Date   

Re: What's on your work bench?

Steve SANDIFER
 

Scenery making stuff, and it is a MESS!
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: Aley, Jeff A
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, August 23, 2010 2:02 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] What's on your work bench?



A Southern Car & Foundry resin kit for a UP Postal car, awaiting stripping and repainting (because I screwed up the clear coat the first time - GRRR). Recommended? Yes.

A Prototype Rails "Shake-N-Take" kit for a UP S-40-6 stock car, awaiting stripping of the paint from the Accurail body. 90% alcohol didn't work, so I'll try ELO next. Recommended? Yes.

A laser-cut 12-panel roof for a UP 65,000 gallon steel water tank. I just received the Archer rivets for this project, so I need to design the form for the tank and the jig for assembling the legs so I can have both laser-cut.

A mock-up of the Arcade Building in Riverside, IL which needs a roof. I may re-do the whole thing w/ the laser, just for fun.

Regards,

-Jeff

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Charlie D modeling the Mopac http://mopac51.tripod
Sent: Monday, August 23, 2010 4:11 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] What's on your work bench?

Wondering what's on your work bench and would you recommend it to another modeler?

I'm converting the Tichy USRA rebuilt boxcar to an ACL rebuilt information from Steve Hoxie and decals from Jerry Glow. Not a difficult conversion remove the steel panel roof yesterday and will add a USRA metal seam version and the underframe needs a fish belly vs the USRA straight one. Not a simple redecal kit but an easy conversion.

Second model is the Rocket Express 50' boxcar - flat resin kit, easy to build. I am replacing the kits ladders with those from a Branchline model and rebuild the lower door tracks with Evergreen 2"x3"'s and 1"x3"'s. I also replaced the tack boards with 1"x8" Evergreen. Recommend it to someone familiar with resin kits.

Charlie Duckworth


Sunshine 24 series kits

JP Barger
 

Greetings,
You'll probably find this amusing, or maybe crazy. I'm trying to assemble
the 26 different Sunshine 24 series wooden 37' meat reefers. So far, I have
only scratched the surface of this BIG job. I have already cut out the parts
for seven cars and sanded the edges for gluing using a manually resharpened
Xacto #11 blade and my various diamond files. It takes about three hours per
car to get this far, so you may see a clue here to what I have gotten myself
into.
I would like to benefit from your collective advice, and draw on your
knowledge of the roof designs on these cars. To start, we could confine
ourselves to the Swift cars, mostly built by General American and after 1931
leased to Swift. Just in beginning to work on these kits, I see an anomaly.
In Gene Green's attractive book on the subject of color pictures of reefers,
page 103, 1954 photos show that the prototype wooden cars had wide
tongue-in-groove transverse boards covering what must have been internal
metal roofs. The width of the roof boards I calculate by rivet(oops, I mean
board) counting comes out at just over five inches. That's about 86 boards
over the length of the roof. But, the Sunshine kits all seem to have
similar narrow pitch board roofs. The patterns for the roofs seem to have
used Evergreen sheet material with narrow width boards. As a result, there
are about 112 boards over the length of the roof.
The same problem appears with the MDC plastic shell 36' reefer kits: there
are apparently two different injection molds for the roofs; one seems to
have too narrow boards, the other too wide.
I was alerted earlier that there were roof board differences between
prototype and model when I visited RPC #14,pages 83 & 96, to find Ed Hawkins
saying that kits 24.7 & 24.8 with board roofs didn't match the real cars,
which came with smooth outside metal roofs. Then, the Green book confirmed
that the Swift cars had wide TIG roofs, at least in 1954.
The affected Sunshine Swift car kits are:

Swift series 5200/ SS kits 24.1-24.3
Swift series 6700/ SS kits 24.4-24.6
Swift series 2500/ SS kits 24.22-24.24

Judging from what I've seen so far, I may need to scratch-build a few roofs
for the cars. That's why I need the best info to get these roofs right. It's
not hard to build new roofs, just time consuming. I've already built some
special roofs for Branchline cars better to represent prototype cars, plain
and OMR with battens, using styrene. Results were great, but more
importantly, I learned about the actual size of these battens. Even better,
what shows of the battens externally is usually the sheet metal covering
over a wood form. A good chance to study the roofs in the CBC's of the late
20's and early 30's!

I will leave it to you whether to send this info to me directly or to the
group. If it's of common interest, surely the group will be enlightened.

Thanks in advance for any help you can give. JP


Re: Pictures of Tools

Aley, Jeff A
 

Bill,

If you scroll down in the Wikipedia article, there are several photos of the mold for LEGO bricks. They're not trains, but at least they're something of a similar size.

What I don't fully understand is the concept of "slides" in a mold.

Regards,

-Jeff


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of lnbill
Sent: Monday, August 23, 2010 12:09 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Pictures of Tools



Thank you Tim, this is sort of what I have in mind. I am realizing I need to be more specific. What I would love to see out pure curiosity is a picture of the cavity in a tool or mold into which the styrene is injected. Ideally it would be a RR subject or something similarly recognizable and not for example a tail light or bottle cap.

Bill Welch, who may be sorry he posted the request.

--- In STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

What I was requesting was photos of the tool(s) used to create plastic kits as I have never seen one.
Bill Welch
Not railroad molds, but I think some of them might be like this
http://image.made-in-china.com/2f0j00pvFECRnDOQru/Plastic-Molds-Injection-Plastic-Molds-Plastic-Mold.jpg

Interesting info and pictures here
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Injection_molding

The Branchline mold I saw had lots of holes on the smooth backside,
for the ejector pins and fluid injection.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

ed_mines wrote:
If I'm not mistaken that "tubing" is what's used to make the needles for hypodermic needles. Boy, is it hard to cut. I used a dremel cut off wheel.
You're right, Ed, the proper name is hypodermic tubing. Dremel works great, IF you put a piece of wire inside before cutting.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: What's on your work bench?

mopacfirst
 

On my downstairs workbench (which my wife hates, since it's the kitchen table): two 42' RC flatcars converted to 13 stake, for MP, and one 45' spliced from two RC flatcars, also MP, which have the decking finished by the Tichy method but are not painted. Also, an F&C CGW PS-0 minus a couple of small details, but I received the decals last week. And, a Life-Like / Sunshine Wabash 50' auto car. Just off is another Life-Like with MDC fishbelly underframe, MP also, and an IC Centralia box from IM parts, riveted sides from the 37 modified XM and P-S ends and roof, and Accurail 5-panel Superior door. Plus two Sunshine flatcars with the decking not attached to the rest of the car. The Bx-11 is awaiting something else getting finished to make room for it.

On the upstairs workbench: five Branchline cars awaiting corner grabs and cut levers (the pin vises are downstairs). One day soon I'll repair the lamp up there so I can see all that stuff.

Ron Merrick

--- In STMFC@..., "Charlie D modeling the Mopac http://mopac51.tripod" <trduck@...> wrote:

Wondering what's on your work bench and would you recommend it to another modeler?


Re: Pictures of Tools

Bill Welch
 

Thank you Tim, this is sort of what I have in mind. I am realizing I need to be more specific. What I would love to see out pure curiosity is a picture of the cavity in a tool or mold into which the styrene is injected. Ideally it would be a RR subject or something similarly recognizable and not for example a tail light or bottle cap.

Bill Welch, who may be sorry he posted the request.

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

What I was requesting was photos of the tool(s) used to create plastic kits as I have never seen one.
Bill Welch
Not railroad molds, but I think some of them might be like this
http://image.made-in-china.com/2f0j00pvFECRnDOQru/Plastic-Molds-Injection-Plastic-Molds-Plastic-Mold.jpg

Interesting info and pictures here
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Injection_molding

The Branchline mold I saw had lots of holes on the smooth backside,
for the ejector pins and fluid injection.

Tim O'Connor


Re: What's on your work bench?

Aley, Jeff A
 

A Southern Car & Foundry resin kit for a UP Postal car, awaiting stripping and repainting (because I screwed up the clear coat the first time - GRRR). Recommended? Yes.

A Prototype Rails "Shake-N-Take" kit for a UP S-40-6 stock car, awaiting stripping of the paint from the Accurail body. 90% alcohol didn't work, so I'll try ELO next. Recommended? Yes.

A laser-cut 12-panel roof for a UP 65,000 gallon steel water tank. I just received the Archer rivets for this project, so I need to design the form for the tank and the jig for assembling the legs so I can have both laser-cut.

A mock-up of the Arcade Building in Riverside, IL which needs a roof. I may re-do the whole thing w/ the laser, just for fun.

Regards,

-Jeff


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Charlie D modeling the Mopac http://mopac51.tripod
Sent: Monday, August 23, 2010 4:11 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] What's on your work bench?



Wondering what's on your work bench and would you recommend it to another modeler?

I'm converting the Tichy USRA rebuilt boxcar to an ACL rebuilt information from Steve Hoxie and decals from Jerry Glow. Not a difficult conversion remove the steel panel roof yesterday and will add a USRA metal seam version and the underframe needs a fish belly vs the USRA straight one. Not a simple redecal kit but an easy conversion.

Second model is the Rocket Express 50' boxcar - flat resin kit, easy to build. I am replacing the kits ladders with those from a Branchline model and rebuild the lower door tracks with Evergreen 2"x3"'s and 1"x3"'s. I also replaced the tack boards with 1"x8" Evergreen. Recommend it to someone familiar with resin kits.

Charlie Duckworth


Re: Pipe size for handrails [Was: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars]

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

AAR/ARA/MCB standard air brake pipe size has been 1 1/4" i.d. for many years--at least a century? My guess is that a major builder used this pipe as an expedient. All North American roads have this pipe diameter and necessary fittings on hand at any rip track. The tools for working with, threading and coupling this pipe together are at hand on the rip track as well.

I used a piece of .019" D/A wire shaped to fit around a now-discontinued NorWest resin CN tank car kit (which I resin-bashed into an Imperial Oil [Esso Canada] tank car). The joint between ends of the railing was hidden inside a stanchion made of .030" x .010" D/A flat wire. A little Tix flux, small-diameter solder, followed by filing and sanding to clean up the work finished the job.

I learnt form working on this car that resin is not harmed by the heat put out by a 40-watt soldering iron--which came in handy when soldering tank railings to stanchions in situ.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Rob & Bev Manley" <robev1630@...> wrote:

One of the tricks I used on my P2K and Tichy tank cars was to substitute the domes plastic grabs with Tichy. When I handled my cars at the meets I grabbed them by the dome. That worked fie until the cars were handled by other members and were grabbed by the ladders, resulting in crushed stanchions and handrailings. I no longer bring tankcars to the shows.

Rob Manley


----- Original Message -----
From: Tim O'Connor
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, August 22, 2010 5:15 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Pipe size for handrails [Was: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars]




Thanks for the help! That's why I asked -- it seemed to me the
handrails that come with the Red Caboose tank car were too small
in diameter, but only somewhat -- they measure out to .016. The
Intermountain plastic handrails are huge -- about .026! I think
the P2K handrails are similar. I truly wish these vendors had
done what Gould did, which I think was brilliant -- he used wire
for the straight handrail parts on the side, with separate pipe
stanchions, and a plastic handrail on the end, where it's much
less likely to break. I never worry when I pick up my Tichy tank
car, but I use kid gloves picking up the P2K and IM cars.

Almost every P2K or Intermountain tank car on my club layout has
broken handrail parts -- and there are dozens of the cars!

Tim O'Connor

>> On a couple of tank cars I measured I found diameters of 1 11/16 and
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What's on your work bench?

gary laakso
 

I have 4 of the Sunshine 1937 Great Northern DS boxcars decaled on one side on the work bench. Next to them are: 1) an Overland Models "Poultry Palace" car awaiting decals; 2) one Westerfield Great Northern truss rod boxcar awaiting floor assembly; 3)- two Sunshine Great Northern Single Sheathed boxcars, bodies assembled, one has the underbody completed; 4)- two Sunshine Great Northern 3000 class DS box cars, bodies assembled, one has the underbody completed; 5)- Overland scale test car just painted and awaiting Great Northern decals that I got from Portland Car and Foundry; 6)- two Sunshine Northern Pacific DS boxcars, both bodies assembled; 7) two Sunshine New York Central gondolas with hole drilling underway with my new Otto Frei drills and drill holder and 8) 3 Red Caboose flatcars being converted to Great Northern; awaiting an order of decals from Portland Car and Foundry. I know the work area has other projects buried under sheets of decals and part boxes!

gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
vasa0vasa@...


Re: What's on your work bench?

Bruce Smith
 

What's on my bench?

1) One each Wegman PFE R-30-12-18 and R-30-13-18, built, painted and lettered and waiting for Tony to get unburied enough to give me a couple of car numbers <G>. The R-30-12-18 has a Red Caboose underframe in place of the Wegman one.

2) As noted in an earlier thread, a Gould/Tichy 120 ton derrick for the PRRPro (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PRRPro/) group project.

3) A variety of loads for open cars, including the Sunshine steel plate load.

4) Some passenger car stuff and some locos in need of decoders.


Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
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Re: What's on your work bench?

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

Charlie--

I had a lot of fun with this Tichy kit, converting it to a model of a CN 470000-series steel-rebuild box car. A new "fish-belly" centre sill was made of styrene sheet, and the ends were changed from a 5/5/5 arrangment to a 7/8, with a scale 4" spacer between the top and bottom panels.

I can see a lot of potential in using this kit for modelling many roads' cars...

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Charlie D modeling the Mopac http://mopac51.tripod" <trduck@...> wrote:


I'm converting the Tichy USRA rebuilt boxcar to an ACL rebuilt information from Steve Hoxie and decals from Jerry Glow. Not a difficult conversion remove the steel panel roof yesterday and will add a USRA metal seam version and the underframe needs a fish belly vs the USRA straight one. Not a simple redecal kit but an easy conversion.

Charlie Duckworth


Re: What's on your work bench?

Armand Premo
 

My work bench?Other than the usual clutter, a BCW (RCS) resin Rutland baggage,a BCW CV brass side coach and a Branchline NYC 6-3 Glen Echo Pullman.plus a slew of Bad Order freight Cars.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: rockroll50401
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, August 23, 2010 12:42 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: What's on your work bench?



Ben, the car is decaled and wash weathered. I'll give it a shot of flat finish and a little airbrush weathering after I'm finished eating..

BTW I wrote 'Figure' should be "Finger" and 'ACF' should be "ASF"

Who proof reads my emails? Nobody!
Clark Propst






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Re: Pictures of Tools

Tim O'Connor
 

What I was requesting was photos of the tool(s) used to create plastic kits as I have never seen one.
Bill Welch
Not railroad molds, but I think some of them might be like this
http://image.made-in-china.com/2f0j00pvFECRnDOQru/Plastic-Molds-Injection-Plastic-Molds-Plastic-Mold.jpg

Interesting info and pictures here
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Injection_molding

The Branchline mold I saw had lots of holes on the smooth backside,
for the ejector pins and fluid injection.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Pictures of Tools

ghslaw31
 

Bill,
The size of the mold depends on the way the model is being made. Injection cast molds are larger than resin cast molds. I make the masters for a line of resin cast models, In many cases the molds are only slightly larger than the models. In resin casting the resin is poured into the mold, air bubbles are drawn out and the resin sets. In injection molding the casting material is actually injected into the mold. There are advantages and dusadvantages to each.One of the biggest advantages to resin casting is that it is less expensive to make a master than in injection casting. The problem is that resin casting is a slower porcess and the molds have a much shorter life. It is often necessary to remake a mold in this process. Injection casting is a much faster manufacturing process and becasue the molds are metal rather that a rubber type material they last much longer.
I hope this isn't more then you ever wanted to know but you did ask. :0)
Gerry Siegel
Mountville Pa.


Re: What's on your work bench?

Clark Propst
 

Ben, the car is decaled and wash weathered. I'll give it a shot of flat finish and a little airbrush weathering after I'm finished eating..

BTW I wrote 'Figure' should be "Finger" and 'ACF' should be "ASF"

Who proof reads my emails? Nobody!
Clark Propst


Re: Pictures of Tools

Bill Welch
 

Thanks Jim:

I have made patterns for resin kits so I am aware of the process for creating molds for resin. I am also aware of how styrene is molded, having built tanks and planes from about the age of 10.

What I was requesting was photos of the tool(s) used to create plastic kits as I have never seen one.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "Jim" <jimbetz@...> wrote:

Bill,

I know a guy who is a plastics mold designer - not for train stuff
but for stuff that is similar in size (slightly larger). It is my
understanding that the molds used for plastics are considerably
different from those used for resin kits.
The majority of the reason why this is true is due to way the
plastic molding machine 'runs' during a production run. Those
machines 'assemble and take apart and assemble and take apart'
the mold at a very high rate. The liquid/heated plastic is 'shot'
(forced under pressure) into them during the brief time they are
assembled - then the whole thing is taken apart (think "several
sliding parts of metal" that are pulled apart in a sequence), the
part is ejected into a bin, the mold is re-assembled ... ad
infinitum.
A resin mold is a two part mold and the resin part sits in it
until it 'cures'. Most of the resin parts/kits we use are
probably not even run thru a molding machine like the plastic
parts/kits ... it is likely to be a 'hand process'. This is
one of the reasons why flash is so different between the two
types.
- Jim


Re: What's on your work bench?

William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Hi Charlie,

Right now on my workbench there are the following... a Tichy USRA boxcar, a Ribside Models 40-ft MILW boxcar, 3 CB&T ATSF Bx48s, and a Speedwitch MKT 40-ft SS boxcar. And on the rip-track lead there are three from IM... an ATSF WE boxcar (that needs work -- same as Ben's -- plus a coupler conversion to Sergents), an ATSF SK-R and a GA-7 (both for detailing). And looking a bit farther down the track there are the following... Westerfield PRR G-22 (BO w/ a bum coupler), and a Tichy 40-ft flat car that requires a coupler conversion (Kadees to Sergents). Then this bunch plus another completed half-dozen cars will get weathering.

Happy modeling to all.

Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


Pipe Unions, tees, and elbows in brass

Bob McCarthy
 

Howdy!

    If any one reading this list would like real brass unions, tees or elbows, contact me off
list.

Thanks,

Bob McCarthy

--- On Mon, 8/23/10, Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:

From: Jim Betz <jimbetz@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Pipe Unions
To: STMFC@...
Date: Monday, August 23, 2010, 1:21 AM







 









Hi,



Very short lengths of shrink tubing make very nice HO scale

pipe unions and angle fittings.

Put it on 'loose' and move it to where you want it, when you

want it there, and shrink around the brass wire.

Need it thicker? Use two and shrink the first and then put

the second over it.

Use slightly longer lengths to do "corners". Can even be

used to form "T" joints by using 3 pieces (one on each leg)

and then 'joining' in the middle with some Krystal Klear.

Will hold paint but not real well - acrylics slightly better

than lacquers in this regard. It is better to use a color for

the shrink tubing that 'blends' with the rest of the model

(black usually) ... and the piping color.

You can even use it to 'join' two pieces of scale piping.

For instance if you break a hand rail you can slip on some

shrink tube on one side, align and slide it over the other

so it covers both, and shrink to lock in place.

- Jim


Re: What's on your work bench?

asychis@...
 

Three F&C MoPac gondolas
Two ARM ART steel reefers (finishing touches)

Three non-freight car models

Jerry Michels


Re: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:
Mike, you should try Ted Culotta's technique, using surgical
tubing to just slip over the handrail wire. It is easy to do and when
finished, is almost invisible (though if noticed, it looks just like a
pipe union). I'm very impressed with it (get the tubing from Small
Parts).
If I'm not mistaken that "tubing" is what's used to make the needles for hypodermic needles. Boy, is it hard to cut. I used a dremel cut off wheel.

Ed

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