Date   

Re: GN 43892

railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
 

The Northwest Railway Museum has two 50', double door, single sheathed GN cars, 43940 and 43948. These were in service up to 1963 when they were sold to Longview Fibre in Longview, WA for inplant service. In the 80's they had dozens of these along with some Milwaukee cars. Our two cars have end doors but they were welded shut by the GN.

Richard Wilkens

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Charlie

True enough. But I was more referring to the car still having
double doors, while many were rebuilt with single doors and many
others were rebuilt with steel sides. Westerfield makes both the
single and double door versions (but not the steel rebuilds) so
now I can justify both versions.

Tim

At 4/17/2009 04:16 PM Friday, you wrote:
Tim-
Not so much as you would think. GN, NP, CB&Q, and MILW had big fleets of single sheathed box cars and they still showed up on "The Racetrack" on Q freights going through Congress Park and Brookfield with enough regularity that they were noticed, but not remarkable. Some lasted into the "no-roofwalk" well into the late sixties at least.
Charlie Vlk

----- Original Message -----
From: Tim O'Connor
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2009 9:20 PM
Subject: [STMFC] GN 43892

fairly rare to see these unrebuilt cars in 1962...
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=350190665835

Tim O'Connor


Re: A Different Way To Move A Freight Car

railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
 

From about 1928 to 1941 Seattle City Light operated a two day visit to the Skagit Project that included a train trip from Rockport 23 miles to Newhalem and a 7 mile trip from Newhalem to Diablo Dam. Visitors rode up the incline but not in rail cars, they stood on the deck. An accident had occured when a contractor was killed after the incline car suddenly dropped to the bottom and a hopper car of gravel on the incline flipped over and crushed him. After that nobody but authorized crews were allowed to ride the incline along with a car.

Richard Wilkens

--- In STMFC@..., MOFWCABOOSE@... wrote:

They hauled more then freight up that incline. There was apparently a short-lived attempt to operate as a tourist railroad and pictures exist showing passenger cars (converted from flat cars) operating on that incline.

John C. L Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


-----Original Message-----
From: railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wed, 15 Apr 2009 11:13 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: A Different Way To Move A Freight Car








When Seattle City Light built the Skagit River Railway in Washington State for hauling supplies in building 3 dams they looked at hauling boxcars up an incline by their couplers but decided that it was too dangerous if the load shifted. Instead they built an incline platform that moved the car over 300 vertical feet up the hill to the height of Diablo Dam. This was used for moving freight cars from around 1930 to 1954 when the railroad was abandoned. The incline still exists and moves truck loads of supplies.

Here is a photo from the late 40's while building the larger upstream Ross Dam.

http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t116/railsnw/incline.jpg

Richard Wilkens

--- In STMFC@..., "Jack Burgess" <jack@> wrote:

Possibly, but there's a whole electrical power plant down there
at the base of the dam. There must have been a lot of car loads
of machinery and other items... not to mention giant turbines...

Tim O'Connor
True, but hoisting a box car full of heavy parts (which might not be loaded
evenly front to back) would have been risky. Transporting the box car down
an aerial tram would have suggested that the contents were evenly
distributed and labor intensive to unload and move down the tram...in the
days of cheap labor, the latter might not have been an issue but the Six
Companies had some good engineers who would have been watching anything
which held up the construction schedule. Heavy turbines and would have
arrived on flat cars and, because of their cost and size, would have been
delivered to the power house individually...

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: GN 43892

Tim O'Connor
 

Charlie

True enough. But I was more referring to the car still having
double doors, while many were rebuilt with single doors and many
others were rebuilt with steel sides. Westerfield makes both the
single and double door versions (but not the steel rebuilds) so
now I can justify both versions.

Tim

At 4/17/2009 04:16 PM Friday, you wrote:
Tim-
Not so much as you would think. GN, NP, CB&Q, and MILW had big fleets of single sheathed box cars and they still showed up on "The Racetrack" on Q freights going through Congress Park and Brookfield with enough regularity that they were noticed, but not remarkable. Some lasted into the "no-roofwalk" well into the late sixties at least.
Charlie Vlk

----- Original Message -----
From: Tim O'Connor
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2009 9:20 PM
Subject: [STMFC] GN 43892

fairly rare to see these unrebuilt cars in 1962...
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=350190665835

Tim O'Connor


Re: GN 43892

Charlie Vlk
 

Tim-
Not so much as you would think. GN, NP, CB&Q, and MILW had big fleets of single sheathed box cars and they still showed up on "The Racetrack" on Q freights going through Congress Park and Brookfield with enough regularity that they were noticed, but not remarkable. Some lasted into the "no-roofwalk" well into the late sixties at least.
Charlie Vlk

----- Original Message -----
From: Tim O'Connor
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, April 14, 2009 9:20 PM
Subject: [STMFC] GN 43892





fairly rare to see these unrebuilt cars in 1962...
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=350190665835

Tim O'Connor






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Re: Illinois coalfields and hopper

Mike Fortney
 

Deep shaft coal mining in the Coal City-Braidwood area of Illinois began in the late 1870s. Most every railroad running through the area had at least one branch tapping into the coal fields, with the Chicago & Alton being most prominent. What slag heaps remaining today are remnants of that era. In the 1920s strip mining machinery had developed and it quickly proved to be more feasible to mine the coal via that method in this high water table area. By the 1960s, when the last strip mine operation ended, more than 30 square miles of land in eastern Grundy County, southwestern Will County, and western Kankakee County had been strip mined.

Check out the satellite view at http://maps.live.com/ - punch in Braidwood, IL.

One can still pick out many of the branchlines (C&A, EJ&E, K&S).

One of the last few deep shaft mine sites that hasn't been wiped flat by reclamation projects of the Illinois DNR in the last decade is at Toluca, further downstate on the Bunsniff Transcon mainline just west of I-39. The towering slag heap (named "Jumbo" by the locals) and mine site is a town park, with a long, steep pathway (following the slag conveyor's "route")leading up to a lone picnic table at the peak. The site has remained largely undisturbed since the mine closed down in the 1930s and all trackage and buildings were removed. As can be gathered by the name, Toluca was largely settled by Italian immigrant miners and still retains a touch of their culture today.

Mike Fortney

< --- In STMFC@..., water.kresse@... wrote:




Dennis,



First, thanks for your informative response.



I grew up in Downers Grove along the Burlington RR and we drive down to Joilet to the National Cemetery where my dad is buried.  I've noticed what look like slag piles along I55 or Old Route 66.  Did they also strip-mine coal around there, or are those ex-graval pits.



My actual "coal mine experiences" are from the Mus of Science and Industry.  I've never been on I-80, so is there anything left of the coal mining industry left to see?



Al Kresse

Romeo, Michigan




----- Original Message -----
From: "Dennis Storzek" <destorzek@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2009 10:01:10 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Illinois coalfields and hopper

--- In STMFC@..., water.kresse@ wrote:



What kind of coal are we talking about in Illinois and what was it primarily used for.  Illinois had some large steel casting facilities in that era, in addition to their growing steel producing companies up in Chicago and Gary border also.



Al Kresse
Bituminous with a relatively high sulfur content. I don't think it was ever used for metallurgical coal. Most was shipped to power plants; some was owned by the railroads and used as fuel. The Cherry mine:

http://guitarjourney.tripod.com/cherrycoalminedisaster/

was owned by the Milwaukee Road.

Dennis





Re: Illinois coalfields and hopper

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., water.kresse@... wrote:



Dennis,



First, thanks for your informative response.



I grew up in Downers Grove along the Burlington RR and we drive down to Joilet to the National Cemetery where my dad is buried. I've noticed what look like slag piles along I55 or Old Route 66. Did they also strip-mine coal around there, or are those ex-graval pits.
Go a little further south, and you'll come to Coal City :-) That area was strip mined, but I'm not sure when, or when the industry died. Most of the Illinois coal industry was further south.

Coal was the reason for being for the Chicago & Illinois Midland, which at one time was owned by Commonwealth Edison Co., the chicago area electric utility.

My actual "coal mine experiences" are from the Mus of Science and Industry. I've never been on I-80, so is there anything left of the coal mining industry left to see?
I don't think so. There was also an active coal field in Iowa during the early twentieth century. Look for the town of What Cheer on the map.

Dennis


Re: [CDN-frt-cars-n-ops] True Line Trains "slabside" covered hoppers

Ross McLeod <cdnrailmarine@...>
 

Ken Goslett wrote an extensive article on these cars in the August 1986 Railroad Model Craftsman and coauthored a kitbash article in RMC September 1986 - includes some photos.
 
........."Canadian railways were home to over 2700 cars  including two private cars (CGLX) - grain, feed, cement, potash. 1800 said to be on the rooster in 1986. 
 
Ross McLeod Calgary




__________________________________________________________________
Instant Messaging, free SMS, sharing photos and more... Try the new Yahoo! Canada Messenger at http://ca.beta.messenger.yahoo.com/

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Illinois coalfields and hopper

water.kresse@...
 

Dennis,



First, thanks for your informative response.



I grew up in Downers Grove along the Burlington RR and we drive down to Joilet to the National Cemetery where my dad is buried.  I've noticed what look like slag piles along I55 or Old Route 66.  Did they also strip-mine coal around there, or are those ex-graval pits.



My actual "coal mine experiences" are from the Mus of Science and Industry.  I've never been on I-80, so is there anything left of the coal mining industry left to see?



Al Kresse

Romeo, Michigan

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dennis Storzek" <destorzek@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, April 17, 2009 10:01:10 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Illinois coalfields and hopper

--- In STMFC@..., water.kresse@... wrote:



What kind of coal are we talking about in Illinois and what was it primarily used for.  Illinois had some large steel casting facilities in that era, in addition to their growing steel producing companies up in Chicago and Gary border also.



Al Kresse
Bituminous with a relatively high sulfur content. I don't think it was ever used for metallurgical coal. Most was shipped to power plants; some was owned by the railroads and used as fuel. The Cherry mine:

http://guitarjourney.tripod.com/cherrycoalminedisaster/

was owned by the Milwaukee Road.

Dennis



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


PRR Young Trucks

aslt28 <karig@...>
 

At my talk on freight car trucks at the Western Pennsylvania RPM meet last month, somone asked me about Young trucks used on the Pennsyvlania Railroad.

Richard Burg has found three pictures of these trucks in his extensive photographic collection.

From the side, the Young truck appears as a standard Pennsy 2D-F8 series truck. However, a photograph from below shows the distinctive features of the truck. In lieu of a spring plank, the truck has two rods that run below the bolster and anchor into the the sides of the spring seat. A set of elliptic springs is set between these rods and the bolster.

At first glance, it appears that these may be a swing or lateral motion device, but upon closer inspection, it appears that the elliptic springs serve to dampen the vertical motion of the truck. The configuration does appear, though, as if it amy provide some limited lateral motion.

If the questioner is in this group, he can contact me off-line for more information at karig@....

I'm sure that Richard will add these photos to his catalogue.

Bob Karig


Re: Illinois coalfields and hopper

Michael Mang <mnmang@...>
 

Bituminous, and lots of it. Coal production in Illinois peaked in 1918 at
about 90 million tons, but in cumulative total production up to 1963 (end of
STMFC era) Illinois ranked only behind Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

Michael Mang



What kind of coal are we talking about in Illinois and what was it
primarily used for. Illinois had some large steel casting facilities in
that era, in addition to their growing steel producing companies up in
Chicago and Gary border also.

Al Kresse


Re: Illinois coalfields and hopper

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., water.kresse@... wrote:



What kind of coal are we talking about in Illinois and what was it primarily used for.  Illinois had some large steel casting facilities in that era, in addition to their growing steel producing companies up in Chicago and Gary border also.



Al Kresse
Bituminous with a relatively high sulfur content. I don't think it was ever used for metallurgical coal. Most was shipped to power plants; some was owned by the railroads and used as fuel. The Cherry mine:

http://guitarjourney.tripod.com/cherrycoalminedisaster/

was owned by the Milwaukee Road.

Dennis


Re: Illinois coalfields and hopper

water.kresse@...
 

What kind of coal are we talking about in Illinois and what was it primarily used for.  Illinois had some large steel casting facilities in that era, in addition to their growing steel producing companies up in Chicago and Gary border also.



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ted Schnepf" <railsunl@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, April 16, 2009 6:57:36 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Illinois coalfields and hopper

Hi ,

In that time period you would find gondolas, either solid floor or
drop doors, delivering coal.  Few hoppers in the Midwest before WWI.

Ted

At 05:07 AM 4/15/2009, you wrote:
hello,
I've got a question:
when the illinois coalfield near virden, litchfield have been
discovered and what's about them in the 1910 to1919 era?
at this time, what's the main kind of hopper use by railroads to
transport coal in the area, circa 1900 to  1918 before usra design?.
thanks andrew lafayette.
Rails Unlimited
Ted Schnepf
railsunl@...
847-697-5353 or 5366
126 Will Scarlet
Elgin, Ill. 60120
http://RailsUnlimited.ribbonrail.com/

Model Railroad Sales and Service with
a personal touch.
Books new and used.  HO and O scales.
DCC supplies. O scale urethane cars.
Photos and darkroom services.
Checks, cash (0%) or credit (secure server at web site 4% added).



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


2009 NE Proto Meet is May 29-30 in Connecticut

Dave Owens
 

Please note:
If you are seeing this in more than one place, please pardon the
cross-posting. Likewise, if you know of a forum where information
about our meet would be relevant, please cross-post it. We do most of
our promotion in online forums as we are a low-budget operation.



Greetings all:

This year's New England/Northeast Prototype Meet is May 29-30, the
weekend after Memorial Day, at the Canton Community Center, 40 Dyer
Ave., Collinsville, Connecticut.

Again, we are benefiting from a group of remarkably generous
clinicians who will share their skills and knowledge. We'll have a
clinic list and scheduled posted shortly on our website,
www.neprototypemeet.com. A registration form is already posted there.

As with all protomeets, the model display is a key element. We urge
all attendees to bring models to share. There is no judging so please
don't be concerned you and your work will be held to some arbitrary
standard. Locomotives, rolling stock, structures, vehicles, etc., are
welcome.

The meet pre-registration fee is $25, the same it's been the past
several years. Registration at the door is $30.

We hope you can join us.


On another matter, the National Model Railroad Association will
conducts its annual convention in Hartford this summer. Vin Gallogly,
the convention chairman, and his team, including clinic coordinator
John McGloin, have worked incredibly hard to put together what I
believe will be a great convention. The convention is July 5-11 at the
Connecticut Convention Center. For more information, visit
www.hn2009.org

We have been invited to staff a prototype room and would be pleased to
do so if we have enough modelers willing to participate. If you will
be attending the convention, and would like to show models, let us
know.

Thanks,
Dave Owens and the NE Proto Meet team

--
2009 New England/Northeast Prototype Modelers Meet
May 29-30, 2009, Collinsville, CT
www.neprototypemeet.com


[CDN-frt-cars-n-ops] True Line Trains "slabside" covered hoppers

PBowers
 

In the last years of operation, the CN slabside covered hoppers were
used in grain service into our local elevator in Owen Sound for
hauling export grain. I don't know what other services they were
used in at that time. Previous to this they were used for cement
Lime, soda ash and other similar services. I'm not sure if any were
used in tat period for grain service..

Thge first slab side cars I remember at the elevator were CP cars
that were used hauling grain to the mill in Streetsville ON, 108
miles down the line. As well Hanover grain was moved in these
cars. This would be around 1965 I believe.

Prior to this boxcars were the norm. Salt was another later use,
post 1960 era. 1959 era photos show box cars only loading salt at
the Goderich ON mine, I expect cement and lime were main assignments
for tese cars at this time.

The question is, there is a lot of research that needs to be done to
determine where these cars were used at various times in their
careers. What info can we put together to untangle the story of
where these cars wer used?

I hope that others might have some info to fill the voids!

Peter Bowers
===========
Canadian Freight Cars and Operations List
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CDN-frt-cars-n-ops/



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Re: illinois coalfields and hopper

Ted Schnepf
 

Hi ,

In that time period you would find gondolas, either solid floor or drop doors, delivering coal. Few hoppers in the Midwest before WWI.

Ted

At 05:07 AM 4/15/2009, you wrote:
hello,
I've got a question:
when the illinois coalfield near virden, litchfield have been discovered and what's about them in the 1910 to1919 era?
at this time, what's the main kind of hopper use by railroads to transport coal in the area, circa 1900 to 1918 before usra design?.
thanks andrew lafayette.
Rails Unlimited
Ted Schnepf
railsunl@...
847-697-5353 or 5366
126 Will Scarlet
Elgin, Ill. 60120
http://RailsUnlimited.ribbonrail.com/

Model Railroad Sales and Service with
a personal touch.
Books new and used. HO and O scales.
DCC supplies. O scale urethane cars.
Photos and darkroom services.
Checks, cash (0%) or credit (secure server at web site 4% added).


Roof on F&C CPR mini-box question

joth1930s
 

Hello,

While preparing to model five F&C 1929 CPR mini-boxcars, I have been looking at plans (via CP SIG) and multiple photos of these cars and have begun to question F&Cs roof design.

The F&C car roof (Murphy radial all-steel) does indeed follow the design of the plans published in the Nov. 1993 Mainline Modeler article, as well as CPRs own designs found in CP SIG's archives, but photos of the car (where the roof can be seen) do not show any evidence of stiffeners? or seams (a ridge) mid panel.

It is interesting to note that F&C uses the same design roof on their CPR 1932 AAR car while Sunshine's roof (same car) has no ridge line in the middle of the panels of their Murphy radial all-steel roof.

Is it possible that some builders of the 1929 mini-box did not use the exact roof design shown on CPRs own mechanical prints? Does anyone have a good photo of a mini-box roof.

Thanks,

Jonathan


Re: decals needed

lytlemp
 

Jerry,

First go to the following page:

http://www.borhs.org/Archives/resources.html

Then select B&O Fonts and Logos and on that page go to the very bottom and you will find B&O Emblem & Stencling Guides provided by the every so busy Dr. Chris Barken. There you will find B&O Emblem, Box Cars and Hoppers.

Good Luck
Mike


Re: decals needed

jerryglow2
 

--- In STMFC@..., Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...> wrote:

Jim,
 
      Is this info downloadable for non-members? Followed your instructions, however, no pages of this item are to be found.
 
Fred Freitas

--- On Sun, 4/12/09, jim_mischke <jmischke@...> wrote:


From: jim_mischke <jmischke@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: decals needed
To: STMFC@...
Date: Sunday, April 12, 2009, 8:33 PM

Also, check out the B&OHS archives web site (www.borhs.org) and look for the downloadable Chris Barkan scorecard of B&O boxcar lettering schemes. Near the bottom of the web page full of downloadables. It will make sence for you of all the B&O boxcar letterings.


DECALS

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Last week a list of overstocked decals was listed and I found some that I absolutely needed.
It caused me to think about some decals that I had made up that someone else might actually need. A number of years ago I built one of Richard Hendrickson's excellent UP
F-11 flat cars. I wanted to do the car in the delivered scheme with white lettering and yellow
streamliner slogans. Of course I couldn't buy just one set. I do have several exra sets if anyone absolutely needs them. My e-mail is pardiew001@....

Bill Pardie


Re: SANTA FE STEEL CABOOSES

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Thanks Andy:

I appreciate your response and will follow up on the AMB product.

Bill Pardie

On Apr 15, 2009, at 10:38 AM, Andy Sperandeo wrote:



Hi Bill,

I'd jump in and say that all Santa Fe steel way cars had the screens
over the lower window sash except that I know someone would come up
with an example where they were missing, at least on some windows if
not all. I will say that the screens were so common that it's really
rare to find a photo of a car in service without them.

While I haven't gone back and replaced the fake screens I used on
those cars in the 1991 article, these days I prefer to use the
LaserKit screens from American Model Builders (www.laserkit.com,
look under "Windows"). We discussed these here not long ago, last
fall, I think.

You can see what the LaserKit screens look like on my ATSF 1681 in
the "Andy S Freight Cars" album in the Photos section on the Yahoo
STMFC page. I also have some photos of another way car under
construction in an album called "ATSF Way Car (caboose)," but it
doesn't have its screens installed yet.

So far I don't know if the new InterMountain ATSF way cars will come
with screens, or if the LaserKit screens will fit them, but I'm
looking forward to finding out.

Good luck with your way cars,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@...
262-796-8776, ext. 461
FAX 262-796-1142




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