Date   

Re: Shipping Sears Homes

Guy Wilber
 

John wrote:

The Sears catalog is a little more generic regarding mill locations...
Thanks to all for the input regarding the Sears and other manufacturers kit
built homes.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
West Bend, WI





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Re: 1950's Auto Transport Trailers

water.kresse@...
 

Tim,

I pondered over that statement. Rail (auto-rack box cars) was ramping down and truck haulage was ramping up. They had some beautiful trailers with enclosing sheet metal for hauling autos in those early-1950s days. The C&O was still adding or converting 50-ft Auto-Rack box cars in 1948.

If you look up that Iconografix book title (or get a brain flash) I would appreciate it.

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: timboconnor@...
Brian

Iconografix published a paperback book that contains a wonderful
collection of photos going back to the early part of the 20th Century
through the 1960's that has many outstanding photos of trailers,
freight cars, and even river barges (including a large postwar C&O
Ohio River barge) designed to transport automobiles. I forget the
exact title of the book (and I'm at work at the moment) but I'm pretty
sure "auto" or "automobile" appears in it.

And to correct Al a bit, by the early 1950's the dominant method of
transport for new automobiles was by highway, not rail. By the late
1950's railroads had a very small share of the business, although
railroads dominated in the auto parts business -- the reverse of the
situation today!

Tim O'Connor

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: water.kresse@...
Brian,

The mainstream means of automobile transporting out of the assembly plants in
the 1950's was still auto-rack box cars. They were beginning to use direct haul
truck tractor (cab over engine) and trailers in the early 1950s. There were a
few (two or three? GTW, PRR? others?) experimental flat cars with Evans Products
racks made in the mid-1950s. The C&O made up drawings and got patents in 1956
but didn't appear to have made any six-auto, double deck 56-ft flat cars. The
85-ft TOFs (two truck trailers) showed up in the late 50s. Direct drive up the
end with ramps flat cars with racks didn't become popular in the assembly plants
until the mid 60s. If you can go back to 1900 you can find 36-ft wooden flat
cars with wooden side rails/guides to ship buggies and carriages on.

Al Kresse


Re: Furniture Boxcars

Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

Hi Bob,

It's worth noting that the Santa Fe's "Fe" classification (as in "Fe-P") stood for "furniture and automobile" cars. Automobiles seem to have become the more important business category of the two, considering the number of cars fitted with auto-loading and parts racks and assigned to service for specific manufacturers.

So long,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@...
262-796-8776, ext. 461
FAX 262-796-1142


Re: 1950's Auto Transport Trailers

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Al Kresse wrote:
"The mainstream means of automobile transporting out of the assembly
plants in the 1950's was still auto-rack box cars. They were
beginning to use direct haul truck tractor (cab over engine) and
trailers in the early 1950s."

These trailers would steadily cut into the railroads' share of
finished auto traffic. By the late 1950s, many automobile boxcars
equipped with Evans Auto Loaders would become surplus. For example,
the Pennsy converted many Class X32 and subclass automobile cars into
Class X51E-X51H boxcars and Class K9/K9A stock cars beginning in
1959, as well as into Class X32D general service boxcars by removing
the auxiliary doors and plating over the opening.

"There were a few (two or three? GTW, PRR? others?) experimental flat
cars with Evans Products racks made in the mid-1950s."

Not PRR. NYC had at least two experimental cars - see the list
archives for previous discussions about these cars in conjunction
with the the Athearn 50 ft auto rack model.


Ben Hom


Re: 1950's Auto Transport Trailers

Tim O'Connor
 

Brian

Iconografix published a paperback book that contains a wonderful
collection of photos going back to the early part of the 20th Century
through the 1960's that has many outstanding photos of trailers,
freight cars, and even river barges (including a large postwar C&O
Ohio River barge) designed to transport automobiles. I forget the
exact title of the book (and I'm at work at the moment) but I'm pretty
sure "auto" or "automobile" appears in it.

And to correct Al a bit, by the early 1950's the dominant method of
transport for new automobiles was by highway, not rail. By the late
1950's railroads had a very small share of the business, although
railroads dominated in the auto parts business -- the reverse of the
situation today!

Tim O'Connor

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: water.kresse@...
Brian,

The mainstream means of automobile transporting out of the assembly plants in
the 1950's was still auto-rack box cars. They were beginning to use direct haul
truck tractor (cab over engine) and trailers in the early 1950s. There were a
few (two or three? GTW, PRR? others?) experimental flat cars with Evans Products
racks made in the mid-1950s. The C&O made up drawings and got patents in 1956
but didn't appear to have made any six-auto, double deck 56-ft flat cars. The
85-ft TOFs (two truck trailers) showed up in the late 50s. Direct drive up the
end with ramps flat cars with racks didn't become popular in the assembly plants
until the mid 60s. If you can go back to 1900 you can find 36-ft wooden flat
cars with wooden side rails/guides to ship buggies and carriages on.

Al Kresse


Re: Shipping Sears Homes

James Eckman
 

David Smith wrote:

The purchaser would receive all of the necessary supplies in
shipments by rail car (a typical house could fit into two boxcars)
for assembly either by the new homeowner or a local contractor.
I bet that would be very frustrating if only one of the two boxcars
showed up at the team track!
I believe these kits were also arrange to easily fit in standard size wagons as well, make a great team track diorama! Did they really require two boxcars? I know Sears worked very hard to fit everything in the tightest space to minimize freight. On the early ones bathrooms were optional!

Jim Eckman


Re: 1950's Auto Transport Trailers

bnpmodeler
 

Brian and list:

Although I am loathe to even bring it up in this particular venue, just
yesterday my mail carrier delivered the June 2008 issue of the
NMRA's 'Scale Rails'. In that issue, Mont Switzer models these trailers
in HO scale using a Heljan/Con-Cor kit. I never even knew such a kit
existed. I sure wish I had. I have no idea if they are still available;
I checked eBay without any success. They are beautiful, made more so by
the fine modeling exhibited by Mr. Switzer.

Personally speaking, this prototype modeling article alone has made
membership in NMRA worthwhile.

Jim Harr


--- In STMFC@..., "brianehni" <behni@...> wrote:

I'd like to model one of these as an early TOFC load, but can't seem
to find any plans.

Has anyone here got a set that would look right for mid-50's?

Brian Ehni

P.S. I seem to be unable to post messages here and on PCL via email;
I have to come to the
web site; anyone else having problems?


Re: 1950's Auto Transport Trailers

Bill Darnaby
 

It just so happens that the latest issue of the NMRA's Scale Rails has an article by Mont Switzer on doing exactly this.

Bill Darnaby

I'd like to model one of these as an early TOFC load, but can't seem to find any plans.

Has anyone here got a set that would look right for mid-50's?

Brian Ehni

P.S. I seem to be unable to post messages here and on PCL via email; I have to come to the
web site; anyone else having problems?


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: 1950's Auto Transport Trailers

water.kresse@...
 

Brian,

The mainstream means of automobile transporting out of the assembly plants in the 1950's was still auto-rack box cars. They were beginning to use direct haul truck tractor (cab over engine) and trailers in the early 1950s. There were a few (two or three? GTW, PRR? others?) experimental flat cars with Evans Products racks made in the mid-1950s. The C&O made up drawings and got patents in 1956 but didn't appear to have made any six-auto, double deck 56-ft flat cars. The 85-ft TOFs (two truck trailers) showed up in the late 50s. Direct drive up the end with ramps flat cars with racks didn't become popular in the assembly plants until the mid 60s. If you can go back to 1900 you can find 36-ft wooden flat cars with wooden side rails/guides to ship buggies and carriages on.

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: "brianehni" <behni@...>
I'd like to model one of these as an early TOFC load, but can't seem to find any plans.

Has anyone here got a set that would look right for mid-50's?

Brian Ehni

P.S. I seem to be unable to post messages here and on PCL via email; I have to come to the
web site; anyone else having problems?


Houston Roundhouse Closing

Paul Hillman
 

For those in the Houston, Texas area, The Houston Roundhouse Hobby Shop
is going out of business. They are, to me, the best stocked railroad
shop in the Houston area, if not the whole state.

They are offering big discounts on everything for the next two months,
their huge stock of brass too, I guess. Time for me to go wild and
stock up on RR stuff.

Humm!!....Where are all my credit cards at??

Paul Hillman


Re: Furniture Boxcars

David North <davenorth@...>
 

They were also used by the Santa Fe for wagons and farm implements, then
later were the freight car of choice for transporting motor vehicles.

This continued until the 50s IIRC. All ATSF FE class cars (FurniturE) were
double door cars.

Richard Hendrickson wrote the definitive book on these cars for the SFRH&MS,
so I'll not steal his thunder by quoting further from his reference book.

Cheers

Dave North


You're right I looked it's Methuen not Munsell

Charlie Duckworth <trduck@...>
 

I believe the color system referenced by Mr Rimmel was
published as the Methuen Handbook of Color which is
out of print though Oddly enough, Methuen references are typically
used by WWI modelers; the "rest" of the scale modelling
community typically cite FS595b references.
Thanks for the correction I was at work and mixed up Munsell with
Methuen. I believe Ray Rimmel use Muthuen system as (to him) there
weren't enough close colors to the WWI colors in the FS colors. Lucky
for us WWI modelers there wasn't much color photography taken and the
surviving colors have darken with age so there's not a lot of 'your
PC10' or 'German grey' is wrong with that this hobby.

Charlie
who models HO Mopac/RI and 1/48 WWI aircraft


Re: Furniture Boxcars

earlyrail
 

Furniture Boxcars
Posted by: "Bob Chaparro" thecitrusbelt@... thecitrusbelt
Tue May 20, 2008 3:41 pm (PDT)
Can someone provide a brief history of the furniture boxcar? I assume
these were mainly used for shipping personal property before a nation's
road system became more developed.
The BCR&N about 1900 had a comment in their annual report that the new furniture cars were well liked.
They were being used for loading oats and hay - both low density products.

Howard Garner
modeling 1905


Re: Furniture Boxcars

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

Bob

The CB&Q's first designated furniture cars were on the roster before 1885. They were 34' long with an 8' inside height, compared with the standard for box car at 28' long and 6' 10" inside height. The next group built from 1890 onwards were 40' outside length when box cars were still 34' or less, and with an inside height of 8' 9". The last increase in size was in 1899 with the introduction of bigger cars with 51' outside length and 9' 3" inside height, and a capacity of 4100 cu. ft. compared to the standard 40' box car with a capacity of about 2750 cu. ft. (The first 40' boxcars weren't on the roster until 1902) However, they were rated at 50,000 lb compared to 80,000 lb for box cars, so it was volume not tonnage capability that was important. The side doors were also bigger, being 7' 6" wide and 10' wide on the later cars.



The last of these cars didn't leave the roster until 1925, at which time they were the only 50' cars on the roster other than automobile cars and barrel cars, which shared the "volume not weight" characteristics.



The MCB designation was "XF - Furniture - similar in design to general service box car, but usually with greater cubic capacity"





Rupert Gamlen

Auckland NZ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bob Chaparro" <thecitrusbelt@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 21, 2008 10:41 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Furniture Boxcars


Can someone provide a brief history of the furniture boxcar? I assume
these were mainly used for shipping personal property before a nation's
road system became more developed.

Did these cars have special loading devices? Is there a point in time
that furniture boxcars generally fell out of use?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Shipping Sears Homes

Mark Mathu
 

David Smith wrote:

The purchaser would receive all of the necessary supplies in
shipments by rail car (a typical house could fit into two boxcars)
for assembly either by the new homeowner or a local contractor.
I bet that would be very frustrating if only one of the two boxcars
showed up at the team track!


Re: Shipping Sears Homes

Mark Mathu
 

Frank Pearsall wrote:
According to the "Aladdin "Built in a Day" House Catalog, 1917,"
"Aladdin houses are always shipped under the freight
classification of lumber with hardware, etc., listed under their
respective classifications." I would assume that Sears and
others did the same thing.
Hmmm... so would that mean a "typical house in two boxcars" would have
each freight car shipment billed at a different rate -- one rate for
the lumber and one rate for the rest of the house?
____
Mark Mathu
Whitefish Bay, Wis.


1950's Auto Transport Trailers

brianehni <behni@...>
 

I'd like to model one of these as an early TOFC load, but can't seem to find any plans.

Has anyone here got a set that would look right for mid-50's?

Brian Ehni

P.S. I seem to be unable to post messages here and on PCL via email; I have to come to the
web site; anyone else having problems?


Re: Repainting Prototype STMFCs, Three Questions

Walter M. Clark
 

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Walter M. Clark wrote:
As another example, the 1-inch stripes above the reporting mark and
below the car number were an ARA recommendation in February, 1952.
That would be a recommendation to DISCONTINUE the stripes in
February, 1952.
My SP Freight Cars, Vol. 1, DOES say it correctly on page 20;
Mr. Clark edited the actual sentence in haste and thereby garbled it.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history
Mr. Thompson is too kind with the word "edited." I think "bungled"
would be more appropriate:-( And I typed it with the book open in
front of me just so I wouldn't make a mistake. Just shows how
difficult it is to proof your own work.

Walter M. Clark
Time stopped in November 1941
Pullman, Washington, USA


Re: Furniture Boxcars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
Can someone provide a brief history of the furniture boxcar? I assume these were mainly used for shipping personal property before a nation's road system became more developed.
They may have been so used occasionally, but were primarily used to ship NEW furniture from the makers to the sellers. This was important when box cars were mostly a lot smaller and of low tonnage capacity, so the low density of furniture could justify a bigger body.

Did these cars have special loading devices? Is there a point in time that furniture boxcars generally fell out of use?
No on the devices. They fell out of use when conventional box cars were big enough for furniture shipping -- 50-foot cars, for example.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Erie Reverse Buckeye boxcar ends

leakinmywaders
 

Erie 40 ft, 10ft4in IH steel boxcars 96700-96899, built by Magor in
1936 had an unusual end referred to as a "Reverse Buckeye end." I'm
wanting to model a couple of these cars in their later incarnation as
NP 38760-38999. I have enough material gathered to ascertain that in
NP service these cars (at least some of them) retained their original
ends and Viking roofs, and in some cases their early Youngstown
(Camel?) 5/6/5 doors. Two modeling-related questions:

1) Before I plunge into an anticipated scratchbuild of these ends,
anyone know if some Erie niche modeler has already built HO scale
masters and had them cast in resin? As far as I have been tell it
appears these cars and ends haven't been available commercially in kit
or parts form.

2) Anyone know a source for these early 5/6/5 doors in HO?

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/erie96700b.jpg

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/erie96700adb.jpg

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/erie96700bdb.jpg


Finally, if anyone knows the date A.A. Morrison Co. acquired these
cars from the E-L, I'm interested (leased to the NP in 1962). Thanks,

Chris Frissell
Polson, MT

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