Date   

Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

In 1981 I worked at a plant that made thread protectors for oilfield products. They were steel. There were both internal and external types, with variations in shape and configuration, I'm guessing based on whether they were for API or NPT threads.

Another potential freight car load: We would receive (in PA ) loads of used protectors from the field (western and southwestern US) for refurbishment by pickling and chasing the threads. Even in '81 it made economic sense to do this for the large (16+ inch) sizes. In the Steam Era - when labor was cheap and material expensive, I would not be surprised to learn that all but the smallest sizes were recycled.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Earl Tuson

Both the drill pipe and casing are threaded, and require protective caps during shipment. Nowadays those are plastic (bright blue, red, and so forth,) but I don't know what was used during the steam era.


Re: Norfolk Southern box car

David Wiggs
 

I suppose you guys know there is a relatively new book out there about
the old NS. The ACL/SAL Historical Society has it on their site and is
around 50 bucks.

David in Orlando

-----Original Message-----

1a. Re: Norfolk Southern box car
Posted by: "RUTLANDRS@..." RUTLANDRS@... rutlandrs
Date: Sun Nov 30, 2008 7:04 am ((PST))

Brian,
I posted this for a neighboring NMRA Division. I was told that the
car
info was provided by the NS Historical Society. So the naswer is I
don't know
but will forward the question.


Re: Northern Pacific Lettering Changes

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 3, 2008, at 6:59 AM, railsnw1 wrote:

Richard,

Thank you for the reply. In the NP Classic Steam Locomotive book
their are a couple photos taken in 1939 showing the older lettering
on some double sheathed boxcars and that's what got me thinking about
this. So I'm guessing that by the early 40's at the latest we may
have seen cars lettered this way.








I'd guess that at least a few cars survived World War II with the old
lettering style, given the fact that all but the most essential
maintenance was deferred during the war. There's ample evidencethat
even wood sheathed cars weren't repainted much more often than every
ten years during the 1940s.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Heinz freight car fleet

Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Jerry - Yes. The editor was Bill Dippert, MMR. The last info I have for him (many years old) is 2650 NW Robinia Lane, Portland, OR 97229, (503)646-9783. At one time he was selling complete sets of back issues. - Al Westerfield

----- Original Message -----
From: asychis@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 03, 2008 7:33 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Heinz freight car fleet


Al and Virgil,

Thanks for the information. I'll pursue the articles and see if the NMRA
has any information on the old SIG. Was it called Pickles in Miniature?

Jerry Michels
**************Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try the NEW
AOL.com.
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Re: Pipe loads on the cheap - Drill Pipe

Tim O'Connor
 

What is the typical diameter of drill pipe?
--------------------------------------------------
3 1/2" to 6 1/4" depending on exact usage -- depth and needed "drill"
(torsional) strength. Within certain limitations, a load of drill pipe would not
appear to be much different from (different than) a load of steam locomotive
flue stock; -- fire tubes or Superheater jackets.
Mal Houck

Thanks Mal. In that case, the photo link to the gondola loaded
with pipes must not be drill pipe. If a gondola is 9' (108") wide
and you can see about 10-11 pipes from side to side, then those
pipes must be over 8" in diameter...

Tim O'Connor


Small world was: Re: construction pipes

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "rdietrichson" <Rdietrichson@...> wrote:

Orangeburg pipe was made from building paper laminated together with
a tar binder.
I was in the Summerville, Holly Hill SC area a few times in the past
months and crossed the Orangeburg River daily. I can see why thay made
the pipe from paper. There seemed to be more trees in that area and
Northern Minnesota and Wisconsin combined!
I did see freight cars still lettered for B&O, C&O, and Reading.
Clark Propst


Re: construction pipes

SUVCWORR@...
 

Isn't the vitrified clay pipe what was called, at least during
the steam and transition era, "Orangeburg" pipe here in the east?
I believe that name came from the fact that most of is seemed to be
manufactured in the area surrounding Orangeburg, South Carolina. As
I recall from sales and use of it in the 1950 - 1965 period the
length of a section was some ratio of its outside diameter.





This has been generically referred to as terra cotta pipe or slip joint pipe
in SW PA. Slip joint is what the plumbers call it because the sections just
slip together without any mortar, cement etc. More often than not they also
slipped apart resulting during the ensuing 30 -50 years in may house
laterals needing to be replaced.

Rich Orr
**************Make your life easier with all your friends, email, and
favorite sites in one place. Try it now.
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Re: construction pipes

Richard Hendrickson
 

Since this subject is front and center on the STMFC list right now,
what can you tell me about the pipe in the attached photo? I want to
use this image in my forthcoming book on flat cars and gondolas for
the Santa Fe Historical Society, and I'd like to correctly identify
the pipe in the caption.

Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: buses

MOFWCABOOSE@...
 

Oh, sure.?Detail a freight car down to the Nth degree, and run it on a layout on which a Greyhound bus is being used as a stand-in for a school bus. That would be like using a model eighteen-wheeler as a stand-in for a pickup truck.

There are basically three kinds of bus: The school bus, the transit bus, and the over-the-road bus or motor coach. Each is designed for a particular duty, and seldom (I won't say never, because it has happened) is one?kind used in place of the other.

School buses have been used as transit buses, usually by charter operators who won the low bid to operate a municipal transit system and didn't have enough transit buses, or by the municipality itself when they were starting the system and didn't have transit buses yet. Substituting schoolbuses for transit buses does not usually last long because of customer dissatisfaction. And of course school buses have been run long distances, usually carrying teams or bands, as though they were otr.

Transit buses have been used as school buses, and the practice is probably more common then most people realize. Again, private operators are more likely to do this, though most charter bus companies do not?have transit buses unless, as noted above, they contract to run transit franchises.

Over-the-road buses are bigger and heavier then other buses because they are intended to carry people in comfort over long distances. Because of their size, they are not designed or geared for the frequent stop-and-start requirements of school or transit buses, hence are relatively inefficient when used in that service. It has been done occasionally, but again, is not cost effective. The exception might be for express transit runs that do not make many stops.

The problem that provoked the comment, of course, is that relatively few bus models are available, even in HO. Model railroaders, especially the traction variety, have little empathy for buses, hence the market is small. OTOH, a lot of bus fans (Yes, Virginia, there are such people) are also rail fans. Some years ago I was on a fantrip with members of the Motor Bus Society, and sighting a train generated almost as much excitement as sighting a bus.

As late as 1952 I was going to school on a bus that was not that much different then the Jordan model except that it was longer...we called it "the rattletrap". Great was our surprise when one day it was replaced by a new Ford bus...but we still called it "the rattletrap".

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL

-----Original Message-----
From: Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wed, 3 Dec 2008 7:29 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: construction pipes







Isn't the vitrified clay pipe what was called, at least during
the steam and transition era, "Orangeburg" pipe here in the east?
I believe that name came from the fact that most of is seemed to be
manufactured in the area surrounding Orangeburg, South Carolina. As
I recall from sales and use of it in the 1950 - 1965 period the
length of a section was some ratio of its outside diameter.

While noted New Haven, and computerless, modeler Bill Aldrich and
I were picking up some items yesterday both the black "steel" and the
gray "concrete" offerings from Life-Like were viewed. The former
struck me as a total waste of time and money, especially at the price,
though the "concrete" pipe looked usable. Some straws might look fine
for steel pipe but painted aluminum is much better from the
perspectives of scale, overall cost and durability IMHO. Lastly, I
believe the length of the sectional concrete pipe was also determined
by some ratio of its outside diameter but wonder if some list member
might have something more definite on this.

On a different subject, Bill was looking yesterday for a 1948 era
school bus for his pike but we couldn't find anything that fit. Most
are too modern and the Jordan, I think, bus is too old. We did note
the new 1951-1953 Greyhound buses from Mini-Metals and one of those
might be used in place of a school bus if nothing more accurate than
what we saw can be found.

Don Valentine

--- In STMFC@..., "paulbizier" <pa.bizier@...> wrote:

I'm surprised that some of the other engineers on the list haven't
chimed in, but, at the risk of moderation jail...

vitrified clay (sewer pipes) - most common during steam era -
typically only 4' long. Much of this was regional transport - each
area had its own VCP manufacturing companies

ductile or cast iron - look the same - 20 foot joints - rail
transport
typical then (and now)- various joints - bell and socket and
flanged
most common

transite (an asbestos-cement product) - typically 4-8 feet long -
usual for water main during 50's - smaller diameters, usually (say
less than 12")

PVC - not common in our era, but 10' to 20' sections depending upon
type

Hope this helps.

Paul Bizier

--- In STMFC@..., "ed_mines" <ed_mines@> wrote:

Aren't lot of these construction pipes (like the vitreous clay
pipes)
a lot shorter than 40 feet?

Wouldn't at least some of them be loaded in gondolas?

I'm guessing that they are too heavy for a man to lift (steal) by
himself.

Ed


Re: construction pipes

rdietrichson
 

Orangeburg pipe was made from building paper laminated together with a
tar binder. It came in 8' lengths and was sold either perforated or
solid. Before PVC drainage pipe, it was used primarily in septic fields.


--- In STMFC@..., "Donald B. Valentine" <riverman_vt@...>
wrote:


Isn't the vitrified clay pipe what was called, at least during
the steam and transition era, "Orangeburg" pipe here in the east?
I believe that name came from the fact that most of is seemed to be
manufactured in the area surrounding Orangeburg, South Carolina. As
I recall from sales and use of it in the 1950 - 1965 period the
length of a section was some ratio of its outside diameter.

While noted New Haven, and computerless, modeler Bill Aldrich and
I were picking up some items yesterday both the black "steel" and the
gray "concrete" offerings from Life-Like were viewed. The former
struck me as a total waste of time and money, especially at the price,
though the "concrete" pipe looked usable. Some straws might look fine
for steel pipe but painted aluminum is much better from the
perspectives of scale, overall cost and durability IMHO. Lastly, I
believe the length of the sectional concrete pipe was also determined
by some ratio of its outside diameter but wonder if some list member
might have something more definite on this.

On a different subject, Bill was looking yesterday for a 1948 era
school bus for his pike but we couldn't find anything that fit. Most
are too modern and the Jordan, I think, bus is too old. We did note
the new 1951-1953 Greyhound buses from Mini-Metals and one of those
might be used in place of a school bus if nothing more accurate than
what we saw can be found.

Don Valentine

--- In STMFC@..., "paulbizier" <pa.bizier@> wrote:

I'm surprised that some of the other engineers on the list haven't
chimed in, but, at the risk of moderation jail...

vitrified clay (sewer pipes) - most common during steam era -
typically only 4' long. Much of this was regional transport - each
area had its own VCP manufacturing companies

ductile or cast iron - look the same - 20 foot joints - rail
transport
typical then (and now)- various joints - bell and socket and
flanged
most common

transite (an asbestos-cement product) - typically 4-8 feet long -
usual for water main during 50's - smaller diameters, usually (say
less than 12")

PVC - not common in our era, but 10' to 20' sections depending upon
type

Hope this helps.

Paul Bizier

--- In STMFC@..., "ed_mines" <ed_mines@> wrote:

Aren't lot of these construction pipes (like the vitreous clay
pipes)
a lot shorter than 40 feet?

Wouldn't at least some of them be loaded in gondolas?

I'm guessing that they are too heavy for a man to lift (steal) by
himself.

Ed


Re: construction pipes

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Isn't the vitrified clay pipe what was called, at least during
the steam and transition era, "Orangeburg" pipe here in the east?
I believe that name came from the fact that most of is seemed to be
manufactured in the area surrounding Orangeburg, South Carolina. As
I recall from sales and use of it in the 1950 - 1965 period the
length of a section was some ratio of its outside diameter.

No, vitrified clay pipe is actually made from clay. Orangeburg pipe is made
from wood pulp and pitch according to Wikipedia. There was once an
Orangeburg pipe factory in our town and I always thought that the pipe was
made from wood pulp and asphalt (it might have eventually been made with
asphalt rather than pitch). It was used locally for sanitary sewer laterals
but can eventually deform due to soil pressures, resulting in a oval shape
which can easily cause stoppages. (Our subdivision was built with Orangeburg
laterals and a couple laterals have already failed...I hope we are luckier.)

Orangeburg pipe was developed by the Fiber Conduit Company of Orangeburg,
NY, hence the name...

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: Northern Pacific Lettering Changes

railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
 

Richard,

Thank you for the reply. In the NP Classic Steam Locomotive book
their are a couple photos taken in 1939 showing the older lettering
on some double sheathed boxcars and that's what got me thinking about
this. So I'm guessing that by the early 40's at the latest we may
have seen cars lettered this way.

Thanks again,

Richard Wilkens

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:

On Dec 2, 2008, at 7:31 AM, railsnw1 wrote:

I have been trying to get a better understanding on the changes
to the
lettering on Northern Pacific boxcars. In looking through a
number of
photos from around the late 30's I'm seeing NP cars with the
arched "NORTHERN PACIFIC" and below it the car number only without
the "N.P.".

Does anyone have a time frame when this type of lettering would
have
changed to the reporting marks above the car number?









Richard, I have two photos of NP wood sheathed box cars with the
old
lettering which were repainted and reweighed in 1937, so that
stenciling arrangement lasted at least that long. However, the
9480-9999 series box cars had reporting marks above the numbers
when
delivered by Pacific Car & Foundry in 1937 (but no monad
emblems!) ,
so I think it's safe to assume that the change occurred at that
time.

Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Earl Tuson
 

Tim O' asks,

What is the typical diameter of drill pipe?
Any given well could use a range of pipe sizes.

There are actually two kinds of "pipe" involved, casing and drill pipe. You start out drilling a big hole, with a bit on the bottom of the pipe that is smaller in diameter than the hole you are drilling. Drilling fluids are pumped down through the pipe, cooling the bit and keeping pressure on the formations being drilled through. You can only go so far, or the well could begin collapsing, so you pull out, and insert casing. Casing is a larger pipe. Next, a smaller bit is selected that will fit down inside the casing placed, and drilling commences again. The inital hole size is dependent upon how deep you plan to eventually drill, which is in turn dependent on the particular formation. The largest bit I have knowledge of was a 22 1/2", but the common drill sizes are 12 1/4", 10 5/8", 8 1/2", and 6 1/2". There are additional sizes above and below that as well. I cannot recall the pipe thread sizes on the bottom of the bits, so cannot tell you what sizes the drill pipe is, but I think we only used two thread sizes on the drill sizes I listed above. Casing OD would be a bit smaller than the bit, so it could be shoved into place and then cemented on the outside. ID has to fit the next drill size. So, if you wanted to deliver a load of casing and pipe to a job and haul it all in one freight car load, half has to be one or two sizes of small drill pipe, and half has to be roughly equally divided into several sizes of larger casing.

Both the drill pipe and casing are threaded, and require protective caps during shipment. Nowadays those are plastic (bright blue, red, and so forth,) but I don't know what was used during the steam era.

Earl Tuson
former oil field drill bit engineer


Re: construction pipes

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Isn't the vitrified clay pipe what was called, at least during
the steam and transition era, "Orangeburg" pipe here in the east?
I believe that name came from the fact that most of is seemed to be
manufactured in the area surrounding Orangeburg, South Carolina. As
I recall from sales and use of it in the 1950 - 1965 period the
length of a section was some ratio of its outside diameter.

While noted New Haven, and computerless, modeler Bill Aldrich and
I were picking up some items yesterday both the black "steel" and the
gray "concrete" offerings from Life-Like were viewed. The former
struck me as a total waste of time and money, especially at the price,
though the "concrete" pipe looked usable. Some straws might look fine
for steel pipe but painted aluminum is much better from the
perspectives of scale, overall cost and durability IMHO. Lastly, I
believe the length of the sectional concrete pipe was also determined
by some ratio of its outside diameter but wonder if some list member
might have something more definite on this.

On a different subject, Bill was looking yesterday for a 1948 era
school bus for his pike but we couldn't find anything that fit. Most
are too modern and the Jordan, I think, bus is too old. We did note
the new 1951-1953 Greyhound buses from Mini-Metals and one of those
might be used in place of a school bus if nothing more accurate than
what we saw can be found.

Don Valentine

--- In STMFC@..., "paulbizier" <pa.bizier@...> wrote:

I'm surprised that some of the other engineers on the list haven't
chimed in, but, at the risk of moderation jail...

vitrified clay (sewer pipes) - most common during steam era -
typically only 4' long. Much of this was regional transport - each
area had its own VCP manufacturing companies

ductile or cast iron - look the same - 20 foot joints - rail
transport
typical then (and now)- various joints - bell and socket and
flanged
most common

transite (an asbestos-cement product) - typically 4-8 feet long -
usual for water main during 50's - smaller diameters, usually (say
less than 12")

PVC - not common in our era, but 10' to 20' sections depending upon
type

Hope this helps.

Paul Bizier

--- In STMFC@..., "ed_mines" <ed_mines@> wrote:

Aren't lot of these construction pipes (like the vitreous clay
pipes)
a lot shorter than 40 feet?

Wouldn't at least some of them be loaded in gondolas?

I'm guessing that they are too heavy for a man to lift (steal) by
himself.

Ed


Re: buses

Charles Hladik
 

Maybe the Jordan 1940's City Transit Bus (#244) would be a better option.
Chuck Hladik

In a message dated 12/3/2008 12:11:52 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
MOFWCABOOSE@... writes:




Oh, sure.?Detail a freight car down to the Nth degree, and run it on a
layout on which a Greyhound bus is being used as a stand-in for a school bus. That
would be like using a model eighteen-wheeler as a stand-in for a pickup
truck.

There are basically three kinds of bus: The school bus, the transit bus, and
the over-the-road bus or motor coach. Each is designed for a particular
duty, and seldom (I won't say never, because it has happened) is one?kind used in
place of the other.

School buses have been used as transit buses, usually by charter operators
who won the low bid to operate a municipal transit system and didn't have
enough transit buses, or by the municipality itself when they were starting the
system and didn't have transit buses yet. Substituting schoolbuses for transit
buses does not usually last long because of customer dissatisfaction. And of
course school buses have been run long distances, usually carrying teams or
bands, as though they were otr.

Transit buses have been used as school buses, and the practice is probably
more common then most people realize. Again, private operators are more likely
to do this, though most charter bus companies do not?have transit buses
unless, as noted above, they contract to run transit franchises.

Over-the-road buses are bigger and heavier then other buses because they are
intended to carry people in comfort over long distances. Because of their
size, they are not designed or geared for the frequent stop-and-start
requirements of school or transit buses, hence are relatively inefficient when used in
that service. It has been done occasionally, but again, is not cost
effective. The exception might be for express transit runs that do not make many
stops.

The problem that provoked the comment, of course, is that relatively few bus
models are available, even in HO. Model railroaders, especially the traction
variety, have little empathy for buses, hence the market is small. OTOH, a
lot of bus fans (Yes, Virginia, there are such people) are also rail fans.
Some years ago I was on a fantrip with members of the Motor Bus Society, and
sighting a train generated almost as much excitement as sighting a bus.

As late as 1952 I was going to school on a bus that was not that much
different then the Jordan model except that it was longer...we called it "the
rattletrap". Great was our surprise when one day it was replaced by a new Ford
bus...but we still called it "the rattletrap".

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL

-----Original Message-----
From: Donald B. Valentine <_riverman_vt@riverman__
(mailto:riverman_vt@...) >
To: _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...)
Sent: Wed, 3 Dec 2008 7:29 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: construction pipes

Isn't the vitrified clay pipe what was called, at least during
the steam and transition era, "Orangeburg" pipe here in the east?
I believe that name came from the fact that most of is seemed to be
manufactured in the area surrounding Orangeburg, South Carolina. As
I recall from sales and use of it in the 1950 - 1965 period the
length of a section was some ratio of its outside diameter.

While noted New Haven, and computerless, modeler Bill Aldrich and
I were picking up some items yesterday both the black "steel" and the
gray "concrete" offerings from Life-Like were viewed. The former
struck me as a total waste of time and money, especially at the price,
though the "concrete" pipe looked usable. Some straws might look fine
for steel pipe but painted aluminum is much better from the
perspectives of scale, overall cost and durability IMHO. Lastly, I
believe the length of the sectional concrete pipe was also determined
by some ratio of its outside diameter but wonder if some list member
might have something more definite on this.

On a different subject, Bill was looking yesterday for a 1948 era
school bus for his pike but we couldn't find anything that fit. Most
are too modern and the Jordan, I think, bus is too old. We did note
the new 1951-1953 Greyhound buses from Mini-Metals and one of those
might be used in place of a school bus if nothing more accurate than
what we saw can be found.

Don Valentine

--- In _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...) , "paulbizier"
<pa.bizier@.pa> wrote:

I'm surprised that some of the other engineers on the list haven't
chimed in, but, at the risk of moderation jail...

vitrified clay (sewer pipes) - most common during steam era -
typically only 4' long. Much of this was regional transport - each
area had its own VCP manufacturing companies

ductile or cast iron - look the same - 20 foot joints - rail
transport
typical then (and now)- various joints - bell and socket and
flanged
most common

transite (an asbestos-cement product) - typically 4-8 feet long -
usual for water main during 50's - smaller diameters, usually (say
less than 12")

PVC - not common in our era, but 10' to 20' sections depending upon
type

Hope this helps.

Paul Bizier

--- In _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...) , "ed_mines"
<ed_mines@> wrote:

Aren't lot of these construction pipes (like the vitreous clay
pipes)
a lot shorter than 40 feet?

Wouldn't at least some of them be loaded in gondolas?

I'm guessing that they are too heavy for a man to lift (steal) by
himself.
>
Ed
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




**************Make your life easier with all your friends, email, and
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Re: Heinz freight car fleet

asychis@...
 

Al and Virgil,

Thanks for the information. I'll pursue the articles and see if the NMRA
has any information on the old SIG. Was it called Pickles in Miniature?

Jerry Michels
**************Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try the NEW
AOL.com.
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000002)


Re: paint match for dark olive green

VINCE PUGLIESE
 

You may want to look at some of the military paint ranges as dark olive is well represented.

.vp

--- On Tue, 12/2/08, Mark Pierce <marcoperforar@...> wrote:

From: Mark Pierce <marcoperforar@...>
Subject: [STMFC] paint match for dark olive green
To: STMFC@...
Received: Tuesday, December 2, 2008, 7:15 PM
Can anyone recommend a commercial product that will closely
match the
dark olive green paint ala SP such as used on express
boxcars, and in
particular, the Red Caboose models? Thanks.

Mark Pierce


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

John F. Pautz <jfpautz@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Douglas Harding" <dharding@...> wrote:
What I noticed was the Panera straw was a smaller diameter than the
standard McDonalds straw, but not as small as coffee
stirrers. Might be the perfect size for drill pipe.
Drill pipe (actually tubing, as it is sized by outside diameter rather
than nominal inside diameter for pipe) was usually 2-7/8, 3-5/8, 4-5/8
inch diameter. Generally drill tubing has one end upset by approximatly
1/2 inch and is then tapped, while the other end is threaded. For
shipping the threaded end has a protective plastic cap on it.

John F. Pautz
American Switch & Signal
P:48 track components


Re: Heinz freight car fleet

Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Howard - I don't know if copies were sent to the NMRA library. You might check there. I have a complete set but it's not easily accessable. - Al

----- Original Message -----
From: Howard R Garner
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, December 02, 2008 8:14 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Heinz freight car fleet


> Posted by: "Westerfield" westerfield@... alwesterfield
> Tue Dec 2, 2008 11:04 am (PST)
> Many years ago there was a Heinz pickel SIG with a quarterly newsletter. It ran out of steam because we covered the Heinz fleet as completely as possible. - Al Westerfield

Al,

Are these newsletters archive somewhere?
I would like to get copies.

Howard Garner


Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Bob McCarthy
 

--- On Wed, 12/3/08, Douglas Harding <dharding@...> wrote:

From: Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Pipe loads on the cheap
To: STMFC@...
Date: Wednesday, December 3, 2008, 3:28 AM






While I was at Naperville, I ate lunch at Panera Bread several times. A Canadian friend said he enjoyed eating at Panera because
their black plastic drinking straw made perfect pipe loads, as he grab a handful for his cold drink. A coat of dullcote and it was
ready. What I noticed was the Panera straw was a smaller diameter than the standard McDonalds straw, but not as small as coffee
stirrers. Might be the perfect size for drill pipe.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr. org


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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