Date   

Re: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
P.S. re: Tom's photo -- anyone know the diameter of that handrail pipe?

Tim O'Connor
Tim,
On a couple of tank cars I measured I found diameters of 1 11/16 and 1 3/4 inches. Both those measurements are probably slightly off since pipes have weird ID and OD measurements not directly related to their nominal size in inches. My calipers probably measured some number of paint layers as well.

For complete details on pipe diameters typically used in freight cars see AIRBRAKE PIPES in the Nov 1995 issue of Mainline Modeler, page 73.

Gene Green


Re: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

The Small Parts web page lists tubing of various materials, including stainless steel; would it be easier to use this and CA the railings?  I haven't tackled any of the resin tank car kits yet (although I am "storing" several at this time!).



Jim Brewer

Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----
From: RUTLANDRS@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, August 22, 2010 8:23:41 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

 




Al,
Could one not use the needle part of a syringe?
Chuck Hladik


In a message dated 8/22/2010 8:18:12 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
abrown@... writes:

The method I use is Ted's: knew it wasn't my own idea, but couldn't
remember where I'd seen it (RMC 5/04, pp 75-82). The tubing is fairly flexible,
and it's a little tricky to keep the handrail sections aligned with each
other. I'd love to stiffen the tubing after installation, maybe by painting
the outside with something that polymerizes? Or maybe they have some with a
thicker wall ... <smoke rises from head>

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In _STMFC@... _ (mailto: STMFC@... ) , Anthony
Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

mike brock wrote:
The only problem I had with the car was joining the two sections of
the handrail which extends around the tank. I think
others...including Al Brown...have devised a better technique than
mine in which I built a "U" shaped handrail which extended over the
length of the car and then soldered on the other end. Not for the
faint of hand.
Mike, you should try Ted Culotta's technique, using surgical
tubing to just slip over the handrail wire. It is easy to do and when
finished, is almost invisible (though if noticed, it looks just like a
pipe union). I'm very impressed with it (get the tubing from Small
Parts).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

Tim O'Connor
 

P.S. re: Tom's photo -- anyone know the diameter of that handrail pipe?

Tim O'Connor

Mike, you should try Ted Culotta's technique, using surgical
tubing to just slip over the handrail wire. It is easy to do and when
finished, is almost invisible (though if noticed, it looks just like a
pipe union).
Which is entirely prototypical:
http://www.pullmanproject.com/TankUnion.jpg

Tom Madden


Re: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

Tim O'Connor
 

Hmmmm... I was just thinking, could tape do the job? I have some
very narrow metallic tape I bought at a hobby shop, maybe 1/32"
wide. I might try this myself on a Red Caboose tank car I'm building.

Tim O'Connor

Mike, you should try Ted Culotta's technique, using surgical
tubing to just slip over the handrail wire. It is easy to do and when
finished, is almost invisible (though if noticed, it looks just like a
pipe union).
Which is entirely prototypical:
http://www.pullmanproject.com/TankUnion.jpg

Tom Madden


Re: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

pullmanboss <tcmadden@...>
 

Anthony Thompson wrote:

Mike, you should try Ted Culotta's technique, using surgical
tubing to just slip over the handrail wire. It is easy to do and when
finished, is almost invisible (though if noticed, it looks just like a
pipe union).
Which is entirely prototypical:
http://www.pullmanproject.com/TankUnion.jpg

Tom Madden


Re: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

Clark Propst
 

"In short in my experience, building a resin stock car is like falling
off a log compared to building a resin tank car." Bill Welch

I've built a few stock cars and only one SC&F tank car, but couldn't agree more with Bill. Heck, I dread putting together P2K tank cars!
Clark Propst


Re: Bob's Photo address

water.kresse@...
 

Bob's Photo

PO Box 52

Wallingford, KY

41093



(606) 845-3323



bobsphoto@...   (never tried)



If you are looking for something specific photo subject wise for Naperville, let him know ahead of time so he can  bring that specific binder.



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Re: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

al_brown03
 

The method I use is Ted's: knew it wasn't my own idea, but couldn't remember where I'd seen it (RMC 5/04, pp 75-82). The tubing is fairly flexible, and it's a little tricky to keep the handrail sections aligned with each other. I'd love to stiffen the tubing after installation, maybe by painting the outside with something that polymerizes? Or maybe they have some with a thicker wall ... <smoke rises from head>

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

mike brock wrote:
The only problem I had with the car was joining the two sections of
the handrail which extends around the tank. I think
others...including Al Brown...have devised a better technique than
mine in which I built a "U" shaped handrail which extended over the
length of the car and then soldered on the other end. Not for the
faint of hand.
Mike, you should try Ted Culotta's technique, using surgical
tubing to just slip over the handrail wire. It is easy to do and when
finished, is almost invisible (though if noticed, it looks just like a
pipe union). I'm very impressed with it (get the tubing from Small
Parts).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

Charles Hladik
 

Al,
Could one not use the needle part of a syringe?
Chuck Hladik

In a message dated 8/22/2010 8:18:12 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
abrown@... writes:




The method I use is Ted's: knew it wasn't my own idea, but couldn't
remember where I'd seen it (RMC 5/04, pp 75-82). The tubing is fairly flexible,
and it's a little tricky to keep the handrail sections aligned with each
other. I'd love to stiffen the tubing after installation, maybe by painting
the outside with something that polymerizes? Or maybe they have some with a
thicker wall ... <smoke rises from head>

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...) , Anthony
Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

mike brock wrote:
> The only problem I had with the car was joining the two sections of
the handrail which extends around the tank. I think
> others...including Al Brown...have devised a better technique than
mine in which I built a "U" shaped handrail which extended over the
length of the car and then soldered on the other end. Not for the
faint of hand.
Mike, you should try Ted Culotta's technique, using surgical
tubing to just slip over the handrail wire. It is easy to do and when
finished, is almost invisible (though if noticed, it looks just like a
pipe union). I'm very impressed with it (get the tubing from Small
Parts).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

mike brock wrote:
The only problem I had with the car was joining the two sections of the handrail which extends around the tank. I think others...including Al Brown...have devised a better technique than mine in which I built a "U" shaped handrail which extended over the length of the car and then soldered on the other end. Not for the faint of hand.
Mike, you should try Ted Culotta's technique, using surgical tubing to just slip over the handrail wire. It is easy to do and when finished, is almost invisible (though if noticed, it looks just like a pipe union). I'm very impressed with it (get the tubing from Small Parts).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

mike brock <brockm@...>
 

Bill Welch writes:

I have starting cleaning up the parts on Jon Cagle's kits and I think
these are well thought out although the ends of bottom of the tank do
not mesh well with the upper portion of the tank. His inclusion of
templates will be helpful I think when I get to that stage.
Hmmm. I didn't have any difficulty with that aspect. I refer to the 2 compartment car, GATX 1638, of which you can see photos in the photo section under GATX. The only problem I had with the car was joining the two sections of the handrail which extends around the tank. I think others...including Al Brown...have devised a better technique than mine in which I built a "U" shaped handrail which extended over the length of the car and then soldered on the other end. Not for the faint of hand.

However, I actually had no trouble with building that car...which I consider my favorite car AND one of the most important Even just one 2 dome tank car makes a big statement when partnered with a bevy of single domed cars. I'll add that I knocked it to the floor when nearly completed. Noooo problem. Just a bit of glue and...ready for a load of...well...wine [ not for Laramie, surely ].

Mike Brock


Re: Train of Thought- Sanding resin flash, or: avoiding bloody finge

Paul Lyons
 

Dennis,

Can you expand a bit on your email below. I am not sure i understand what you are saying about "take the back of an x-acto(?) and scrape all the holes from the outside in(?)"

Paul Lyons

-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Williams <pennsy6200@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sat, Aug 21, 2010 6:25 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Train of Thought- Sanding resin flash, or: avoiding bloody finge




Guys.

The stock car kits are not all that bad. If you take the back of an x-acto and scrap all the holes from the outside in, Remember to scrap the flask from the inside. This takes a little axtra time, but worth it. IMO.
Dennis
--- On Fri, 8/20/10, Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:

From: Jim Betz <jimbetz@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Train of Thought- Sanding resin flash, or: avoiding bloody finge
To: STMFC@...
Date: Friday, August 20, 2010, 10:03 PM



Hi,

Sorry guys ... the intended smiley face got left off my prior
post. That wasn't a serious offer to sell - it was meant as a
comment on the thread and the difficulties of building these
cars. But I did check - and I don't have any resin stock cars
in my "hobby shop in the closet". If I had ... I probably would
be selling them after reading the last couple of digests!

Bruce - cash or cache ... it's all the same to me. ;-)

- Jim (who's really happy he hasn't commented
recently on the typing skills of others
... and even happier he doesn't "text".)

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Re: Reducing 1/48 drawing to 1/87

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Aug 20, 2010, at 11:55 AM, ckeithjordan wrote:

Credit where credit is due: Nolan is quoting Bob Dylan in "My Back Pages."

and especially the cover by the Byrds.

ObSTFMC: Garcia and Grisman, on "Not for Kids Only" did a canonical
rendition of Elizabeth Cotton's "Freight Train". It was a soft, slow,
almost lullaby, conjuring up images of reefer and beet blocks in the
Central Valley of California behind various and sundry belching
behemoths before the onset of Rudolph's Diseasels.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, native Californian since 1944
"Every freight train has at least one NP box car"
the Brock Corollary to the GN hypothesis


Re: Reducing 1/48 drawing to 1/87

Nolan Hinshaw
 

On Aug 20, 2010, at 8:54 AM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Steve makes an excellent point. Most copy machines are off by a
few percent. If you measure a 1:1 copy, for example, it is often 98%
(plus or minus) of the original. So you cannot count on a setting such
as 55% to yield exactly that percentage. As Steve says, try it and
make sure.

That's why I mentioned earlier the use of a good scanner and a CAD
program. The combination's much more precise and accurate than what
you can get out of most photocopiers.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, native Californian since 1944
"Every freight train has at least one NP box car"
the Brock Corollary to the GN hypothesis


FS: Moody's Industrials 1957

Dave Nelson
 

Old Moody's Industrial's don't show up very often so I post them when the
do.



Reasonable price, IMO. Don't know seller

1. Moody's Industrial Manual 1957,



Moody's Investors Service, 1957, Library binding, , This is a bound edition
of Moody's Industrial Manual. Ex-library copy with usual markings. Loose
binding. Rip on gutter.

Bookseller: Books From California, Simi Valley, CA

Price: US$ 80.00



View or Order this Book:

http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/ListingDetails?bi=3217015955
<http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/ListingDetails?bi=3217015955&cm_ven=nl&cm_c
at=trg&cm_pla=want&cm_ite=viewbook>
&cm_ven=nl&cm_cat=trg&cm_pla=want&cm_ite=viewbook



Dave Nelson


Re: Bob Liljestrand's (aka Bob's Photos) Current Address, Telephone or Email?

Bob Slavinski
 

Hi there....I goolged Bob's Photo's in Ansonia, CT and got a phone number of
(203) 734-6666.....and an address of 37 Spring Street....hope this helps...
Bob Slavinski




________________________________
From: Kathe Robin <kathe@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sat, August 21, 2010 12:08:53 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Bob Liljestrand's (aka Bob's Photos) Current Address, Telephone
or Email?

 
Fellow Freight Car Aficionados

Can anyone supply a current means of contacting Bob? I seem to have lost
his most current address and would like to contact him for some needed info.

TIA to all,

Max

===========================================================================

email: m_robin@...

smail: Max S. Robin, P.E.

Cheat River Engineering Inc. /P.O. Richwood Place

Denville, NJ 07834

voice: 973-945-5007 8:00AM-11:00PM M-F, 11:30AM-11:0000PM WE, Eastern

===========================================================================

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What is happening?

Jared Harper
 

I've clicked on several messages to make a reply and all I get is "Message #-------- cannot be retrieved from Yahoo. What's happening?
Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Laser-cut resin?

Aley, Jeff A
 

Group (esp. Tom Madden),

Can resin be laser-cut? I am thinking not only of the flash on a stock car model, but even of "converting" a single-sheathed box car to a stock car by cutting out the offending boards. Are resin castings dimensionally similar enough to allow such a thing?

Regards,

-Jeff


Building Stock Cars vs. Tank Cars

Bill Welch
 

I have built both the Westerfield New York Central and Northern
Specific NP stock cars and they are two of my favorite models. I
don't remember anything special except there was a little more clean
up. I did scratch build what I thought was a more accurate roof for
the NYC model now available from Speedwitch.

To me tank cars are much more challenging. I have done three of the
Speedwitch tanks cars which went well but they are mostly styrene. I
have built two Sunshine insulated and two UTLX tank cars and I am
still working on the Vinegar tank car which I work on until I get
tired of fooling/fiddling with it and pick it up months later. I have
also prepped the parts for Sunshine's GATX but put it aside when I
realized the parts did not line up well on the underframe. Personally
I think more thought needs to go in the engineering of these kits
although the results are stunning IMO and I am willing to go the
extra mile.

I have starting cleaning up the parts on Jon Cagle's kits and I think
these are well thought out although the ends of bottom of the tank do
not mesh well with the upper portion of the tank. His inclusion of
templates will be helpful I think when I get to that stage.

In short in my experience, building a resin stock car is like falling
off a log compared to building a resin tank car.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764
727.470.9930
fgexbill@...


Re: Train of Thought- Sanding resin flash, or: avoiding bloody finge

Dennis Williams
 

Guys.
 
The stock car kits are not all that bad. If you take the back of an x-acto and scrap all the holes from the outside in, Remember to scrap the flask from the inside.  This takes a little axtra time, but worth it. IMO.
  Dennis

--- On Fri, 8/20/10, Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:


From: Jim Betz <jimbetz@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Train of Thought- Sanding resin flash, or: avoiding bloody finge
To: STMFC@...
Date: Friday, August 20, 2010, 10:03 PM


 



Hi,

Sorry guys ... the intended smiley face got left off my prior
post. That wasn't a serious offer to sell - it was meant as a
comment on the thread and the difficulties of building these
cars. But I did check - and I don't have any resin stock cars
in my "hobby shop in the closet". If I had ... I probably would
be selling them after reading the last couple of digests!

Bruce - cash or cache ... it's all the same to me. ;-)

- Jim (who's really happy he hasn't commented
recently on the typing skills of others
... and even happier he doesn't "text".)











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]