has been very good at replacing any paint I had go bad.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Just FYI: selling on Ebay...

Douglas Harding
 

Looking at the seller's other listings, many appear to be Athearn cars, some with Bev-Bel paint schemes. Look at the door claws on
the boxcars. He even uses prototype photos in his "ads". There is a lot of work put into these cars, but they are still Athearn
cars under all that paint. Several sayings come to mind.

Art is in the eye of the beholder.
A fool and his money are soon parted.


Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Warning Labels

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

John,



I primarily use Polly Scale and thin it about 10-15% with Isopropol Alcohol; no problems.  I bought one of those paint stirrers from Micro Mark and use it; I never shake the bottle, wipe the mouth of the jar, etc.  I use an eyedropper to measure the paint; the dropper I use holds about 40 drops of paint; I use another dropper to add the alcohol.  Like Tim said, if you have any left over, THROW IT AWAY!  With white, yellow and silver, I tend to use less thinner because those paints already seem thin to me.  FWIW YMMV.



Jim Brewer

Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, October 23, 2010 9:58:33 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Warning Labels

 




John

What brand did you shoot? I've had some of the best experiences ever
with acrylic paints, and some of the worst -- even from the same brand.

One thing I have learned to do -- always pour out what you think you'll
need from the jar, and re-close the jar tightly. When you are done, if
there is some left over, THROW IT OUT!! Never, ever, ever, ever put it
back into the original jar unless you want to throw out the rest of what
is in the jar. You'll get blobs and bits and dried chunks as your reward
if you try to mix the old and new, and ALSO if you have the original
bottle open for more than a couple of minutes. Totally fresh paint is
usually (but not always) trouble free -- that's why the demos at train
shows make it look so easy! :-)

Tim O'Connor

I told my wife today that the next time I say I'm going to paint a model with
water-based paint, that she should take the biggest, heaviest iron skillet we
have and SMASH ME over the head with it first. It would be a much more
efficient means of causing pain and complete frustration.

Today, in just 45 minutes, I managed to ruin the roofs and ends of three FGE
cars and a GN DS box car with splotches, blobs, paint oceans, and other problems
from using water-based paint. I should've known better. And this was after
spending mucho Johnny-bucks on paint and thinners, cleaning the airbrush for 45
minutes, cleaning numerous clogs and malfunctions, and most importantly wasting
an hour away from the wife and kids. My reward for all this effort? Another
four hours of work. Next the models will get sandblasted (again), then dried,
then painted with good, old fashioned, sticky-but-perfect Scalecoat.

No kidding; that stuff should have a Warning Label on it that reads something
like this:

Warning: This stuff approved for bush-painting only. DO NOT not attempt
to airbrush. Using this paint with an airbrush will cause irritation, anxiety,
frustration, anger, and homicidal behavior. Excessive smashing of nearby items
may result.

Rant complete.

John Golden
Bloomington, IN



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Iwata Airbrushes

Douglas Harding
 

Marty, I have used an Iwata Airbrush for about eight years, I have only used Acrylic paints, Model Flex almost exclusively. And I
shoot straight from the bottle unless a custom mix is needed. I also like to place my paintbooth near a sink with hot running
water so as soon as I finish painting I can immediately hold the airbrush under running water and cleaned it. I also learned to
keep some Windex handy in a larger paint bottle, to spray through the airbrush, the ammonia in the Windex cuts the acrylic paint
very nicely if you have difficulty cleaning the needle or the tip.

The only airbrush problem I have ever had spraying acrylics was when I let some paint residue accumulate on the needle. Other
problems were because paint had gone bad, ie frozen in transit or something causing it to form a geletous lump in the bottle.
Badger has been very good at replacing any paint I had go bad.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Warning Labels

Tim O'Connor
 

John

What brand did you shoot? I've had some of the best experiences ever
with acrylic paints, and some of the worst -- even from the same brand.

One thing I have learned to do -- always pour out what you think you'll
need from the jar, and re-close the jar tightly. When you are done, if
there is some left over, THROW IT OUT!! Never, ever, ever, ever put it
back into the original jar unless you want to throw out the rest of what
is in the jar. You'll get blobs and bits and dried chunks as your reward
if you try to mix the old and new, and ALSO if you have the original
bottle open for more than a couple of minutes. Totally fresh paint is
usually (but not always) trouble free -- that's why the demos at train
shows make it look so easy! :-)

Tim O'Connor

I told my wife today that the next time I say I'm going to paint a model with
water-based paint, that she should take the biggest, heaviest iron skillet we
have and SMASH ME over the head with it first. It would be a much more
efficient means of causing pain and complete frustration.

Today, in just 45 minutes, I managed to ruin the roofs and ends of three FGE
cars and a GN DS box car with splotches, blobs, paint oceans, and other problems
from using water-based paint. I should've known better. And this was after
spending mucho Johnny-bucks on paint and thinners, cleaning the airbrush for 45
minutes, cleaning numerous clogs and malfunctions, and most importantly wasting
an hour away from the wife and kids. My reward for all this effort? Another
four hours of work. Next the models will get sandblasted (again), then dried,
then painted with good, old fashioned, sticky-but-perfect Scalecoat.

No kidding; that stuff should have a Warning Label on it that reads something
like this:

Warning: This stuff approved for bush-painting only. DO NOT not attempt
to airbrush. Using this paint with an airbrush will cause irritation, anxiety,
frustration, anger, and homicidal behavior. Excessive smashing of nearby items
may result.

Rant complete.

John Golden
Bloomington, IN

101641 - 101660 of 195634